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Thread: How best to attach legs to this desk?

  1. #1

    How best to attach legs to this desk?

    I'm working on a pair of desks using the plans drafted by the man who designed and built this desk:

    Desk.jpg

    I have much of the casework complete and the legs are already milled.

    My remaining question is how best to affix the legs to the case.

    The only differences between the desk in the photo and the ones I'm constructing is that mine are a bit beefier -- just a few inches longer (the main case is 41" long) and the walnut I'm using has an actual thickness of ~22mm (about 0.85") for all the parts of the case and the legs.

    I believe in the original (in photo), the legs are attached with screws from the outside, with the holes filled with matching plugs.

    I like to avoid screws when I can, but I realize they are likely the most sound method of affixing these legs. Would any domino (mid-size, or even up to the 10mm--the largest that can be used in the Domino 500) suffice, or would that be too risky?
    Last edited by Jay Michaels; 12-02-2019 at 4:01 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Glue. You have a nice big glue area. If you want, you could add screws, with the head on the inside. But they’re not really necessary.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Screws from the inside.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Perth, Australia
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    Screws from the inside, along with glue ...









    I had reservations at the start, originally planning to use loose tenons. It turned out to be a very strong join.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    My retro vinyl record stand I made for a commission awhile back had a similar leg arrangement. I put threaded inserts in the inside of the leg assembly and use bolts from the inside of the case to hold the leg assemblies to the body. The further advantage was that it was then technically "knock down" should the client ever need to move it and want to take advantage of disassembling. Here are a few photos from that project that might be helpful to you.





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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    Yeow! that desk has a Huge cross grain problem. The sides vs the top, bottom and shelf will cause problems if not dealt with in the joinery. Derek has built his desk with the grain running around so it all moves together. Yours needs to be joined in a way to let the lengthwise parts float relative to the side parts. Could you redesign to follow Derek's example?

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Yeow! that desk has a Huge cross grain problem. The sides vs the top, bottom and shelf will cause problems if not dealt with in the joinery.
    That's a good point as in order for it to work well with seasonal movement, the top and bottom panels will need to be able to move independent of the side panels. There are a number of ways to do that, but all of them involve some precise work that allows movement without impeding structural strength.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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