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Thread: basement workshop floor

  1. #16
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    I've been planning to put a different floor in my basement workshop as well. Strongly considering these flexible PVC tiles. I dont want anything that looks like wood, rather just have something that looks industrial.

    https://www.rubberflooringinc.com/ga...lex-tiles.html
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #17
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    I don't know, Brian...that carpet you have now is pretty nice...
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I don't know, Brian...that carpet you have now is pretty nice...
    Living in such luxury has been nice
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Living in such luxury has been nice
    Yea...I'm sure working in socks and hoping you don't drop one of those razor-sharp chisels comes to mind, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
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    I’ve worn boots for the past few years, finally got approval from the higher ups. I figure this will contribute to the clean room appearance I’m aiming at.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  6. #21
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    I don't think I've ever seen it "not clean"...despite the volume of work you produce!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #22
    I wouldn't rule out carpet, have a look at this video from James Hamilton (Stumpy Nubs). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6wWGBc8_Zs

  8. #23
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    https://www.rubberflooringinc.com/ru..._source=google

    So much better than anti fatuge mats.

    I have terrible nerve damage in my feet and I’m good all day on these.

    Plus you can roll the, up if you get water or moisture very very easy.

    I have just purchased ruminants from a local gym outfitter first short money

  9. #24
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    Which thickness are you using, Patrick? I've been happy with the U-Line AF mat material but would consider something like you show if I have to replace something or want to reconfigure an area. I even have the U-Line product in my kitchen on the brick floor in the "galley" area where all cooking oriented standing occurs.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-19-2020 at 7:14 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
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    3/8

    Don’t be surprised the stuff is fairly hard by comparison to the squishy mats at woodcraft and Williams Sonoma.

    But surprisingly they work great. It’s also nice they are hard as rolling stuff across them is just like a hard floor for the most part.

    My old shop had hardwood floors. They where a dream on my old tired feet. My new shop is concrete and and it’s hell. By mid day I can hardly take it.

    In my own shop I only have mats at machines and my bench and I can be down there all day and never notice my feet.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    3/8

    Don’t be surprised the stuff is fairly hard by comparison to the squishy mats at woodcraft and Williams Sonoma.

    But surprisingly they work great. It’s also nice they are hard as rolling stuff across them is just like a hard floor for the most part.

    My old shop had hardwood floors. They where a dream on my old tired feet. My new shop is concrete and and it’s hell. By mid day I can hardly take it.

    In my own shop I only have mats at machines and my bench and I can be down there all day and never notice my feet.
    Concrete doesn't seem to bother my feet, but many really have problems with it. Thinking about the mechanics of it, it would seem that your shoes will have a much greater affect on your feet than what type of floor (except for something squishy like carpet or anti-fatigue mats). How much give does a hardwood floor have vs concrete? Thousandths of an inch, hundredths at most? But look at the available cushioning on good athletic shoes. I suppose if you have a pair of well worn very firm sole shoes or boots, they would be much more uncomfortable on concrete compared to a tennis style shoe with a rubber sole and good insoles. How about trying a good set of Dr. Scholls insoles before changing out your entire shop floor?
    NOW you tell me...

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    Concrete doesn't seem to bother my feet, but many really have problems with it. Thinking about the mechanics of it, it would seem that your shoes will have a much greater affect on your feet than what type of floor (except for something squishy like carpet or anti-fatigue mats). How much give does a hardwood floor have vs concrete? Thousandths of an inch, hundredths at most? But look at the available cushioning on good athletic shoes. I suppose if you have a pair of well worn very firm sole shoes or boots, they would be much more uncomfortable on concrete compared to a tennis style shoe with a rubber sole and good insoles. How about trying a good set of Dr. Scholls insoles before changing out your entire shop floor?

    You can easily feel the difference running, in the same shoes, on concrete, asphalt, and packed dirt. The hardness is in that order, and it's very noticeable.

    Additionally, concrete is cold and it's brutal on anything that happens to be dropped. The floors in my house are mostly dyed concrete, we have pads in the kitchen at the work areas, because it helps.
    Last edited by mike stenson; 01-20-2020 at 10:12 AM.

  13. #28
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    Yes, I was surprised by the increased comfort level when I ditched my ‘soakin wet Stacys’ (to paraphrase Tom Waits) and stepped into new workshop shoes.

  14. #29
    I’ve heard good things about Delta-FL. You need something like that because the slab almost certainly does not have a vapor barrier under it. You might also consider 1” XPS foam board (tape the joints) with 3/4” ply over it (biscuit the seams) Buildingscience.com has some useful information.

  15. #30
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    If Concrete meets earth, there will still be moisture migration, even with a very good drain system in place . . . sorry. The only way around it is a vapor barrier under the gravel base before the concrete is poured.

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