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Thread: Keller dovetail jig repair

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Canaan, NH
    Posts
    255

    Keller dovetail jig repair

    Just got the Keller 1500 jig yesterday and have been practicing on my router table. Unfortunately, at one point I had the tail bit set too low so the bearing missed and put a "divet" on the inside of one of the fingers. It may turn out not be a problem but I'm wondering if anyone else has done this and if so, can it be filled and sanded with epoxy or something?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    518
    I'd use JB Weld to fix it. I've used that on motorcycle (aluminum) clutch covers, while out dirt biking, after we put a rock through the case. Bonds very well and can be filed smooth.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    198
    Agreed, JB Weld would be a good option for this repair.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont (Home Town Cincinnati, OH)
    Posts
    243
    I asked the same question to David Keller recently, below is his parsed response.

    ”...It is, then, important to keep the template edges clean and intact. However, a minor knick in either the aluminum or phenolic plate can be repaired, filling it with a high-density epoxy putty such as J-B Weld. It makes an excellent and long-lasting repair”

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,336
    JB weld worked on the aluminum guide finger of my jig.
    Bill D

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Canaan, NH
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    I asked the same question to David Keller recently, below is his parsed response.

    ”...It is, then, important to keep the template edges clean and intact. However, a minor knick in either the aluminum or phenolic plate can be repaired, filling it with a high-density epoxy putty such as J-B Weld. It makes an excellent and long-lasting repair”
    Straight from the "horses mouth."

    Seems like a consensus!

    Thanks everyone!

  7. #7
    I did a similar oops with my router jig. I purchased some PC-7 two part epoxy, mixed up the amount needed, pressed it into the divot, leaving enough excess that I could come back after it set up and dress the finish to the exact shape needed with a regular file. It has stayed in place for more than 10 years with no issues.
    pc-7.jpg
    A trick I learned when working with this epoxy is that you can smooth the surface with a wet finger.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 11-21-2019 at 9:22 PM.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

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