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Thread: how to anchor to wall

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    OK , I guess if you tightened the screw "almost snug" then when you slipped the keyhole fastener on you could get it tight. Might take a bit of trial and error but doable.
    Exactly...you have to sneak up on it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    I make some wall cabinets that get a bit hefty. When I cannot find a stud I use Roc-Locs, key hole receivers and do the "snug" method described. No failures and I have been using them for years. I also use them for large/heavy mirrors.
    I am familiar with modern idioms but they are outside the vocabulary of what I want to say.

    - George Dyson (composer)

  3. #18
    Thanks all for the suggestions. I am currently using this type of anchors (https://www.amazon.com/TOGGLER-SnapS.../dp/B0051IAO3E) and kids are too rough when pulling the towel of the rack. They pulled out the anchor and a piece of drywall along

    I will give the keyhole a try. Given I am making them I can align the keyholes to the stud location. One advantage of custom DIY made items :-)

  4. #19
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    Aligning with the studs "should" solve the kids hanging on the thing problem for the most part!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
    My commercial experience says to use a French cleat toggled to the drywall. I try to never rely on hitting a stud and have seen too many fixtures just rip right out the wall. I would machine the hanging side of the cleat right into the back of the piece.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    My commercial experience says to use a French cleat toggled to the drywall. I try to never rely on hitting a stud and have seen too many fixtures just rip right out the wall. I would machine the hanging side of the cleat right into the back of the piece.
    While I like French cleats for some applications, for something as light as a towel rack I'd be concerned the rack may lift off the cleat if someone lifts a towel off and the towel get caught on the rack.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    It says right in the video that you have to tighten the screw until it is snug, how do you slip the keyhole fastener over the screw if it is snug against the wall?
    With the metal keyhole fasteners, there is a slight taper on the slot that will lock the screw head in place. You can see that taper in the photo above in Edwin's post
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  8. #23
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    Dec 2005
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    Guys - there is no access to the anchor - how on earth would a toggle or roc loc or whatever else you are suggesting work in this situation? And a French cleat would lift off. Please consider the OP’s application instead of just suggesting your favorite drywall anchor that wouldn’t work in this case.

  9. #24
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    Matt, a French cleat or keyhole type hanger can be used to carry the weight with one or two fasteners in conspicuously used at the bottom of the wall hung system to "keep it down". One does not have to rely only on the French cleat or keyhole type hanger for everything.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
    Yes a French cleat with a couple of screws from below to secure the towel holder to the cleat would resolve the lift off issue. Once the French cleat is attached to the wall with the toggle there's no need to access the anchor. With a keyhole bracket, if the screw is left slightly proud (not fully snug) a keyhole bracket can snug it up without any need for access.

  11. #26
    I just got done repairing 3 towel racks at my daughters house. The house was new construction 4 years ago. The towel racks were attached with plastic anchors in Sheetrock which all pulled out. I made nice looking 1x3 boards, stained and finished that were longer than the racks, screwed them to studs and then screwed the racks to the 1x3.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
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    keyhole.

    i find some things on etsy, like the towel bars made of black pipe for 100 each to be quite funny.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    While I like French cleats for some applications, for something as light as a towel rack I'd be concerned the rack may lift off the cleat if someone lifts a towel off and the towel get caught on the rack.
    That's what a dab of adhesive or a couple of micropins arw for.

  14. #29
    Maybe double sided tape?
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    That's what a dab of adhesive or a couple of micropins arw for.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Midwest
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    I'm not sure if someone else linked to it previously but don't use toggle bolts, use "Togglers". Togglers require a smaller hole (1/2" instead of 5/8" IIRC) than toggle bolts or butterflies and will work fine with a keyhole fixture. They don't have to be tight to drywall for support because they have a zip tie collar that holds everything tight to the wall. They will hold several hundred pounds each in drywall or 600-800# each in concrete block. You can also remove the 3/16"/#10 screw without losing the fastener "wing" in the wall. Good stuff!

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