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Thread: microcrystalline waxes

  1. #1
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    microcrystalline waxes

    Anyone use E.J. Wheaton mc wax? How does it compare to Renaissance?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    Anyone use E.J. Wheaton mc wax? How does it compare to Renaissance?
    I bought some about a year ago (from Amazon), partly because the price was a cheaper and partly to compare to the Renaissance wax. It was harder to start with and got worse as it dried out. Was harder to apply. Perhaps my sample wasn't typical but I probably won't buy it again.

    JKJ

  3. #3
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    I bought some to try. Any thoughts on using mineral spirits to soften?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    I bought some to try. Any thoughts on using mineral spirits to soften?
    Perhaps. I'm sending them a query.

    JKJ

  5. #5
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    Tom, I sent a note to E.J. Wheaton. First they wanted to send me a replacement can but I finally got them to understand I didn't need one but just wanted do know if a solvent could be added to soften mine. They suggested what you said:

    Small amount of mineral spirits should do the trick , at room temperature.
    Let me know if that works.

  6. #6
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    Thanks John. I just got the can and it appears pretty soft. I'll give it a try first like it is and if it gets stiff, I'll add some MS, in small amounts until I'm comfortable with the effect.

  7. #7
    Are any of you applying it with a buffing system or does it need to be applied with a rag and then buffed out? If applied but the buff how does one apply it to the buffing wheel?
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  8. #8
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    Pete - the only time I buffed it on the wheel I applied with cloth then buffed. This was after a couple coats wiped on of oil, followed with a tripoli buff when dry. I used a new wax buff. Since I‘m not a fan of a gloss finish on my work generally, I wound up reapplying the ren wax with 4o steel wool and hand buffing to a softer sheen.

  9. #9
    Thanks Jeffery. I do suppose I should get a new buff but am wondering if I could clean the one I have with my 40 grit gouge and from then on use it only for the new wax. I sure like a high polish on some of my work but try not to overdo it so I often use a flat or matt finish.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Blair View Post
    Are any of you applying it with a buffing system or does it need to be applied with a rag and then buffed out? If applied but the buff how does one apply it to the buffing wheel?
    If I'm power buffing the piece (Beale, etc) I do it before applying the Reniassance Wax. When everything else is done, the wax is applied with a small cloth then buffed by hand with a larger soft cotton cloth. These instructions are on the can.

    JKJ

  11. #11
    Thanks John i have indeed read the directions but as usual I am looking for an easy way out. Was hoping I could just use it in the same manner and instead of the wax bar that I have been using.LOL
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Blair View Post
    Thanks John i have indeed read the directions but as usual I am looking for an easy way out. Was hoping I could just use it in the same manner and instead of the wax bar that I have been using.LOL
    Please, experiment and report! May be a useful technique.

    I know one person who commonly used Reniassance Wax for the sole finish on some pieces, something I never thought of until then. Works well on hard, fine-grained woods like dogwood, ebony, etc. Still applied and polished by hand with a cloth, though.

    JKJ

  13. #13
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    I've read where others have used RW or Conservators wax on a beale buff in place of the Canauba. I plan to try it myself as I have a new beale wax buff to try it with. I'll report back when I do. Work keeps getting in the way though.

  14. #14
    Thanks Tom. I look forward to your report.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

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