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Thread: Lubrication for wood drilling?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    McKinney, TX
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    Not sure how it would work on a deep drilled hole but I used a “cool gun” I bought from MSC to keep router bits cool when making 100 ds of feet of rope molding. It runs off the air compressor and drops the temp about 70 degrees.
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  2. #17
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    I might take a look at the type of drill, and tip geometry in particular. You’re drilling end grain, and that’s a whole different animal. I like the Forster bit idea, or perhaps modify a brad point by grinding the shank down 1/16” except for 1/2” or so at the tip. At least then the only friction that will develop is at the business end.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  3. #18
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    Dec 2007
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    Minot, ND
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    Seeing as how you’re drilling a 3/4” hole, I’d try drilling it in multiple steps. Using the 3/4” drill, I’d drill about 1/2” to 3/4” deep only. I’d the switch to a smaller bit like a 7/16 or 1/2” bit and drill to full depth. Finally, I’d switch back to the 3/4” brad point and finish the hole. By primarily paring the hole with the large brad point drill it is less likely to overheat the bit.

    As always, YMMV

    Clint

  4. #19
    I'd use the same stick lube that I use on my bandsaw blade if I needed to in this drilling scenario.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Fournier View Post
    I'd use the same stick lube that I use on my bandsaw blade if I needed to in this drilling scenario.
    What is this lube?

  6. #21
    Shot in the dark here, but I wonder if you would have better success with the Wood Owl auger-like bit like these from Japan that Lee Valley sells:

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...-wood-owl-bits

    The description says they have a PTFE coating to reduce friction. They seem reasonably priced to me. I believe you can get them on Amazon also where you can also read reviews from others. I notice the bit you are using now is not a very polished flute which is another reason I think these ones might make a difference. Hope this helps,

    Edwin

    BTW, the 3/4" diameter is available in 7.5" or 18" length!
    60J0140-set-of-3-wood-owl-bits-1-2-inch-3-4-inch-1-f-01-r.jpg
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 12-01-2019 at 7:40 PM.

  7. This concept also depends on the end use and finishing of the work piece? If it didn't matter you could use a hard paste wax. I'm currently building a large rocking chair from osage orange wood which creates lots of heat even with a sharp brad point bit as my rung holes are 5/8" and rockers and arms use 3/4". Takes a serious push too but no lube involved except "elbow grease"!

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    Shot in the dark here, but I wonder if you would have better success with the Wood Owl auger-like bit like these from Japan that Lee Valley sells:

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...-wood-owl-bits

    The description says they have a PTFE coating to reduce friction. They seem reasonably priced to me. I believe you can get them on Amazon also where you can also read reviews from others. I notice the bit you are using now is not a very polished flute which is another reason I think these ones might make a difference. Hope this helps,

    Edwin

    BTW, the 3/4" diameter is available in 7.5" or 18" length!
    60J0140-set-of-3-wood-owl-bits-1-2-inch-3-4-inch-1-f-01-r.jpg
    Definitely, going to try one of these.

  9. #24
    Please report back if/when you try those bits, especially if you experiment with different speeds. I am thinking slower would be better. I've been interested in them for a while, particularly for angled holes.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,683
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Definitely, going to try one of these.
    II haven't tried the Wood Owl bits but if they are anything like the Irwin Speedbore bits (https://www.irwin.com/tools/drill-bi...rt-length-bits) be advised that those are quite aggressive, especially in side grain. I'm gussing not so much in end grain. I use the Irwin bits exclusively when boring holes in construction lumber to run wiring.

    JKJ

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    Bits with a lead screw will need to run at really slow speed, they are great with a hand brace. But they will not work on end grain, the threads will be unable to pull the cutting edges thru and they will strip. However they should work about as well as your current spur bits.

    For that much drilling in end grain you will need to sharpen occasionally. Might as well learn to do it before you start. Factory edges are not usually optimum so you can start out better than new.

    Some type of lube should help but it will have to be applied often. Keep it in a pot by the press and apply with a brush. Protect your work with tape or plan to saw off 1/4" after drilling. Caution, the lube may seep thru the wood and ruin the finish for the top 6" of the part.

    Holes drilled in steps from small to larger may drift and you don't have much room for that. Forstner bits may drift less as they guide from the sides not the point. Test a few first.

  12. #27
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    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    You're asking that bit to run very true. Can you get a better grip on it, bigger chuck and saw off that reduced shank?

    Also you will want that fixture to move not at all from one to the next so fasten half of it in place and dowell the other half to it. Then fasten the clamp in place to speed your setup.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    You're asking that bit to run very true. Can you get a better grip on it, bigger chuck and saw off that reduced shank?

    Also you will want that fixture to move not at all from one to the next so fasten half of it in place and dowell the other half to it. Then fasten the clamp in place to speed your setup.
    True, I did run into problems with the bit running out. So I ditched, the chuck and went with a 3/8 collet. Looks like none of those auger bits are going to be an option, but the brad point muscled it's way through a hundred or so holes without too much problem.

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