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Thread: Removing sawstop top

  1. #1

    Removing sawstop top

    I've got a new 3HP PCS sitting on a trailer in my garage. I unboxed it, took all the parts into my basement shop, and got the main cabinet assembly rolled over onto the top piece of styrofoam (much nicer that they gave you instructions on getting it out like that vs when I flipped the top of my grizzly jointer to get it out of the crate).

    Right now it looks like the center section is just a little too big and a little too heavy to get it into the basement. I'm thinking the easiest way to move it will be removing the top. It looks like if I loosen the adjustment set screws, unbolt the pivot point holder from the top, and then remove the 4 bolts holding the top I'll have it separated into 2 pieces. I sent sawstop support an email about this within the past week, but I haven't heard back, and now I'm under duress from the wife to get the garage cleared for her to park in it tomorrow night.

    Anyone remove the top off the saw? Looks like afterwards the only thing I'll have to fully set up is aligning the miter slot to the blade, but the rest of the adjustments should hold to factory settings.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    50,997
    'In general" you can remove the top from a cabinet saw without messing up the "innards" and as you say, once you reinstall it, it's a matter of getting it back into perfect alignment with the blade. Sometimes there may be thin shims...but not always...so when you are removing the top, pay careful attention to the hardware and which corner what goes to be sure you get things back exactly as it came from factory commissioning. I don't know if there are any differences with SawStop (I don't own one) but I seriously doubt it since their claim to fame lives below the table.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Scarborough(part of Toronto|) Ontario
    Posts
    227
    Are you sure you have to take the top off? I have the same saw and when I got it (ten years ago now) a son in law and I managed to get it down into the basement.
    Good luck!

    Tim

  4. #4
    Tim, I'm not sure if I have to, but I want to be prepared in case it has to happen. I'm gonna get a coworker over tomorrow, and the 3rd person should mean we can fit it through the tiny hallway.

    Jim, the shims were my concern. If there are any, are they typically like a washer type shim, or would it be more like a piece of shim stock positioned somewhere between the top and the cabinet?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    158
    The SS uses a front pivot point and two adjustable pivot screws in the rear, one on either side to adjust the squaring to the blade. I would call SS support to get their input before breaking down the saw.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,772
    If by chance the width of a doorframe is the choke point, consider removing the door frame to gain some width. It's probably easier than resetting the top on the saw.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,264
    I’ve had the top of my sawstop off.

    It is setup as suggested above.

    Honestly can’t you just take the left and right wing off and leave the cast above the arbor.

    Getting back square to the blade is not rocket science but it is a bit of a chore. In some ways I find it good to get acquainted with out tools in such a way. Then we are not scared to tear into them when they are not producing the desired result.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    West Dundee, IL
    Posts
    3
    I had to do this when I moved my sawstop PCS into my basement workshop by myself. It was not hard at all to do or to get back into working order once everything was in the basement, just take your time in realigning the saw and always be safe when moving heavy equipment.

  9. #9
    Greg and Patrick

    If I'm following what you're saying, you're both agreeing my assessment of how to remove the top as far as accounting for the alignment devices is correct?

    Hopefully my coworker will be available in the next few hours, I think we can handle it with the top on, because even if I remove the top, my wife is still not going to be happy with helping me move it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    50,997
    Quote Originally Posted by Myles Moran View Post
    Jim, the shims were my concern. If there are any, are they typically like a washer type shim, or would it be more like a piece of shim stock positioned somewhere between the top and the cabinet?
    There very well might not be any shims, but as I noted. as you remove hardware from each corner, keep things together to optimize getting things back together. Any shims would "likely" be very thin washer like things based on posts here long ago that I remember, but who knows. They would only be used if there was something out of kilter with the casting to insure things remained coplanar when the bolts are tightened. Cast iron bends. Easily. Trust me on that. Just be really careful in your disassembly so you can catch anything that pertains to each mounting point.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    606
    Just faced this exact dilemma last month and decided to get a third helper instead of removing top. We used straps to attach the saw to the dolly and another set to ease the lifting and gently manage the steps. My basement steps have a 90 degree landing mid way which increases the difficulty but it was easier to make the turn with the SS for some reason.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    155
    When I had my SawStop ICS moved into the basement, I took the top off, removed the motor and two guys moved the pieces down for me. Reassembled everything smoothly, alignment checked out dead on. Glad I did it this way as I learned a lot about the saw and upped my confidence level. Then 3-4 months later after recovering from double knee replacements I got to use the SawStop for the first time. Very nice saw and happy with it to this day.
    Good luck
    Ron

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    272
    Aligining the blade to the tilt axis is not a simple procedure. The notice on page 67 that states "This alignment procedure is not intuitive" is correct. There are probably no shims under the table attachment bolts because the adjustment is not performed with shims. I gave up trying to correct this alignment using the procedure.

  14. #14
    Hey everyone,

    Its now in my basement, top came off to move it because I ended up carrying in with my wife. No shims as others have noted, and after removing the pivot point and loosening the alignment screws, the 4 bolts came off easily with my impact and it popped right off. If I had to do it again, I might leave the pivot bolted to the table. The pivot pin slips apart easily, and the piece bolted it to the table had some big slots for adjustability with the cap screws. This meant that even though I had loosened the adjustment screws 10 turns and tightened them the same, the front had a new setting and the rear had to be moved a fair amount.

    But I got it aligned (super easily too) within .002" on my indicator, and the angles alignment was within .004". Easy peasy.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    50,997
    'Glad that worked out, Myles!! Please become an SMC Contributor so you can post photos of that bad-tool in action!
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 12-29-2019 at 9:05 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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