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Thread: workbench protective cover

  1. #1

    workbench protective cover

    Any ideas?

    The silicone sheets look interesting as they should be long wearing and easy to store.

    I used to use hardboard cut to size, but it a pain to store when not in use.

    No interest in a paper role.

    I thought about maybe some Lino flooring cut to size.

    Also thought about a rubber door matt style runner. (nice and grippy)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Alabama
    Posts
    410
    I cover mine with misplaced tools and unfinished projects.
    Chuck Taylor

  3. #3
    Everything, and I mean EVERYTHING sticks to silicone: Sawdust, metal shavings, etc. Can't brush it off, can't sweep it away.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,659
    To protect it from glue drips, a coating of Danish oil, or BLO will make it easy to pop of the dried glue while not making the surface slipery. Every couple of years another coat may need to be applied.

  5. #5
    I have a piece of masonite cut to fit for when I am painting or something. I just slide it behind the workbench against the wall when not using it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    SE South Dakota
    Posts
    1,382
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Taylor View Post
    I cover mine with misplaced tools and unfinished projects.
    I think I may have found my long lost brother!
    Epilog TT 35W, 2 LMI SE225CV's
    CorelDraw 4 through 11
    CarveWright
    paper and pencils

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Granby, Connecticut - on the Mass border
    Posts
    315
    I have and use some old window shades, which I like because they roll out and lay flat. I store the roll under the benchtop.

    Ken

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Yorktown, VA
    Posts
    2,553
    I covered mine with the cutting mat from Jo-Ann Fabrics shown in the background here. Not sure what it's made of, but it's about an eighth of an inch thick, cut resistant and cleans easily. Maybe a type of UHMW...or HDPE?
    IMG_1545.jpg
    Last edited by Ted Calver; 01-14-2020 at 6:36 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
    Posts
    1,052
    I put down a double-layer of canvas drop cloth when finishing and a grippy rubber mesh mat when sanding.

    Otherwise the bench is maple with a thin coat of Seal-A-Cell on top. I chose Seal-A-Cell because there was a can on the shelf. Glue scrapes off 'easy enough' with a razor. I've refinished the bench top once in 3 years, just a quick sand and then reapply finish.

    The canvas protects well enough for finishing projects. I use a smaller piece of canvas on the back bench when mixing/stirring finishes.
    Mark McFarlane

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    51,046
    This is actually a relevant thing for a bench top I'm planning for another auxiliary bench setup. While the primary use for that top will be a down-draft sanding arrangement, there will also be consideration to using the surface for minor assembly and small item finishing. (It's an adjustable height bench setup, too) So I'm thinking about "inserts" that are optimal for each task...soft and perforated for down-draft sanding and solid and hard for minor assembly and detail finishing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Putney, Vermont
    Posts
    723
    I just use clear 6mil plastic sheeting , and I fold it up and set where ever when not in use.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    133
    1/4 inch melamine.
    Regards,

    Tom

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