Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 53 of 53

Thread: Bauerle planer

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    Its 25 years newer. This planer was built in 1960.

    Everything is 15 years older than I remember. Dave

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamstown,ma
    Posts
    988
    Seems everything Baurele made is well thought out and robust as well as having great lines.
    2 things on this planer that are surprising- the solid infeed roll is less than optimal for a 30" machine, and the 4 speed feed.
    I would expect this machine to have segmented feed roll, and variable speed feed.
    The variable feed might not have been used, due to the idea that it is not as durable as gear driven selectable speeds, but the solid infeed is just strange, unless ordered as such.

    I have seen only one of their bandsaws in person, at an auction some years back- interesting design for sure.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,463
    Peter,

    Two 72 camelbacks local to me on Craigslist if you are interested,

    You know the old tool lover in me wants one or both but Im not gonna buy them do might as well point them out.

    Asking $600 each one is Brown and Sharp other I dint remember..

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamstown,ma
    Posts
    988
    Patrick, I did see those, and that was what I was referring to. I looked for one, for years, then I just got on with life.
    For me, I realized they were more nice, than necessary...

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    1,789
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by peter gagliardi View Post
    Seems everything Baurele made is well thought out and robust as well as having great lines.
    2 things on this planer that are surprising- the solid infeed roll is less than optimal for a 30" machine, and the 4 speed feed.
    I would expect this machine to have segmented feed roll, and variable speed feed.
    The variable feed might not have been used, due to the idea that it is not as durable as gear driven selectable speeds, but the solid infeed is just strange, unless ordered as such.

    I have seen only one of their bandsaws in person, at an auction some years back- interesting design for sure.
    I have seen both kinds of feed rolls, but these machines are typically designed an used as finish planers. The couple late model kolles I had were solid infeed and a 4 speed gear box. The HCH I had was the only one I have seen with a VS gearbox.

    Buss ran 2 and 4 speed motors for feed along with a Reeves drive option.

    Feed speeds are 23, 29, 46 and 59 feet a minute.

  6. #51
    Hello to all. This is my first post.
    I have the same Baurle planer and have run it for almost 35 years. There used to be a gentleman in Claremont NH named Henry Wiegand who imported many German machines, mostly Hempel automatic lathes. I bought my planer used through him. Much of the Bauerle equipment in the Northeast was 550 volts, as it was imported by Chas. Gentmantel in Montreal for the Canadian market. Bauerle was later taken over by Okoma, another German company, so some later machines can bear either name.
    I originally found the Bauerle planer unusual by US standards, as it had a spring weighted pressure bar and no provision for jointing or grinding. The German craftsmen I bought it from were incredulous at the concept of jointing (actually dulling the knives!).The idea of grinding the knives in the head equally horrified them. Turns out they were right about everything. The pressure bar has never needed adjustment in 35 years, and the quick change knife set-up allows for grinding the knives in a wet grinder, not in the planer where you would scatter abrasives particles all over and burn the knives.
    I'm sure I have the manual somewhere if you ever need it copied.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    591
    Walter, "the biggest little sash shop" Phelps. It's been a long time, how are you doing? Do you still have the supersurfacers? Yes the grinding knives in the machine does kind of seem just plain wrong for sure.


    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Phelps View Post
    Hello to all. This is my first post.
    I have the same Baurle planer and have run it for almost 35 years. There used to be a gentleman in Claremont NH named Henry Wiegand who imported many German machines, mostly Hempel automatic lathes. I bought my planer used through him. Much of the Bauerle equipment in the Northeast was 550 volts, as it was imported by Chas. Gentmantel in Montreal for the Canadian market. Bauerle was later taken over by Okoma, another German company, so some later machines can bear either name.
    I originally found the Bauerle planer unusual by US standards, as it had a spring weighted pressure bar and no provision for jointing or grinding. The German craftsmen I bought it from were incredulous at the concept of jointing (actually dulling the knives!).The idea of grinding the knives in the head equally horrified them. Turns out they were right about everything. The pressure bar has never needed adjustment in 35 years, and the quick change knife set-up allows for grinding the knives in a wet grinder, not in the planer where you would scatter abrasives particles all over and burn the knives.
    I'm sure I have the manual somewhere if you ever need it copied.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    1,789
    Blog Entries
    2
    Spring loaded knives with their setting gauge is pretty slick.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •