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Thread: Fixing festool domino mistakes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    Ogden, UT
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    Fixing festool domino mistakes

    I'm sure I'm not the only one. Is there a router template like a bowtie template so that I can make plugs to cover up mid located domino holes? Much like how circle plug cutters can be used

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    Ogden, UT
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    This guy used a bandsaw and sander... Seems scary, prefer the router template

    http://www.halfinchshy.com/2010/05/b...minos.html?m=1

  3. #3
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    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    ............

    Made a typo

  4. #4
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    If you don't have a CNC, find a friend who does. Since the Domino cuts a pretty precise mortise, it would not be difficult to cut inserts to fit snugly. I use this technique now for non-common circular plugs in many cases, but the shape doesn't matter as long as it's measurable.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    I've glued a thin scrap to the end of the Domino then sanded it flush. Cut the Domino to length then drive it home.
    Last edited by johnny means; 01-12-2020 at 11:54 AM.

  6. #6
    fortunately my only mis-placed domino slots have been where I could just make a larger slotted mortise out of it rather than the smaller domino joint I planned. I then cut a piece of scrap for the larger tenon. It isn't hard to make dominos either - if you need different grain orientation or to make the wood.

  7. #7
    I use shop made dominos for most applications. These can be tweaked to fit perfectly or with matching grain orientation.

    For smaller dominos, you don't even have to roundover the corners. Make them very slightly oversized and pound them in - using the mortise as a dowelplate is used.

    Alternatively, you can square the mortise corners with a chisel to fit square stock.

  8. #8
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    Oct 2016
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    Ogden, UT
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    That was really easy. Not sure why I didn't think of this. Thanks for the suggestion

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Houston, Texas area
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I've glued a thin scrap to the end of the Domino then sanded it flush. Cut the Domino to length then drive it home.
    Great idea, thanks Johnny.
    Mark McFarlane

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
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    But don't you wind up with end grain using the shop made dominos?
    I've used Jim's method mentioned above with very good success. It's an easy setup for CNC and you can cut several at a time to fid the best grain and figure match.

  11. #11
    Sometimes it doesn't matter; it's a flaw that looks professionally fixed and non-objectionable (Hat tipped to Cindy Crawford, Eva Mendez).

    If one wanted to make a side-grain patch, I'd do it a little like Johnny describes:

    Trim a regular domino to be 1/4" short of the surface, glue it in. Then square the corners of the mortise and glue in a 1/4" 'veneer' piece, in your desired orientation. I haven't made a full-depth side-grain domino; I suspect it might split if hammered too hard; so the fit would have to be perfect before. Too much work for me.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Ogden, UT
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    504
    Yeah, I followed the advice of making a 1/4" thk side grain piece and back filled the rest of the hole with domino.

    I'll sand tomorrow, but they look good so far

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