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Thread: Utility Bills

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Holy moly Ken, How many employees do you have in that shop?
    Actual employees, none. Wife and I are partners, she paints whatever engraving needs paint fill, does about 15% of the invoicing. My BIL comes in at 9, leaves at 3, he engraves flat work, plastic buttons, and whatever high qty jobs I set up for him to run. And he's my gopher. He has his own biz license so not an employee. My daughter comes in on Thursdays, she runs high qty jobs and such that I set up, gopher work... All other aspects of this business is my job...
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    I feel kind of lucky.
    2600 sq feet. One zone.
    all electric (induction cooktop is awesome)
    Monthly bill usually around $100. Highest was $238. Low was $13.

    just went on Medicare. Our biggest expense used to be health ins. My wife goes on Medicare in May. Whoopeeee!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Anaheim, California
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    I just looked at last year's totals: electric, water, sewer, trash collection, and gas totals out to almost exactly $200/month.
    The gas was about 15% of the total, the others are billed together so I didn't bother breaking them out.

    Two people in a 1750sqft house, not particularly well-insulated. (Well, I am, but the house isn't. )
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    One thing I have noticed through the years is that the people that try to keep their houses "cool" in the winter and "warm" in the summer to save money, are also ones that seem to be sick the most at work with every bug that goes around, especially in winter. It has been years since I've had a cold or flu bug. The ones trying to keep their houses at 62-64 through the winter are always sick at work. Just an observation.
    I keep my house at 71F and I am just getting over influenza. (Yes, had flu shot.) The number one reason that disease doctors give for more illness in cold weather is simply people being indoors all the time with groups of people.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
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    There was recently some media coverage locally about how the USDA wants to cut the allowance for utilities used to calculate SNAP benefits (food stamps). Currently, $490 per month for utilities is deducted from an applicant's monthly income to determine eligibility for SNAP benefits.

    These people are living in the wrong types of housing if they are spending an average of $490 per month on utility bills. This probably means $500 or more per month for just gas during the winter months. There is no chance you would ever catch me buying a house with almost $6,000 a year in utility costs. I was spending right about $1,450 per year for gas and electricity before I got my solar installed. I keep my house temps at 71F during heating season and 74F/75F during cooling season.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Brian, a lot of the housing that less advantaged folks live in is older, has less efficient systems, poor windows and doors and lacks modern insulation or air infiltration protection. Utilities also tend to be higher in urban areas where many disadvantaged folks live. My house is mostly modern, has decent insulation, almost all new windows (except in the 250 year old portion), on-site water and sewer and our utility costs exceed $6K a year based on averages for electric and gas. And as I noted we shoot for 68F during the heating season and 74F in the cooling season. Cost of housing is also difficult in many areas...we're currently exploring things to help our older daughter hopefully live independently real soon now. Rents for a studio sized apartment are no lower than $950 in our area and that's BEFORE utilities. She already lost her wopping $135 a month SNAP because of making $10 more than the limit with her part time job. (she is disabled and limited in what she can do) My point is that it's not easy out there and utility costs are more than many folks realize in many areas, regardless of socio-economic status.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-06-2020 at 5:49 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    I had a funny occurrence with our electric bill today, and remembered this thread, so came to tell the funny story. Evidently, my Wife and I have both paid the electric bill for a couple of months. She goes by what comes in the mail, and I probably had already paid them online. I went to the online account, to see if they had posted a bill yet, and found that we have an $824 credit, so we had overlapped payments some kind of way for a couple of months. I cancelled paper billing.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Anaheim, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    These people are living in the wrong types of housing if they are spending an average of $490 per month on utility bills.
    You say that like you think they have a choice.

    Hint: people in rental housing don't get to decide how much insulation or what appliances are installed.
    Yoga class makes me feel like a total stud, mostly because I'm about as flexible as a 2x4.
    "Design"? Possibly. "Intelligent"? Sure doesn't look like it from this angle.
    We used to be hunter gatherers. Now we're shopper borrowers.
    The three most important words in the English language: "Front Towards Enemy".
    The world makes a lot more sense when you remember that Butthead was the smart one.
    You can never be too rich, too thin, or have too much ammo.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    McDonald, PA
    Posts
    110
    We're in southwestern PA and built an 1875 sq. ft. 1 1/2 story home with a full basement in 1985. We have a beautiful view but sit on top of a very windy hill. Also have a large detached garage, 900 sq. ft. of which is a fully insulated woodshop. Went with all LED lighting a couple of years and currently paying $.053 KWH. Our average monthly bill is $95, but have a rate hike to $.073 that goes into effect next month. We have a well and septic, whole house a/c and heat with oil hot water (500 gallons a year). Refuse removal is $200 a year.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    1,631
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    There was recently some media coverage locally about how the USDA wants to cut the allowance for utilities used to calculate SNAP benefits (food stamps). Currently, $490 per month for utilities is deducted from an applicant's monthly income to determine eligibility for SNAP benefits.

    These people are living in the wrong types of housing if they are spending an average of $490 per month on utility bills. This probably means $500 or more per month for just gas during the winter months. There is no chance you would ever catch me buying a house with almost $6,000 a year in utility costs. I was spending right about $1,450 per year for gas and electricity before I got my solar installed. I keep my house temps at 71F during heating season and 74F/75F during cooling season.
    It is amazing how low your utility bills can be if you can afford to make it that way. Unfortunately, many do not have the means to do that.

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