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Thread: Tenoner rebuild

  1. #1
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    Tenoner rebuild

    I recieved my second Wadkin JET tenoner this week. I have already stripped down the first one last year, and plan on stripping this one down in the near future. This will probable be a long drawn out thread, as i have just started rebuilding another Maka mortiser for a customer and have to get that finished first.

    The ones in the brochure are shorter versions with a small dust collector around the cutterhead, and no cut off saw.
    The ones that i have are larger models that have a cutoff saw and are therefore longer. plus they have a huge sheet metal cover, making them look huge.
    Wadkin very very creative and innovative at this time, they made a lot of well thought out innovative machines, they were not super heavy duty but built well enough to handle the intended jobs and be reasonable priced.

    The machine was designed for making window sash.
    This machine has three adjustable tables for mounting your stock, one shaper that handles a stack of cutters. the shaper travels past the three tables, cutting different tenons in each of the three pieces in one pass

    Jet1.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_1.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_2.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_3.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_4.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_5.jpgWadkin JET Tenoner_Page_6.jpg

  2. #2
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    Holly smokes mark you are a glutton for punishment ehy...

  3. #3
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    This will be good. Mark, any idea if the machine is exactly Wadkin or if Jet spec'd some differences, good or bad, from the original build? Dave

  4. #4
    This will be fun, do you have the full compliment of tooling with it? Did you hear that Jack got an ECA?

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  5. #5
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    Hi David.
    I don't think that it had anything to do with Jet tools. Wadkin made a bunch of machines with just 3 letter names. the Wadkin PAR was the combo two sided jointer and two side planer. Maybe short for Planed All Round. The Wadkin SET was for the "Single End tenoner" The name Jet was probably "Jointing end tenoner" or some such thing.
    I really like all three machines and would be quite happy to have all three.
    But for know i have theses JET machines and i am quite excited to get one together as i have a couple of projects in mind for them.


    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    This will be good. Mark, any idea if the machine is exactly Wadkin or if Jet spec'd some differences, good or bad, from the original build? Dave

  6. #6
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    Hi Brent, i do have a couple of stacks of blades, i may be able to use some, as i have a lot of windows to do for my house, plus i have special project in mind that i will need to buy tooling for.
    No, I didnt know that Jack got an ECA, he must be excited about that.


    Quote Originally Posted by brent stanley View Post
    This will be fun, do you have the full compliment of tooling with it? Did you hear that Jack got an ECA?

    B

  7. #7
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    This is the one that i stripped down last year, the new arrival has a similar blade stack.

    4-SAM_5674.jpg2-SAM_5687.jpg3-SAM_5703.jpg

  8. #8
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    The new arrival has the 8' long aluminum fences and the clamps and posts. which i din't get with the first one.

    20191204_180704.jpg2-20191129_142858.jpg

  9. #9
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    Cool! Watching with interest.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #10
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    Nice Mark! This will be a interesting restoration. Always been curious about these myself. During those years Wadkin broke away from the old style push - pull tenoners with horizontal heads. Probably to compete with the tenoners coming from Italy and Germany. The long fence will be nice for slot and tenon work on large frames.
    Tell me how the saw blade works on these? For example on a typical double hung there will be one tenon depth and 3 slot depths. Does the blade move in tandem with the fence for the different depths? Or Maybe a mechanical digital readout on the blade then you reposition the fence to that? That is how my Colombo tenoner worked but maybe Wadkin had a more clever solution since the UK market is mostly double hung or sash windows as they are called there.
    Looks like 40 mm shaft.

  11. #11
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    Hi Joe,

    The saw travels together with the shaper head. At this point i am much in the dark as to how it works for setup and adjustments. there are mechanical digital readout on the table heights, rulers and pointers for the table in and out movement. there are stops on the fences are ruler and pointers, and there were a forward stop system which has been removed from mine, i may be able to reproduce it if i find it would be useful. It consist on a 1" rods that about 3' long that go through the tables it has a 90 degree arm on the front and a handle on the back, it was for a front stop, as opposed to using the fences back stop. it is a flip stop type thing; So you push the rod forward until it stops against a preset collar, then rotate it 90 degrees so that the stop arm is vertical, then slide your wood forward up to the stop, engage the clamp, then rotate the stop down and retract the rod to begin the cut. I am interested to get one of these machines up and running to figure out how to use it. Not sure of the spindle size, i will check.

