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Thread: Beginner Table Saw

  1. #16
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That actually looks like a decent choice...it's a hybrid saw with most of the desirable characteristics of a cabinet saw with the flexibility to require more modest electrical. It also has a riving knife which I think is important. (most new saws do these days)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It also has a riving knife which I think is important. (most new saws do these days)
    Wow! I didn't realize the G0771Z doesn't have a riving knife. As a beginner I am thankful for any safety feature I can get!

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Revard View Post
    Thanks to everyone for your input! I have read each comment and greatly appreciate all of your advice. I am now looking at the G0833P and converting it to 110V. What I need for now is a saw that works 'out of the box'. Rewiring to 110V shouldn't be an issue for me, but please any and all advice is welcome.

    I am basing my decision on preventing current potential frustrations. If I decide I need 220V down the road then yes, it will be something I'll have to deal with. I don't think I'll ever get that advanced but who knows, and wouldn't it be nice to slice through anything I want without worrying about power. Currently adding 220V and a 3HP saw to my shop is just not reasonable, and I'll bite the bullet and pay the price later if need be.

    Any more thoughts on the G0833P?
    Justin, if you contact Grizzly customer service, they might rewire the saw for a small fee before they ship it to you. Doesn’t hurt to ask!

    If not, the instructions are posted with the saw information, which you probably already saw.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Denver
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    144
    Justin,

    My concern with the 833P is the motor size. For another $300 you can get into a true cabinet saw and have 3HP motor. As you can see from other comments above many of us started smaller and later changed to a bigger saw. I started with a used Delta contractor saw. After fighting the cheap fence for a while a moved to a Unisaw. That was a game changer. Once I have the space, I'll change again and get a large slider.

    I know it's hard to visualize the utility of various table saws when you're just starting out. If you have some love for the hobby and think you'll stick with it, this $300 extra is a small price to pay.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #20
    I think the 883 had the potential to be your forever table saw. Lack of power is not often an issue in my pretty extensive experience with 110V saws. And when it is, cleaning the blade or putting on the right blade has always resolved it for me. That includes >3 inch cuts in hardwood. If I was doing that for a living or really often, I would be thinking of a 3hp saw, however. The ~2hp saws will do it but feed rate has to be slow and the saw obviously doesn't love it. But the vast majority of my cuts are in 1 inch material and the 110V saws do that just as well as big ones. Even full 1 inch hardwood is not an issue unless the board misbehaves. I doubt more hp would solve wood warping issues. I have had success inserting a shim into the kerf of boards that wanted to pinch the blade.

    Anyway, I think you will get a lot of good service out of that saw.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    First off the G0771 does have a riving knife. I've posted a picture from Grizzly's site below. If 240v is out of the question for now then it's best to move on from that option. The biggest issue between the 771 and 833 seams to be the fence. The over blade dust extraction is nice but can be added later and moved to a newer saw if you do upgrade. For not much more you could get the 771 and a Shop Fox Classic fence. I thought I read a post or two by people who owned the 833, they would best answer the question of if the 833's fence is solid enough. The SF Classic is a copy of the fence used on most cabinet saws sold today.
    g0771z_det10-77eace2439ff216e31f822859b62dfc8.jpg

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hockenberg View Post

    My concern with the 833P is the motor size. For another $300 you can get into a true cabinet saw and have 3HP motor. ers,
    He doesn't have 240v power available.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Alberta
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    Everyone has 240 volt power available. That is if you are connected to electricity. Your panel is fed with it,two legs of 120 v. Double breaker,spit a buss and run a three wire,Bingo you have 240 v. Not sure why this is such a huge impediment for people to overcome.

