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Thread: Bizarre dust from router... Any idea if normal?

  1. #1
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    Bizarre dust from router... Any idea if normal?

    Hello all,


    Yesterday, I used a new router along with a new trimming bit (FREUD 3/4" Downshear Helix Flush Trim Bit) on white maple. My jointer, which was located behind me got the most of it. The dust produced was very bizarre (but nice looking!).


    Has anyone ever experienced this? Any clue how to prevent it as it took me quite a while to clean up!

    IMG_6852.jpgIMG_6853.jpg

  2. #2
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    Those are shavings that seem to indicate there was a nice shearing action by the cutter which is to be expected from sharp, helix type tooling. You can't prevent it and it's actually a really good sign that you're getting a nice, clean surface. IE...you WANT this! You'll notice it more with certain species...some are more 'fluffy' than others (fine grain species) when you use this tooling while others tend to have the shavings fall apart into smaller pieces. (coarse grain species)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Those are shavings that seem to indicate there was a nice shearing action by the cutter which is to be expected from sharp, helix type tooling. You can't prevent it and it's actually a really good sign that you're getting a nice, clean surface. IE...you WANT this! You'll notice it more with certain species...some are more 'fluffy' than others (fine grain species) when you use this tooling while others tend to have the shavings fall apart into smaller pieces. (coarse grain species)
    Thanks Jim. Indeed, the shaving were quite nice and the bit was performing nicely. The router was connected to the dust extraction system. With this size of bit, it is normal that everything is not sucked in but my big problem is the nature of chips that stuck to things. As if they were charged with static electricity...

  4. #4
    Yep, that would be your downshear helix cut. Those chips are really staticky, especially in winter. I have that same problem when I take fine shavings with my smoothing planes, they stick to everything like wet kleenex.

    FYI, those shavings are also quite flamable, so be sure to never leave them lying about in a large pile, even though they are a pain to clean, as you found out

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Seemann View Post
    Yep, that would be your downshear helix cut. Those chips are really staticky, especially in winter. I have that same problem when I take fine shavings with my smoothing planes, they stick to everything like wet kleenex.

    FYI, those shavings are also quite flamable, so be sure to never leave them lying about in a large pile, even though they are a pain to clean, as you found out
    Thanks Andrew, noted! I wish a could produce such fine shavings with my hand planes! Lots more practice needed for sure

  6. #6
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    Any clue how to prevent it as it took me quite a while to clean up!
    Yep - - go to Lowes and pickup a Bosch 2" flush trim bit......the one I have can just dream about making cuts that fine.

    Ditto to what Andrew said about not leaving them around - - even in the shop vac after/when you suck them up.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  7. #7
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    The collection providing suction where the chips aren't isn't working. Put the dust collection hose where the chip spray is. Drill some holes in the router base. Screw a stick to the base. Hose clamp a vac hose on the stick, inline with the router chip spay.

  8. #8
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    Most router chip collection devices aren't designed with those shaving sizes in mind I think. Rockler sells an edge collection device that may work, it's a cup-like attachment.

    https://www.rockler.com/edge-routing-dust-port

  9. #9
    I always get very fluffy shavings from my Freud router bits.

    A shop vac might work better than you DC for collecting the shavings off your router. The vacuum will likely have more static pressure and better airflow through the small intake port of your router.
    Lee Schierer
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    Captain USN(Ret)

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  10. #10
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    Those shavings might clump and cling in your ductwork or hose. Might be better to position a cardboard box to catch them.

  11. #11
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    I agree with Tom. Also, you might spray the remnants with a fine water mist to help dissipate the charge. Of course, then you have to dry the surfaces of the machines. But it looks like they will need cleaning anyway.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Those shavings might clump and cling in your ductwork or hose. Might be better to position a cardboard box to catch them.
    Good idea!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Utterback View Post
    I agree with Tom. Also, you might spray the remnants with a fine water mist to help dissipate the charge. Of course, then you have to dry the surfaces of the machines. But it looks like they will need cleaning anyway.
    Hem, water near my machines... Not too sure about that! But indeed, it could help.

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