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Thread: PM66 Motor fried in middle of sale!

  1. #1

    Wink PM66 Motor fried in middle of sale!

    I have a Powermatic 66 tablesaw that I recently arranged to pass on in a trade deal. The buyer was going to pick up in 2 weeks, and low and behold, this weekend the 1.5hp, single phase Century Electric motor stopped working! It made a loud hum when turned on, but the motor wouldn't kick on. Well, I unmounted it, discharged the cap, and removed the 4 bolts to slide the housing apart. When I did, the brushes and 2 metal clips/housing, 3 springs and a washer fell out. It appears that the phenolic board that the brush contact points were mounted on is cracked right down the middle. I thought I was going to be able to just clean out the contact points, but now it appears the problem is more severe.
    I called up a few motor repair shops (Chicago) and one said I'm better off replacing the motor instead of repairing it, and another shop quoted me $570 for a new 3 hp c-frame motor. Considering this saw was almost out my door, I really really reeeeeallllly don't want to spend almost $600 on a new motor. I also don't know anything about buying used motors. Will any C-frame motor work that I find on eBay? My thoughts is to find a 1.5-3hp C frame motor used on eBay and price it out. Then give the buyer the option of me buying a used motor on eBay, or us splitting the difference of the new $570 motor. Of course timing was immaculate in this situation. Any insight or advice is much appreciated!! Or, if anybody has a C-frame 1.5-3hp motor that will fit my PM66 they would like to generously donate thanks all.

  2. #2
    Any NEMA 56-C motor will work. Some swimming pool pumps use this type motor. Contact Century and see what parts will cost, or just buy another NEMA 56-C frame motor. Be sure it rotates the way you need, and has same size shaft.

  3. #3
    Thanks Bruce, I figured there would be a few factors to consider that I wouldn't have thought of (rotation direction/shaft size).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zach Duran View Post
    Thanks Bruce, I figured there would be a few factors to consider that I wouldn't have thought of (rotation direction/shaft size).
    Frame size dictates shaft size and length. It's a fairly common motor, I would be inclined to order the parts and fix it.

  5. I would not want a 1.5 hp motor on that saw which would have me on the web, ebay & Amazon looking for a minimum of a 2 and preferably a 3hp motor. I live in a fairly low cost labor cost area yet the last couple of motors I've had go kaput it was not logical to do a rewind as cheaper to buy a new one. Ebay typically has a deal if your patient. The 1987 PM66 I just bought came with a 2 hp/220v motor and seems OK compared to the 3hp Grizzly I sold/replaced.

  6. #6
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    A quick peek at EBay: "https://www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc"]www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc[/URL][URL="https://www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc"]

    (What should​ be on that saw)



    My bad! That's a 3-phase.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 01-15-2020 at 9:16 AM. Reason: removed direct link

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Kreuzberg View Post
    A quick peek at EBay: "https://www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc"]www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc[/URL][URL="https://www.ebay.com/p/1600712813?iid=324041428201&rt=nc"]

    (What should​ be on that saw)

    My bad! That's a 3-phase.
    And it's only 1 HP
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 01-15-2020 at 9:16 AM.

  8. #8
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    Talk about brain freeze! Mea culpa.

  9. #9
    on the bright side at least it failed just before selling. I would heat to have something I sold fail a week after shipping or worse not work the day it arrived.

  10. #10
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    Your motor problem is very likely a failed start capacitor (the bump on the top of the motor). It could also be a stuck centrifugal start switch, located in the non shaft end of the motor. Replace the capacitor with the same rating new capacitor first. If that doesn't fix it, remove the non shaft end cover of the motor and you will find the switch. Clean the contacts of the switch and make certain that the contacts are closed against each other. The other part of the switch is the actuator, and it's located on the motor shaft. Two spring loaded weights swing out away from the motor shaft as the motor comes up to speed, and return as the motor slows down. They move a plastic collar on the motor shaft, which presses on the centrifugal start switch to open the switch when the motor is coming up to speed. Usually what happens is that the collar does not slide on the shaft, especially if the motor has not been used in a while. You need to clean and polish the area of the shaft so the collar can slide easily. A tiny bit of light oil on the shaft at this point will help too, but keep it only a tiny amount, because you don't want it flying off when the motor runs.

    Re-assemble the motor and try it. I'm quite certain that it will run fine now.

    Charley

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Lent View Post
    Your motor problem is very likely a failed start capacitor (the bump on the top of the motor). It could also be a stuck centrifugal start switch, located in the non shaft end of the motor. Replace the capacitor with the same rating new capacitor first. If that doesn't fix it, remove the non shaft end cover of the motor and you will find the switch. Clean the contacts of the switch and make certain that the contacts are closed against each other. The other part of the switch is the actuator, and it's located on the motor shaft. Two spring loaded weights swing out away from the motor shaft as the motor comes up to speed, and return as the motor slows down. They move a plastic collar on the motor shaft, which presses on the centrifugal start switch to open the switch when the motor is coming up to speed. Usually what happens is that the collar does not slide on the shaft, especially if the motor has not been used in a while. You need to clean and polish the area of the shaft so the collar can slide easily. A tiny bit of light oil on the shaft at this point will help too, but keep it only a tiny amount, because you don't want it flying off when the motor runs.

    Re-assemble the motor and try it. I'm quite certain that it will run fine now.

    Charley
    Read the first post. He already knows what the problem is.

  12. #12
    There are sites that have diagrams for NEMA motors, showing all the important measurements. Very helpful.

    The idea of 1.5 HP on a Powermatic 66 makes my skin crawl. For some reason, the one I bought has 5 HP, and I always thought that was normal because I didn't know any better.
    Cry "Havoc," and let slip the dogs of bench.

  13. #13
    Might want to see what Grizzly has to offer. I picked up 1.5 HP 56 frame motor for a very reasonable price. There's also Electric Motor Wholesale on the web.

  14. #14
    I'm no PM expert but I seem to recall that 80's and newer pm66's came with a 3 h.p. with a 5 h.p. as an option. I never paid much attention to what the 60's &. 70's saws had.

    At any rate, a saw like that wouldn't cut it for me with 2hp and 1.5 would laughable.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    At any rate, a saw like that wouldn't cut it for me with 2hp and 1.5 would laughable.
    I have three table saws at the moment, one of the last PM66s sold and a couple of portable jobsite saws for around the farm. The last two do not have powerful motors and can even be run from long 110v extension cords.

    I think whether a particular motor is useful for a specific person depends on what is done with it. I have no problem using the smaller saws for many purposes. I wouldn't be happy with cutting thick hardwoods but for many tasks with stock less than 2" thick, plywood, etc the power is certainly enough. I've built several buildings and did a lot of remodeling with these. Nothing I'd laugh about.

    I think my PM66 has a 3 hp motor and the power is easily enough for anything I've used it for. The precision is certainly better and it is easier to use, especially with the long table, good fence, and a slider.

    JKJ

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