  9. #24
    "I don't think I'll ever get that advanced but who knows," That line will elicit a few smiles. Upon starting, all felt they could control the impulse. You will swallow the hook. You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    765
    At my last house the garage was detached and the power was ran underground to it. The wire was a 120v 12/2 direct burial that was under the cement sidewalk between the house and came up through the slab in the garage. It wasn't until I replaced the sidewalk that I could add a 240v line. Even then the AC panel was one made by Sears that used obsolete breakers. What I did was have the power company disconnect the power so I could replace the panel. Yes, I had 240v and if I wanted to I could have just made a very long extension cord and tied it into the electric dryer circuit (so when it wasn't running I could use 240 in the garage). It's usually a case of how difficult and how expensive it would be to add a 240v circuit.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    Everyone has 240 volt power available. That is if you are connected to electricity. Your panel is fed with it,two legs of 120 v. Double breaker,spit a buss and run a three wire,Bingo you have 240 v. Not sure why this is such a huge impediment for people to overcome.
    Yes, 240v is most certainly available in the OP's home. But it may not be easily made available in his workshop space for any number of reasons. It's not always "bingo, run a wire" easy deal; it could be a rental, it could be on a slab with no good path to get the wire from the panel to the shop, etc. And most importantly, he asked about something compatible with 120v.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    Jim my point was simply that I find in life that a lot of people do not seem to realize that they do in fact have 240 volt power available. I have 27 years of experience as a certified journeyman carpenter and have done everything from renos to additions to houses,shops etc. Pretty well every scenario of how to get power to here or there,etc. So yeah I get it. As to something compatible with 120v my advice would be 1.5 h.p. as a sweet spot if you want to spend more time cutting wood than resetting tripped breakers. YMMV.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    sykesville, maryland
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    For years I used a craftsman cable drive saw. I certainly got good service from it. It was under powered and would throw a breaker on thick hardwood cuts. I replaced it with the gris 1023RWL. What a difference. The gris is a nice saw. A friend purchased the 771 because he had no 220V. He had issues with the fence and gris replaced it. I think he's happy with it now.

    I'm a big fan of 220V because most better performing tools are all 220. If you plan to stay where you are and better tools are in your future, look into getting 220 to your shop. You'll be glad you did. Pretty easy to do yourself for less than $100 per circuit.

  14. #29
    Thanks to everyone replying to this thread, I love the humor and advice. I was hoping to return with results and a review, but I'm not there yet. I have some issues and a major question. First the simple issues: (1) a weld on the mobile base failed and a set screw thread snapped off (2) hurt my back moving the saw, brilliant move (3) still need to rewire for 120V (4) I'm just down right apprehensive to even push a piece of wood through, I've never used a saw.

    My goal with this post is to receive table saw top maintenance advice. Using the link below you should be able to see all the pictures I have of the saw (and my incomplete shop). My MAIN concern is rust. I feel like I'm just sitting here watching my investment disintegrate into a pile of rust. When I got the saw home I cleaned the saw with mineral spirits. I then added a coat of Johnson's Paste Wax to the top and sprayed various moving parts with Tri-Flow lubricant. The saw table top has many spots that look like rust and some of them are pretty bad. I don't know what to do. A couple of days ago I cleaned the top with mineral spirits again and put on a really thick layer of paste wax hoping to 'stop the bleeding.' Please any advice is welcome.

    Otherwise really happy with the saw. See one picture where the nylon nub from the fence rubbed the paint down to the metal, what's up with that? Thanks to all.

    https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...WA?usp=sharing
    Last edited by Justin Revard; 01-23-2020 at 4:59 PM.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    That rust is a bummer man. I'm fortunate in that I don't have humidity concerns. A couple of things though. Before applying wax, or any other rust inhibiting coating, all that rust should be cleaned off. A razor blade scraper will make quick work of most of it & the remainder can be easily removed with a Scotchbright pad & a little mineral spirits or WD40. Wax isn't the best product to use where you have bad humidity. Fine Woodworking (or some other mag) did a test of a bunch of products & I can't remember the winner, but wax was not it. And that thick application will be a bugger to buff out. You'll probably need to use some mineral spirits to wash it off. I expect others will have suggestions for what product works best for them.

    As far as the worn paint goes, just learn to live with it. It's a tool, not a fine automobile & there will be lots more blemishes that develop with use.

    Oh, and congratulations on the new saw and sorry about the issues you had with setting it up. I suppose it would be crass and insensitive of me to mention what a pleasure it is to unpack & assemble a SawStop Since you are new to the table saw, be sure to educate yourself first. There are a ton of videos out there, some of which should NOT be watched. This guy https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/?po...e=&s=table+saw has several table saw related videos that I highly recommend. And use those safety devices!

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