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Thread: Moving New Tablesaw into the basement

  1. #1

    Moving New Tablesaw into the basement

    I am considering purchasing a Grizzly G1023 cabinet saw. The problem is I only have basement access through the house. I am thinking that if I remove all of the top and possibly the motor as well that it might be lite enough to get it down the stairs with out causing damage to the house, saw or myself and helpers and still get it back together in working order. For any of you that have purchased this saw, do you think this is a viable option?

  2. #2
    Basements are tough. I have not moved a GO1023 but have put a Unisaw into a basement as well as barrels of cider, etc. I wouldn't take it apart any further than necessary to fit through the door. With the top removed will the body of the saw go through the door? An appliance cart secured to the cabinet is good. A couple 2x10's or so secured to the stairs to smooth the drop makes things a bit more comfortable. The hairy part is getting the cart over that first step at the top. You then need the rigging or enough muscle to hold back on the load. Don't get below it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    I would not remove the top as you will mess up the calibration.

    Remove the motor if you must however an appliance cart can be rented for pocket change which will make moving the saw with one helper very easy.........Rod.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
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    Iíve moved half a dozen cabinet saws up and down stairs. If I have a strong helper I leave the top on, but remove the wings and fence of course. Strap the saw to appliance dolly with pneumatic wheels that can bump down the stairs. Might need to remove a hand wheel or two to clear door frames.

    Iíve moved them down stairs myself with the top and motor removed. But honestly Iíd recommend removing the top anyway. Once you have it in your shop in place, you should do a full alignment of the table anyway so you might as well take it off and make it easier to move.

    And donít rent an appliance dolly, buy one for 30 bucks at Harbor freight or your local big box.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Western PA
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    Im in a basement too; however, it has an on-grade access door, thankfully. I have moved many table saws in and out of the basement--i think the count is up to 7 now. All but the contractor saw were mostly dissembled prior to moving them in. Unless you are Paul Bunyan, I would take that thing apart into manageable pieces. The whole saw probably weighs 350-400lbs. It's essentially a unisaw, which ive owned 3-4 of. They arent heavy, but that is a bit much for one person fighting against gravity going downstairs. Compare that to 75-100lbs, and you would have to be incapable, disabled, or foolish to mess it up. Why take the risk of dumping your new toy and potentially injuring yourself or a friend? Taking the motor off and back on is a 30 min job at most. Undo the motor leads to separate the motor from the switch, unbolt the motor, and set it aside. Do the same in reverse to put it back on. Taking the table off and putting it back on is 3 minutes. No offense to Grizzly, but lets be honest with ourselves, that thing isnt coming from the far east dead nuts on calibrated. You are going to have to calibrate it with a dial indicator anyways, whether the top comes off or not. This is a very easy job on a cabinet saw. Loosen all but on bolt and use a dead blow to tap your way to perfection.

  6. #6
    I moved a sawstop into the basement with my wife having removed the top. It wasn't bad to realign it, but it would have been nice to not take it off. Overall not a too bad to do. I left the motor in not wanting to deal with the awkward angles of getting it back lined up with the mounting holes and bolt it in place and get the belt on.

    It was fairly heavy, but my wife managed. If I had a friend we probably could have managed without removing the top. An appliance dolly would have been a big help as well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    Germany
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    My basement shop is accessible only through the open wooden stairs. I moved all of my shop equipment down the stairs, but the Minimax SC2 Classic had to go down in pieces. Since it had to be commissioned anyway, I didn't have any hesitation about disassembling it to the point where two people could carry or maneuver the components down the stairs. I used a chain hoist for the cast iron table and the concrete counterweight, but everything else could be carried.

    See Mike's Shop is Underway for a description with pictures.

    My shop still isn't finished, but I am still working on it two years later.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Peoria, IL
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    You didn't mention anything about door width restrictions. Best case scenario is leave it in the crate, rent an appliance dolly, then use rope to ease it down the steps still strapped to the dolley.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    I wouldn't hesitate to remove the top. If you can do it with just the wings removed then clearly that's the way to go. Removing the top will mean setting the miter slot back up to the blade. This isn't hard but should be done with more accuracy than a tape measure.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Kansas City
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    In similar situation, I found a cheap hoist from Harbor Freight helped put things back together.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    sykesville, maryland
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    You can rent a power dolly that goes up/down steps for about $100. They work good and are much safer than a regular hand truck. I used one to get a 700 lb boiler out of an old house with a narrow stairwell. Was worth every penny of the rental cost.
    https://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equip...-hand-trucks/#
    Last edited by tom lucas; 01-10-2020 at 8:12 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    West Lafayette, IN
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    A lectro-truck or similar is WAY overkill for a little cabinet saw. Remove the top, strap it to a dolly, and bump it down the stairs already. Strap the table to the dolly and do that first so you get the hang of bumping the dolly down the stairs.

    If youíve never done it before, inch the wheels toward the edge of the top tread and just as gravity starts to take over and itís going to the next step down pull back on the dolly to slow the bump. Having a helper below you and working in unison will make it an easy job. Practice on a single step outside if you have to.

    Chain boosts and battery powered hand trucks are great but they just arenít needed here. I used a battery powered hand truck to move a 600 lb 20Ē bandsaw up and down my steps but that was heavier and a lot more awkward. And I used my chain hoist to carefully align my planer table onto the base of the planer, but that table probably weighs 150 pounds and needs to be lifted 5í in the air to clear the base.

  13. #13
    Hire movers. Most moving places will send some guys for $75/hr plus mileage (most places,not two men and a truck)
    Remember when we were young and our friends would help us move for pizza and beer, well those days are over. If i knew then how economical movers are i would have hired them back then

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Take a good look at the basement stairs. In my old house, I was preparing for the delivery of a cabinet saw and was amazed at how flimsy my stairs were. I wound up putting 4x4 posts at the midway point and at the top. Iím absolutely convinced that they would have collapsed otherwise. Aft the saw arrived, I took out the posts at the top but kept them for the inevitable trip back up. When we moved, we hired machine riggers. They moved every heavy machine from my basement to my garage including the sawstop, three bandsaws, 6Ē jointer, floor standing drill press, and other stuff. It was a crew of three or four people for three hours. I think the bill was around $1100. Not cheap but they were insured and very experienced.

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    I moved an 18Ē rikon bandsaw to my basement with the help of a co-worker who is an expert rock climber. He had all sorts of good ideas about how to rig safety ropes and had plenty of hardware.

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