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Thread: Teak Outdoor Chair

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
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    30
    Hola Lee.... just made a contribution and makes all the difference. Thanks..

    cheers...
    Achtung: Schlau Holz

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Elmer Hayes View Post
    Hola Lee.... just made a contribution and makes all the difference. Thanks..

    cheers...
    Thank you for becoming a contributor.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    505
    If you’re looking for something really durable (as in indestructible) have you considered Ipe? Much cheaper but still $16.99/BF at Woodworkers Source in Phoenix.
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    30
    Yes, Mark, have considered it. Thanks... still trying to figure of how many BDF (+-) to get for this chair. Don't want to overdo $$$. Always prefer actual lumber boards (less $ per BDF) where I plane and saw them myself. Woodworkers Source only carries planed, polished and sanded.

    The chairs dimensions are: H=31"xW28"xD(L)=29". Seat Height=12". So I take ca. 17 bdf, give or take of rough lumber! Could you expert guys chime in whether I am in the ballpark regarding BDF; and don't laugh . That's $288.

    Cheers...
    Achtung: Schlau Holz

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    8,886
    I never estimate lumber from rules of thumb. I draw out the parts I need, and add it all up. That's my gross lumber requirement. Then I add 20% or so because parts don't always lay out perfectly on the boards, so there's some waste. There also may be waste from end checks, included knots, and the like.

    If I'm working with exotic lumber, it may only be available in 4/4 or 8/4. That's apparently all that gets shipped to the US. So if the furniture needs parts that are, say, 1 1/4" thick, I'm going to have to buy 8/4 lumber, which also ups the bdft purchase. Ipe might be an interesting exception to my thickness generality. I've seen ipe decking, finish planed, at 1" and 1 1/4" thicknesses.

    From the pics, most of the lumber is thicker than 4/4. The legs and arms look to me like they're 1 1/4" or 1 1/2" thick. I think the big C-shaped pieces are 1 1/4" thick.
    Last edited by Jamie Buxton; 12-29-2019 at 10:12 PM.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    505
    Quote Originally Posted by Elmer Hayes View Post
    Yes, Mark, have considered it. Thanks... still trying to figure of how many BDF (+-) to get for this chair. Don't want to overdo $$$. Always prefer actual lumber boards (less $ per BDF) where I plane and saw them myself. Woodworkers Source only carries planed, polished and sanded.

    The chairs dimensions are: H=31"xW28"xD(L)=29". Seat Height=12". So I take ca. 17 bdf, give or take of rough lumber! Could you expert guys chime in whether I am in the ballpark regarding BDF; and don't laugh . That's $288.

    Cheers...
    When I was in high school, my folks used to build Adirondack chairs out of dimensional fir lumber (2x4’s, 2x6’s, etc). They were very sturdy and held up forever. Redwood would work well too.

    Fir is much cheaper and you could buy as much as you think you need. If you run short, then back to the store for more.
    Last edited by Mark Daily; 12-30-2019 at 11:01 AM.
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN.
    Posts
    201
    Cumaru (Brazilian Teak) will fit the bill....

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    30
    I've decided to chose Chichipate lumber from Woodworkers sources in Phoenix. Basic information is available on this wood, it also has some oil content and is heavy. Was encouraged to give it a try as compared to the $$$$ of teak and $$$ Ipe. Purchased about 25 bdf of a mix of 4/4-5/4-6/4 at a sale of $5.00/bdf. Will let you know of its durability in withstanding Northern Arizona outdoors.

    cheers...
    Achtung: Schlau Holz

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    984
    Showed my wife the chair, now she wants two. Previously I’ve made outdoor furniture with white cedar but the curved seat cries out for hardwood not cedar. Your wood choice looks very affordable. Getting the right wood seems the only obstacle.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    30
    Correct about getting the right wood! If the Chichpate does not do too well on the curved seats then might add a center 1/4" laminated strip of similar.

    cheers..
    Achtung: Schlau Holz

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    984
    If you come across a source of the brass fixtures for the slats I would like to know. Brass screw inserts are easy to find but the flat head round brass bolts are elusive but very classy. There may be a small centre thread in the bolt head to take a ‘Screw in by hand’ flat cover. Lee Valley have Chicago bolts with a slot on each side in a variety of lengths up to 41mm, not long enough for the seat slats.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  12. #27
    Wandered by the local Woodcraft yesterday, was actually looking for dust fittings but they had just unbundled a bunch of plantation Teak. I paid about $13.50 per bd ft. I don't know that other WC have the same deal, but maybe. Teak has been hard to come by here 'bouts, but seems much more available lately. That said, this stuff was not the stuff I have seen in Scand furniture for decades. Lots of boards with knots, one beauty with a nasty worm hole in the middle. Mine is for a project for a sis-in-law, overdue by ages, so it was a must buy.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    30
    Hmmnn..didn't see that when I got there last week. Instead was directed to try Cichipate (a bit close to teak.. heavy and oily.; $4.99 bdf; however must admit NOT too good for furniture. It easily cracks and splits even when counter sunk). Okay for floor furniture!. Should have taken IPE, but too late and I'll finish this via ChiChipate... and lotsa oilings !!??

    IMG_1756_heic-M.jpg

    IMG_1757_heic-M.jpg

    IMG_1758_heic-M.jpg

    cheers...
    Last edited by Elmer Hayes; 01-11-2020 at 7:38 PM.
    Achtung: Schlau Holz

  14. #29
    This load was still sitting on a pallet. Usually the local WC calls it right on species, and this was just labeled "Teak", so I don't know that it isn't the S.American version. At the price it is certainly not the uncultivated form. But same grain, same obvious heavy oil. I've repaired/refurbished Teak furniture in the past, and it can be challenge, definitely is not easy to glue.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by John Makar View Post
    ...Teak...definitely is not easy to glue.
    Very simple and easy to glue using WEST epoxy.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

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