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Thread: Good and reasonably priced track saw

  1. #31
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    I have the cordless DeWalt and love it but it was $800+ all in with the small and large tracks. Grizzly and WEN have track saws that get decent reviews but I think they only have shorter trackers. I think you can get the WEN and a couple of tracks all in for around $200.

  2. #32
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    I have an EZ-Smart system that I have been using for approx. 15 years. Hitachi C7SB2 saw. There have been a few times I would like a larger depth of cut, DeWalt, Skil and Makita all make 8-1/4" and larger saws that will work with the EZ-Smart system.
    Jon Endres
    Killing Trees Since 1983

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Endres View Post
    I have an EZ-Smart system that I have been using for approx. 15 years. Hitachi C7SB2 saw. There have been a few times I would like a larger depth of cut, DeWalt, Skil and Makita all make 8-1/4" and larger saws that will work with the EZ-Smart system.
    Unfortunately, EZ is no longer an option...they are no longer in business, AFAIK.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
    Another Makita user here. CPO had a batch of pre owned saws at $250 this fall, it did come with a brand new 48 tooth blade (which has amazing quality for a factory blade).
    Got the track through Amazon because of free returns in the event that it was not true, it ended up being dead straight. Out the door $330 all set.

    Big pro on the Makita, the track design attaches like festool tracks meaning all the festool based accessories will work. The big bonus for me there was the TSO GRC-12 track connectors will work on it. Those will allow you to combine two tracks without a nightmare of set up given the "keystone" feature. Personally a ~120" track is just too much of a pain to figure out storage in my very small garage with storage in rafters and many lights.

    If this is just for one project though I'd clamp down some ply as a straight edge, use a decent blade and hit it with a few passes on a hand plane to get a really smooth finish (I've always found circular saws geared toward rough carpentry work to have more runout in the arbor and not get perfectly smooth edge).

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Unfortunately, EZ is no longer an option...they are no longer in business, AFAIK.

    Wow, that's a bit of a shock!

  6. #36
    No one has mentioned this, so I will -

    Using a DIY or other straight edge with a good ol circular saw is a fools errand in my view. I can't think of any offhand that have dust collection or an effective, accurate and repeatable depth stop. I find both essential for work needing a saw with a straight edge in the first place.

    Todd, we may just have differing views on what's "spittin distance". A kreg saw and track or the makita 6000 can be had for $400 and $429 with a guide rail. Cheaper if you can find a special on the makita. A Festool plus a rail will cost you $750 and never go on sale. That's close to double.

    That WEN at <$200 all in is hard to beat for a one time or very in-frequent use. Sure you make sacrifices, but for $175 what do you expect.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Clark View Post
    Wow, that's a bit of a shock!
    I didn't doubt Jim but it certainly looks to be true: https://www.eurekazone.com/default.asp

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    I think you can get the WEN and a couple of tracks all in for around $200.
    What is it about WEN that they can provide the same machines as others, but at a substantial discount? I was looking at small oscillating sanders for a one-time project. Ended up with a WEN at much less cost than other look-a-likes. Same table shape, same horsepower, same number of drums. Built cheaper or is it the business model? I presume they all come from the same Chinese factory with just enough mods to be a bit different.
    NOW you tell me...

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Unfortunately, EZ is no longer an option...they are no longer in business, AFAIK.
    Well. That bites. I'm glad I bought some extra parts and anti-chip inserts.
    Jon Endres
    Killing Trees Since 1983

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    What is it about WEN that they can provide the same machines as others, but at a substantial discount? I was looking at small oscillating sanders for a one-time project. Ended up with a WEN at much less cost than other look-a-likes. Same table shape, same horsepower, same number of drums. Built cheaper or is it the business model? I presume they all come from the same Chinese factory with just enough mods to be a bit different.
    High volume and low standards I guess. I have multiple WEN tools; bandsaw, spindle sander, belt/disc sander, drill press, air filter. They are fine for what they are. Decent option for building up a shop. The drill press isnt great. I should spend some time trying to tune it up. I got a Laguna 18bx to replace my WEN 10" bandsaw this past summer. Was planning on giving away the WEN but have ended up keeping it. It's come in handy when I have my 1" resaw blade on my Laguna.

  11. #41
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    Based solely on others input, the Makita sounds like a good idea.

    That said, I'm with Derek above. I went with Festool and have never regretted the purchase. There are great third party accessories to compliment Festool as your arsenal grows.

    (Most) of the Festool system is superb. While I have a lot of their tools, not everything has been a home run. So if you go this route, do your research.

  12. #42
    I like my makita but agree it seems a bit underpowered. I use the depth stop feature to cut in two passes for hardwood thicker than 3/4 or so.

  13. #43
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    Double dipping. Your getting the same info here. Makita from CPO outlets is going to be your cheapest option but your still going to be stuck with your shallow depth of cut problem and the cost of the track. There is NO cheap option for tracks unless you find one used for dirt on craigslist.

    You had a good plan with a plain jane saw and a piece of ply for a straight edge. Its your cheapest way out if your in the "resin table" hell hole. Deeper depth of cut. Pretty much zero cost other than a home center saw.

    The track serves you little to no purpose other than a little bit of convenience with regards to referencing. Breaking down a slab table there is zero gain to some precise anti-chip/vacuum cut (though it saves some sweeping).

    Track saws can be very cumbersome and slow to use with the hose, the depth lock (thumb to release depth) and the electronic speed control in that if your finger flutters on the trigger for a split second the saw will wind down like its unplugged.

    They suit fussy work.

    A resin table is perfectly suited for the fastest saw to get the job done.

    Dont forget that if this isnt for yourself, make it clear there is no warranty.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  14. #44
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    I'll just add that a couple of reviewers accidentally tested the Makita at a speed setting of 4 and it was comparable to the other saws tested. Realizing their mistake they set the speed to 6 (full) and found that the saw labored in the same cuts where it worked fine at 4. Having seen the review before I got my SP6K I tried it at 4 and 6 in identical cuts and feed rates and found this to be oddly correct with the supplied blade.
    Who knows what stands in front of,
    our lives; I fashion my future on films in space.

  15. #45
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    > Track saws can be very cumbersome and slow to use with the hose, the depth lock (thumb to release depth) and the electronic speed control in that if your finger flutters on the trigger for a split second the saw will wind down like its unplugged.

    the more u spend, the more problems are solved. I too found my Festool track use a bit cumbersome, but effective. But then, I went with the TS55 Battery saw, and it was a game changer. no cord, no dust hose. I was doubtful of both the dust collection and the power.... remarkably, both were superb. Now, finally my track system is easy to use.

    But on the subject of cumbersome, with all tracks, measuring can be tricky....which side of the blade is your waste piece, blade thickness, support pieces for track for over cut, thin board cut, etc. You need to be a problem solver to get all the set up right, so I agree on those parts, but thats what it takes to get a dust free, splinter free and straight cut.

    I have bought all kinds of accessories to reduce measuring mistakes, better repeatability, etc. They help, sometimes, but even they are finniky to set up. BTW, u can spend as much on these measuring accessories as an entire track saw set up. The WP version was nice, but $500 - 600 IIRC. So if you get all the accessories, you spent as much as a Cabinet saw cost. But you can not fold up your Cabinet saw and store it on a shelf, hence the value. I used to try to cut sheets down on my TS, too cumbersome for solo work. The amount of space required for infeed and outfeed, crowded my shop too much. Now I use the Cabinet saw for cross cuts and rips of boards 3ft or less.
    Last edited by Will Blick; 01-07-2020 at 5:59 PM.

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