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Thread: Tablesaw dust colelction hood design theory

  1. #1
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    Tablesaw dust colelction hood design theory

    I have a 12/14 cabinet saw that i have the top off right now. I am going to drill a 6" dc port in the back of the cabinet directly in line with the blade. I almost never tilt the blade. So it is better to make a dust hood optimized for 90 degree cuts or make it so it also does something if the blade ever gets tilted?
    Bill D

  2. #2
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    Honestly, Ive never worried much about below table dust collection. The above table dust is what gets in your gave and lungs. Currently have my saw raised up about 3-4 and have a floor register on one side with a 6 duct that I turn on every few weeks to collect the dust that fell below. Before that I just vacuumed it out with a shop vac when I started to fill up.

  3. #3
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    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
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    Makes sense Matt, I hadn't really thought of it quite like that before (I've always opted for a "collect from below AND above" approach previously, but can see the value in what you suggest too)
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  4. #4
    I had an old Martin that didn't tilt. As such, it had a substantial shroud built around the lower half of the blade for dust collection. With a good dust collector, it caught close to 100% of the chips that came off the blade. Remember that all the chips flying off the top off the blade are chips that started inside the cabinet.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I had an old Martin that didn't tilt. As such, it had a substantial shroud built around the lower half of the blade for dust collection. With a good dust collector, it caught close to 100% of the chips that came off the blade. Remember that all the chips flying off the top off the blade are chips that started inside the cabinet.

    I like that theory!
    Bill D.

  6. #6
    I have an older blue Jet cabinet saw with a 4" port on the side. I have it connected to a central dust collector.
    This summer I was working in someone else's shop who has a Sawstop which has a shroud inside the cabinet around the blade assembly. It was amazing to me how much better the dust collection was on that saw. Further to Johnny's point, even though that particular Sawstop had no overarm dust collection, there was still very little dust anywhere around the saw, which I attribute to the under cabinet shroud capturing it before the blade could throw it up top.

  7. #7
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    I am assembling my new-to-me Sawstop PCS that came with the overarm dust collector. Have not tried it out yet but, as Edwin says, the dust collection is supposed to be very good.

    A general rule for source control in ventilation design is to enclose the entire process and then only remove those parts of the cover that are needed for operation. The below table shroud seems like the best solution.

    On a larger saw like yours, I wonder if cutting a slot in the table insert would better collect dust from the top that can be a problem when the piece being cut does not extend to both sides of the blade guard. The slot would need to be large enough for sufficient air velocity but small enough to not weaken the insert. As such, it may not be possible.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I had an old Martin that didn't tilt. As such, it had a substantial shroud built around the lower half of the blade for dust collection. With a good dust collector, it caught close to 100% of the chips that came off the blade. Remember that all the chips flying off the top off the blade are chips that started inside the cabinet.
    +1 ^^^ Seems like I get very little dust above the deck during normal use. That is, assuming the DC is not some shopvac or 5-gallon bucket/close enough/right size hose/etc.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  9. #9
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    Mar 2003
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    I like the 6" port idea. When I changed the hose on my Unisaw from 4" to 6" necked down to a Delta 5" factory port, there was a very noticeable difference in dust collection

    Where I used to have to get accumulated dust out of the cabinet with the 4" hose, it now hardly has any remaining inside, and I blow it out with the DC running about once a year.

    For those few who might be wondering. Yes, I still have the Unisaw. I use it mainly for heavy rips on construction lumber, and dado's. I also have a few jigs that work on it. Bought it new in the '80's and will probably keep it forever.
    Last edited by Rick Potter; 12-02-2019 at 10:35 PM.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
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    Ok, light bulb moment here. Most of the dust that escapes from a table saw has already toured the space under the table and has mostly ridden the blade back up the other side and launched into our faces. Let's capture it when it is 'down under'. So Martin and Sawstop have shrouds that do this, can someone post some pictures of this Aussie wonder?

    This can be way better than overhead collection.

    Tom

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