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Thread: New to me #7

  1. #1
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    New to me #7

    Iíve had my eye out for a traditional #7 for some time. Never having owned one, and getting into more stock prep of longer rough timber, it was time to get serious. Lo and behold, fellow Creeker Tom Davis posted one in the classifieds and I jumped on it. After receiving it in great condition (Thanks Tom!), it got a light cleaning and the Hock iron got a quick honing.

    I already love this thing. It appears to be a type 7, in really great user condition, and first impression is that this is going to be a great addition to the shop. Donít tell the LOML, but this is probably going to be the best Christmas present I bought for myself this year (ok, there might be a few more personal present purchases, but donít we all at this time?). And no, itís not going under the tree...it arrived when she was out of town and will live in the ďoh, jeez, Iíve had that foreverĒ cabinet.

    Itís producing full length, full width nice shavings. What can be better than that? Gonna be nice to work off a few Christmas cookies as well...itís a big plane to move.

    Not sure why I need to post this, other that to say Iím very happy SMC gives us all a chance to move old tools around.

  2. #2
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    It appears to be a type 7, in really great user condition
    Interesting, my #7 is also a type 7. It is the one cleaned up in my Junker to Jointer post. After it was cleaned up and working my type 11 #7 was sold.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Jim, itís a little in between types, I think. There appears to be two patent dates on the lateral adjuster, which might indicate a type 5 or 6, but it has an ďSĒ stamped into the body, which apparently was type 7. Might be a frankenplane, but nonetheless it works great.

  4. #4
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    Nice snag, Phil. A fin du siŤcle vintage of this venerable line. I've heard some say the Type 7 is the ideal realization of the plane, having incorporated the lateral adjustment and worked out its kinks.

    My Bailey (#5-1/2) is a Type 15, the one just before the frog went to the outline design (instead of flat) and the level cap went kidney-shaped. It's ideal for me, with its larger depth knob and frog adjustment screw (which comes in handy when I switch from the SW iron to the Hock). To each his own, right?

    I know you'll enjoy that sweet #7. Thanks for posting. I'm still kind of new here and haven't caught on that folks sell stuff on the Creek. I'll start paying attention.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Jim, it’s a little in between types, I think. There appears to be two patent dates on the lateral adjuster, which might indicate a type 5 or 6, but it has an “S” stamped into the body, which apparently was type 7. Might be a frankenplane, but nonetheless it works great.
    The earliest date stamped on the lateral levers is 2-8-76. That patent would have expired in approximately 1893. 1893 is listed in type studies as being the first year of type 7. There were likely some in stock at the time. This might indicate your plane was made a few years into the type 7 period.

    Is there any mark on the lever cap or under the frog?

    Some during that time period had a dot instead of a letter. These are referred to as type 6a by some. It is also when the depth adjusters were changed from right hand to left hand threads.

    My #8 has a 'B' on the base and an 'S' on the frog. It is a made up plane, but likely some were shipped from the factory that way. The folks at Stanley didn't know about any type studies.

    Some early type 9s have a patent date on the lateral levers left over from the type 8 years.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
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    I know you'll enjoy that sweet #7. Thanks for posting. I'm still kind of new here and haven't caught on that folks sell stuff on the Creek. I'll start paying attention.
    One of my bookmarks is for the Sawmill Creek Classifieds. Even though my intention isn't really to buy anything my mornings are not complete without taking a glance of the listings. Just recently a Stanley #103 was listed and got me to open my wallet. There are still a few things that would tempt me.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    Jim, the patent dates on the lever are a bit worn, but one is ďC2184Ē, which Iím thinking is 10-21-84, and the second is ď2488Ē, which is likely 7-24-88. There is an ďSĒ both on the body of the plane behind the frog and one on the frog. No other markings that I can find.

    I see why Stanley went to a larger adjuster wheel, as this smaller one is a little harder to turn...kind of a tight space in front of the tote. The lever cap just has the block Stanley logo. Some owner along the way used it to unscrew the chip breaker and itís a bit buggered up, but certainly doesnít effect the performance.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Jim, the patent dates on the lever are a bit worn, but one is “C2184”, which I’m thinking is 10-21-84, and the second is “2488”, which is likely 7-24-88. There is an “S” both on the body of the plane behind the frog and one on the frog. No other markings that I can find.

    I see why Stanley went to a larger adjuster wheel, as this smaller one is a little harder to turn...kind of a tight space in front of the tote. The lever cap just has the block Stanley logo. Some owner along the way used it to unscrew the chip breaker and it’s a bit buggered up, but certainly doesn’t effect the performance.
    Sounds like a type 7 with a replacement for the lever cap. A plane that works well is all that really matters.

    A long time ago there was a batch of large depth adjusters listed on ebay. My bid won and most of my earlier planes had the depth adjuster wheel upgraded. That makes most of my planes sort of Frankenplanes.

    It kind of offends me to see people still suggesting that it is good practice to use the lever cap for turning chip breaker screws. It works fine up until the first turn that breaks out a big hunk of lever cap.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
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    I like my #7. I found a super clean type 19 with rosewood knob and tote a few years back. It was in pristine condition save for a replacement (much older) lever cap. The bottom is flat and the mouth is nice and tight. I added a Hock iron and Chip Breaker but kept the originals. It gets very little use save for flattening large panels. I got it out this past weekend to true up my bench top. It sure is a load to haul back and forth for prolonged periods.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  10. #10
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    Rob, funny you should mention trueing up your bench top. Had that in mind as another justification to get this plane. It will be the first real use and Iím looking forward to it, albeit, a good workout as well.

  11. #11
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    IMG_2585 (640x480).jpg
    Front to rear...#8, and two #7 jointers. One is an Ohio 0-7 smooth sole, the other is a Stanley No. 7c, type 9.....the #8 smooth sole is a type 7...

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