    You can see the long rods in these photos i found online. in the second photo you can see the stop bars on the end of the rods tucked in under the front of two of the table. One o the tables the stop bar is missing from the end of the rod.
    In this video clip that i just pulled of the internet you can get the general idea of how it operates. Not sure why the speed is inconsistent on the video. The feed speed is variable on these machines. The motors have brakes. The video is taken from the back of the machine.

    original (3).jpgoriginal (4).jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    Nice Mark! This will be a interesting restoration. Always been curious about these myself. During those years Wadkin broke away from the old style push - pull tenoners with horizontal heads. Probably to compete with the tenoners coming from Italy and Germany. The long fence will be nice for slot and tenon work on large frames.
    Tell me how the saw blade works on these? For example on a typical double hung there will be one tenon depth and 3 slot depths. Does the blade move in tandem with the fence for the different depths? Or Maybe a mechanical digital readout on the blade then you reposition the fence to that? That is how my Colombo tenoner worked but maybe Wadkin had a more clever solution since the UK market is mostly double hung or sash windows as they are called there.
    Looks like 40 mm shaft.

  12. #12
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    Wadkin made a two machine system for making windows.
    It consisted of the Jet end tenoner.
    And the VIP Multi head profiler.

    The Vip consisted on multiple shapers ganged together and tilted for running all of the profiles.



    The JET tenoner.

    0728dddc4ddc8456b65dcb76da47.jpg

    The VIP profiler

    2d8b42674e7e9f9083e35b18266b.jpg225e5e824e54bb884a78284a5110.jpg508759fc4d08b07c51d71034c1ec.jpge553a80e42d693bd5d1c4a8853bc.jpge658e3714deabb349216216712a8.jpgfa6112b24196906f3a002f4e97c2.jpg

  13. #13
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  14. #14
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    Mark, I talked to my friend in the UK that was a long time Wadkin employee. He worked in the Durham factory where these were made and said his brother is still running these machines in his works.
    I asked him what advantage these would have over the typical stacked shaft tenoners the Germans were producing in the same era. He said 2 up on each table could be run at the same time. So in production the casement frame which requires 2 different tenons (one for sill and one for head) and 1 slotting cutter for sill and head rails could be made faster than a movable stacked shaft where only 2 parts could be run at the same time vs 6 parts on the JET. Than a change of cutters for the sash which requires only one tenon cut and one slot cut.
    later the Germans and Italians went to 500mm plus shafts with top bearings so all the cutters for sash and frame could be stacked in one setting. I would think the Jet VIP machines would be more expensive to build than the stacked shaft machines.

    All my experience has been with stacked shaft machine for tenon and profile, semi automatic and then CNC. They have the advantage of compact size in my small shop. In semi retirement trying to be a part time pro and more full time hobby builder I am happy using shapers for this type work.

    Regardless of the pro and con this machine should be very capable to build windows!
    Last edited by Joe Calhoon; 12-07-2019 at 10:26 AM.

  15. #15
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    I was always quite impressed with the innovative drive Wadkin had at this time, they must have felt the pressure from the Italian and German companies who were pushing hard into the marketplace. I had that SAC tenoner in the shop a few years back, that was quite a bit heavier duty. T had two vertical shapers mounted in a common bracket and pivoted So you could swing one or the other into play, and there was a system of four vertical stop positions, effectively giving you eight machining positions. The motors moved in position hydraulically. It was a heavy duty machine and interesting. But i like the wadkin approach much better. I like the solid, fixed tables to mount the stock. and the fact that the head moves rather then the stock. I may play around with mine a bit, A will remove the large sheet metal covers, change the position of the electrical panel, i may remove the cutoff saw and shorten the length of the machine a couple of feet. Set it up like the original ones.

    I have tried a few different tenoners but I have never produced windows and i don't have any experience with these machines, did you use the cut-off saw or precut your stock to finish size? Would you miss a cutoff saw if it was removed.

    Looking at a large stack of cutters on a long skinny shaft with no top support is a tad unnerving at first, Its funny what you can get used to.
    I wonder what the limits are on shaft diameter and length before they went to top supports. 500mm is a long shaft. Those stacked cutters are seriously heavy.

    I have a bunch of windows to make for my old house. So maybe i will get around to doing them before the house falls down. I also have some furniture joints That i want to use the machine for, which I am really excited about. Anyway, it should all be fun.

    The Sac tenoner that i had a while back, these are the photos from the auction.

    1-SAC T8-1.jpg1-SAC T8-2.jpg3-SAC T8-3.jpg4-SAC T8-7.jpg5-SAC T8-8.jpg

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