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Thread: 8" Jointer, disassembled: What do the parts weigh?

  1. #1

    8" Jointer, disassembled: What do the parts weigh?

    I'm soon going to pick up a used 8" jointer.

    I don't have anyone to help me, and the owner has a bad back.

    Because I'm going over several bridges, I'd rather not rent a flatbed trailer, plus I'm not sure a rolling base would ever make it up the ramp. So, I'm hoping I can just take it apart (I'd want to refurb it, anyway) and load it into my capped pickup truck.
    Both tables, the fence, and I guess the motor.

    But will be able to manage those by myself?

    Does anyone know the approximate weight of these pieces, on an "average" Taiwanese 8" jointer?
    It's a dovetail unit, seemingly a Delta clone, & has a 72" bed.


    thx.

  2. #2
    Sellers of heavy stuff always have a bad back

    Looking at the grizz 8 x 72 dovetail jointer: it comes in two chunks, the machine and the stand (probably with motor). They quote 390 lbs shipping weight for the machine and 132 lbs for the stand. The machine comes in a crate so say 50 lbs for that makes the machine itself something north of 300 lbs. If you break it down into three pieces, infeed, outfeed, and base/fence, each are probably somewhat over 100 lbs.

    Only you can say if that's manageable. I'd probably rent/borrow/buy a folding engine lift to get the pieces into the truck. (and it would be helpful for taking the machine apart too) You should be able to move them to the truck with a two wheeler. Hopefully it's not in a basement!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Allen ,figure out how to get the machine to your truck in one piece then open the tailgate and position one of the tables over the tailgate. At this point separate the base from the jointer and pull the tables,fence into the truck. Now just load the base-motor. A pallet jack ,pieces of pipe etc all come in handy. How close can you get to where this is to be loaded? I always bring 2x4 pieces 2' to 4' long at least 8-10 pieces. Also a impact driver and cordless skilsaw. With this stuff it is easy to "find a way to get it in the truck".
    Last edited by Mike Kees; 12-04-2019 at 7:58 PM. Reason: additional information

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    So Cal
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    You should be able to manage all the parts.
    All metric sockets a good set of pliers screws drivers and crescent wench.
    Sounds like a good project to learn from. If you can get all back together and it cuts flat boards you get five gold ⭐️
    Aj

  5. #5
    Thanks, guys.

    It turns out, the seller has an engine hoist, so that sure helps. - but my truck has a cap, so still a little tricky.

    My biggest problem is what to do when I get home. I do NOT have a hoist, and even if I bought one, I'd have no place to store it. Ughh. - I sure wish I did.

    Well, 3 pieces at ~ 100 lbs or less is certainly manageable. And the base can be angled over and flipped in / out, so I guess I'll be good.

    As per Mike's post, I'm going top make some long ramps. that should help getting it OFF.

  6. #6
    You might consider a 1-day rental of a Penske or similar truck with a liftgate. The rates can be pretty reasonable for just a few hours of use -- and you'd save hours of work and potential hassle.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    My 8" Delta two big guys loaded it upside down into my pickup truck. But I separated the base from the top. The top part was upside down for the trip with the guard off. I have removed the infeed table to clean the gibs. I would guess 75-100 pounds. it is a bit tricky since it was dirty. It stuck and had to be carefully supported so the angles stayed inline .
    Do not use the tables as handles or levers. You will break off the dovetails and ruin the machine.
    Bil lD

    As I remember I just cranked the table down all the way until the screw came out of the nut. Then I just pulled and wiggled it down and off. Do yourself a favor and have a milk crate and some 2x scraps under the table to catch it when it suddenly comes free and tries to swing down uncontrollably and break itself into pieces. If possible remove the gib and put it safely away before removing the table.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 12-04-2019 at 10:57 PM.

  8. #8
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    Do as Bill says, but use the engine hoist to secure the beds while removing them so they donít fall off. 100 pounds a piece sounds about right.

    Bring ziplock bags and a sharpie to label all small parts. Take pictures too.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    My 8" Delta two big guys loaded it upside down into my pickup truck. But I separated the base from the top. The top part was upside down for the trip with the guard off. I have removed the infeed table to clean the gibs. I would guess 75-100 pounds. it is a bit tricky since it was dirty. It stuck and had to be carefully supported so the angles stayed inline .
    Do not use the tables as handles or levers. You will break off the dovetails and ruin the machine.
    Bil lD

    As I remember I just cranked the table down all the way until the screw came out of the nut. Then I just pulled and wiggled it down and off. Do yourself a favor and have a milk crate and some 2x scraps under the table to catch it when it suddenly comes free and tries to swing down uncontrollably and break itself into pieces.
    If possible remove the gib and put it safely away before removing the table.

    Thanks Bill!

    But one stupid question: I know what the gibs are, but how would I remove them BEFORE pulling the tables off? Do they just slide down if loosened?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Iíll go against the grain here. I picked up a used 8inch Grizz jointer off a guy nearby. At the time I had a SUV. We took the fence off and put that in the car. Then we took the table off the stand and between my wife and I, lifted it into the car. Finally the stand, which was probably the hardest (as it has the motor). Find a friend and youíll have no trouble at all. An 8inch jointer isnít a 12inch where the tables get exponentially heavier.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Western PA
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    Im with Ben, I would happily pay someone to accompany me and move it quickly and efficiently rather than disassemble it into 300 parts. The easiest and best way is to rent a $20 uhaul trailer and move it with a mobile base or furniture dollies, in my opinion. Whats up with bridges that you dont want the tool exposed?

    My brother and I had to carry a DJ-20 out of a slightly below grade shop years ago, and that would be a chore for one person. Two people can move the machine pretty well, however. Once you go above 8", man power alone isnt an option.

  12. #12
    I just took delivery of a grizzly g0656 so I think I can shed some light here. The base with the box was 130 lbs or so. That was fairly easy for me to move around, and getting it down some stairs wasn't bad at all. With the fence, fence support piece, all those accessories, etc removed, I'd put the jointer itself at 200-225 lbs. I could deadlift if a little if I tried, but I certainly wouldn't be lifting it up into a pickup truck by myself. I could, however, lift each end with one hand while using the other to degrease it all. That was easy. If I were you, I'd think it's possible to rig up some sort of ramp to slide it into the truck off the base.

    If I took it apart, I think the heaviest piece would be well under 100 lbs. It might be a bit awkward to lift it though. Just make sure to take careful note of which gib goes with which table and how it was installed. You don't want to reassemble it with trial and error.

  13. #13
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    If I took it apart, I think the heaviest piece would be well under 100 lbs. It might be a bit awkward to lift it though. Just make sure to take careful note of which gib goes with which table and how it was installed. You don't want to reassemble it with trial and error.[/QUOTE]

    I am a fan of spray painting or magic marker for stuff like that in place before taking it apart. It also helps to get things aligned on reassembly. use a logic to the color: right side= red, left side=lavender. Top is tan, blue is bottom, etc.
    My camping gear is color coded TENT is in a tan box, sleeping BAGS in a blue box. etc.

  14. #14
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    I can't help myself. Could you please explain the logic of no trailer usage on a bridge?

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    OP said he didnít want to rent a trailer and was going to take it apart anyway to clean it up.

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