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Thread: Rod rack project for my office

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Rod rack project for my office

    This is project number 7 on the axiom. No fancy jointery, just screws and glue. Now need to sand and apply finish.

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  2. #2
    Glad my wife isn't seeing your posts. You are getting way too much accomplished in a short period of time. They all look great. Looks like you are a natural.

  3. #3
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    Nice Job Greg! Keep up the good work.
    David

  4. #4
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    thanks guys. I’m having fun looking for ways to incorporate it into projects as I continue to learn. So far I’m not sure how I managed without one. LOL

    Quote Originally Posted by bobby milam View Post
    Glad my wife isn't seeing your posts. You are getting way too much accomplished in a short period of time. They all look great. Looks like you are a natural.
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Nice Job Greg! Keep up the good work.
    David

  5. #5
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    You're getting the hang of things very quickly! You're also clearly illustrating that the CNC can be a complimentary tool while still building things in more traditional ways.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Very nice work, Greg! How long did the project take to cut on the CNC?

    David
    David
    CurlyWoodShop on Etsy, David Falkner on YouTube, difalkner on Instagram

  7. #7
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    Very cool. The only limit with cnc is your imagination!
    Please help support the Creek.

    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
    - Steven Wright

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Falkner View Post
    Very nice work, Greg! How long did the project take to cut on the CNC?

    David
    Thanks David. It took about an hour to cut all 4 pieces. That included loading, setting the datum point, and run time.

    Here are a few more pics with some stain applied. Just need to spray some clear coat on it this evening to finish. Probably doesn't appeal to everyone but I wanted to make something fun, functional, and also with a little bit of older/weathered look to it. Something that reminds you of the old fishing cabin sort of speak.

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    Last edited by Greg Parrish; 12-12-2019 at 2:58 PM.

  9. #9
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    Gregg...having a CNC is very similar to the old "to a hammer, everything is a nail". Go with it!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
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    Well, it's finished and in place. Lots of things I would change if I were to redo it. Namely, I would have spaced the rods further from the wall. As it sits, they barely land onto my kicker plate that was supposed to pitch them back. To do this, I would need to add some additional spacing to the flat side of the fish to pull the whole rack out from the wall allowing the rod holders to move forward and the kick plate to move backwards. Also, I would look at making it wider like 36". My rack is 24" and my studs are 24". Thought they were 16" but alas they are not. Not only would it reach across two studs for mounting off the floor, but it would also better space the 8 rods so they are not as crowded. Lastly I would have taken the time to mill the lumber so that it is true and flat for better fit and assembly, and I would have routed pockets/slots for the boards during cutting of the fish so that they would assemble easier and without screws.

    Anyway, not a completely thought out project before jumping in but I'll live with it for now.

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    Last edited by Greg Parrish; 12-12-2019 at 6:03 PM.

  11. #11
    A very nice job, regardless. This is all part of the learning curve and these are points that you will now take into your next projects making them turn out even nicer. It seems that my full time job either keeps me too busy, I have orders that I must get carved or I am mworking on my machine doing upgrades and never have time to really dive into it and design some projects like you have. It took me 3-4 weeks to finally getting around to designing and making a new dust shoe for my ATC spindle and like you after I made it, I found flaws in the process and other steps that I wish I had done to make it operate better. I think that is the real draw to the CNC. It is cool to be able to draw something up on the computer and then sit and watch the machine cut out the parts perfectly and initially that is the fun part. Eventually, it really becomes apparent that nothing will ever come out perfect and your mind will constantly be thinking of new techniques to improve upon something every time you make it. It really gets into your creative side and keeps it fun and exciting.

    Save these pictures and come back and look at them in a year or so and compare it to your work quality then. That's when you will really see how far you've grown in the CNC world. Word of warning....be careful who you show these pictures to! If you are not careful, word of your secret machine will get out and next thing you know people will start ordering things from you and before you know it you'll be too busy making money that you lose your free time to just have fun.

  12. #12
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    Gregg, run prototypes for anything that depends upon angles like that, whether or not you're using CNC. Sometimes only a degree of angle can make a world of difference. For this, some cheap MDF and/or scrap and a forstner bit will help you structure things before you commit to the final design
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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