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Thread: Dust collection in G1023RLWX table saw

  1. #1

    Dust collection in G1023RLWX table saw

    I would like to get better dust collection on my table saw. I found a few older threads referencing this saw but none of them seemed to be quite applicable to what I am thinking. I also think the saw has changed over the years. I have attached some photos for those not familiar with this model.

    I have a 4 inch DC hose going straight to the saw. I am thinking about modifying the blade shroud or making a new one that will allow the 4 inch DC hose to go directly to the blade shroud. I thought about plugging the two inch hole at the back and cutting a 4 inch hole parallel to the blade and attaching a fitting to that. I'd then have to cut a hole in the back of the saw to allow for the inch hose. Thoughts?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
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    429
    I have the same saw and same crappy dust collection. I've read that some remove the shroud and just collect at the bottom. Others have sealed off the other openings to improve cabinet suction. I tried this but didn't see huge improvement. I always run with a collector running. Otherwise the small hose on the shroud can clog. But about every couple of months I have to use a long stick to coerce the dust in the cabinet to the exit hole. It's a workable situation for me, but I'm not a heavy user either.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
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    4,456
    I cannot speak to over the blade collection, but I can sure mention the almost kink in that 4" internal hose.

    If mine, I would unhook the internal hose, seal the big hole at the back of the cabinet, and install a DC connection at the bottom of the cabinet, with a sloping floor if it doesn't already have one.

    My 30 year old Unisaw used to get clogged with sawdust when I ran a 4" hose to the optional factory connection (which by the way had a 5" outlet fitting). I was using a 5/4 adaptor for years. When I finally ran a 6" hose to the same connection it was like night and day. Most dust in the cabinet just goes on out now. Every once in a while, now I just hit the inside corners with an air hose through the blade opening, while the DC is on.

    The only time I get sawdust that has trouble exiting now is when I rip a bunch of semi wet 2X lumber for construction around the old homestead. It produces stringy damp sawdust that clumps, and I am sure to blow it out as mentioned
    above immediately.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    1,281
    Gunter,I do not have this saw. I have a older Delta Unisaw,My guess is that even the four inch hose is undersized for the cfm needed for your saw.I have a five inch port on the bottom rear of my saw and then installed a sloped "floor"with duct tape and cardboard to slope to the port. I also have a Sharkgaurd with a 3" hose on top. My dust collection is still a work in progress on this saw,I am replacing the door with a custom made piece of hardboard to get the airflow to help sweep dust to my duct on the bottom end. The Sharkguard on top does a great job and gets pretty well all dust off the top of the blade except when you do skimming cuts. Also think that you do need collection off the top of the blade as well as from below the table,hope this helps.

  5. #5
    I am less concerned with the dust in the cabinet than I am with the dust that comes back out the top of the saw. If I do not use a guard the dust sprays all over me. If I do it piles up under the guard and makes it impossible to see anything.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Alberta
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    If you are trying to get the dust on the top side a Sharkguard is something you should consider. Mine sucks so well that I usually leave the blast gate half closed so small off cuts are not sucked up.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    sykesville, maryland
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    429
    Quote Originally Posted by Günter VögelBerg View Post
    I am less concerned with the dust in the cabinet than I am with the dust that comes back out the top of the saw. If I do not use a guard the dust sprays all over me. If I do it piles up under the guard and makes it impossible to see anything.
    If you want rid of topside dust, you'll have to add a topside dust collector. There are several after market devices that do this. My DC connects just under the front of the table with a dust right quick fitting. I just vacuum the top manually after I turn off the saw. That's one advantage of a non-permanent collection hook up. I don't get much dust on my body, that I notice. But many times it's hard to tell as I just stopped the lathe a few minutes earlier

  8. #8
    It seems to me that all the dust coming out of the top actually originates under the table. Is it hopeless to capture the vast bulk of it before it is kicked back out of the top?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
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    571
    Hi Gunter,
    I have the same saw. Here is my dust collection setup. I adapted the SawStop blade guard to fit and when used in conjunction with suction on the cabinet, it works great!
    I use a blast gate to balance the suction between the cabinet and blade guard.
    I helps to seal up the curved slot at the front of the cabinet (used to accommodate tilting the arbor). I am using a large Craftsman shop vac and have since added the Oneida dust deputy.
    David

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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
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    580
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    I adapted the SawStop blade guard to fit ...
    I did that on my previous saw (Ridgid contractor-style) and it worked great, especially on rip cuts where the off-cut is wider than about 1/2". Anything narrower than that (i.e. a skimming cut) didn't get captured very well, and neither did crosscuts due to the miter gauge lifting the guard too high for it to be effective.

    My current saw is a slider that came with its own guard with a vacuum attachment. It doesn't have the funnel-style like the SawStop guard, nor does it have those individual side pieces that can move up and down with the piece. As a result, it doesn't work as well as the SawStop, although it does work pretty well. I haven't yet bothered to try to adapt the SawStop guard to my current saw, but I want to try that some day.

    At one point I had mine hooked up to a branch on my DC, but I find dedicating the shop vac to the overhead while using a DC at the cabinet works great.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    If you are trying to get the dust on the top side a Sharkguard is something you should consider. Mine sucks so well that I usually leave the blast gate half closed so small off cuts are not sucked up.
    Agree with Mike here. You can get the Sharkguard with a 4 inch port - does a great job.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Stone Mountain, GA
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    494
    Quote Originally Posted by Günter VögelBerg View Post
    It seems to me that all the dust coming out of the top actually originates under the table. Is it hopeless to capture the vast bulk of it before it is kicked back out of the top?
    This is the ideal approach but its difficult to do. You need high velocity airflow to rip the dust out of the blade gullets while they are under the table. To get that I'd want a very tight fitting shroud and then a high SP dust extractor to get a very high airflow velocity. But with all the movements of the blade in a table saw it's not feasible without having something super complicated and fussy. For example you could build a shroud that would be pretty effective with the blade fully raised at 90, but if you lower the blade to 1/2" high then you have a large gap between the top of the shroud and bottom of the table. If you tilt over to 45 you open up a large gap on one side. Also to accommodate a dado stack and facilitate blade changes the shroud has to be made a lot wider than is ideal for a regular blade.

    I have thought about this some because I made a fiberglass blade shroud for a PM66, with a 4" outlet, similar to your idea for the Grizzly. Once I started mocking it up I realized I could not get it as tight fitting as I had been imagining. Ended up being quite a compromise. But with the 4" connection it moves a decent volume of air and does pretty well at keeping the cabinet clean- so your concept would likely be an improvement. But the airflow is not violent enough to remove all of the dust from the gullets, so you'd still want overhead collection to keep the table clean.

    Another approach is to use brushes or compressed air to get the dust out of the gullets. If the blade were fixed that might be feasible, but to accommodate all the movement seems too much trouble.

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