Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 38 of 38

Thread: Handplane vs Lunchbox

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,216
    Wood River No. 62....right out of the box.

    Angle of the bevel is the exact same as the one in my Stanley No. 60-1/2......and, that low angle block plane doesn't tear out.
    the 62.jpg

    Works fine...on straight grain Pine....except...I usually work with 1/4 sawn Ash.
    smooth plane.jpg
    And much prefer my planes to be bevel down...even with this Maple....

    So..I usually stick with what WORKS for me....and can care less about how other theorize about fancy angles.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,849
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Wood River No. 62....right out of the box.

    Angle of the bevel is the exact same as the one in my Stanley No. 60-1/2......and, that low angle block plane doesn't tear out.....

    ....I usually stick with what WORKS for me....and can care less about how other theorize about fancy angles.
    Steven, well this explains why you get such poor results on anything other than straight grained pine.

    Your cutting angle is 37 degrees (12 degree bed plus 25 degree bevel). That is far too low for interlocked grain. It is a recipe for disappointment on anything but end grain and cross grain planing. (by contrast, a Stanley #4 has a 45 degree cutting angle - even without the cap iron it is ahead of the game in this instance).

    Just to satisfy your own curiosity, add a 50 degree secondary bevel to your blade, and try it again ... on the most interlocked board you can find. I mostly use BD planes these days however, if set up correctly, BU planes will consistently produce very high quality performances on the most difficult woods. You plane has such unlocked potential. It would be wasted as a scrub plane.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,216
    Well....for ONE thing....I consider the 62 merely a Jack plane...and it will be used as just that. Have enough #3 and #4 sized smoothers, anyway.

    Not everyone feels the "need" to use difficult wood, unless to show off. Have more than enough "fun" with the Curly Maples, the White Oaks, the Quarter sawn Ash....that the Flame grained Cherry, and Black Walnut that comes through here seem tame. Even my BD planes use just a single bevel....without any need for complicated extra bevels, that only dull faster than a cheap putty knife.

    That plane...was merely a "Door Prize" I won at a meet & greet. Feel zero "need" to unlock anything about it....it has enough trouble holding a setting long enough to joint an edge...without making it into a beveled edge....very poor for doing a glue joint.

    I do have a decent Millers Falls No. 14, with zero camber, that works circles around the 62. At one time, I also had a #3 York Pitch smoother. Failed to find anything "special" about that one, either.
    shop.jpg
    Friend of mine now has my old Lunchbox planer....every now and then, I slip over there, buy some rough stock off of him....sometimes, we even run a few boards through. Though..
    slab.jpg
    Some won't quite fit through the planer....8/4 White Oak....
    Just don't have the room to use it in my shop....the planer, that is...which was also the OP's question.

    Could really care less about all the sales hype going with those fancier planes....don't really are for the plane design, anyway.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    20,383
    Blog Entries
    1
    Not everyone feels the "need" to use difficult wood, unless to show off.
    For some folks, difficult wood is the only thing available locally. To me the Pacific Northwest is full of easy to work wood. Many of the firs are easy to work. The woods like poplar and alder are also usually easy to work. Even though poplar and alder are considered hardwoods, they are not hard like maple, oak, ash or walnut. They are certainly not difficult like the lumber grown down under. With all the rain we get here the wood grows much faster which seems to add to the ease of working.

    Some of my early work was done on harder woods. That was mainly because my job was selling paper and the shipping pallets were usually made from eastern hardwoods. The wood was seconds at best and difficult to work. My early days of woodworking required my scavenging and dismantling pallets for building material.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 12-08-2019 at 3:00 AM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post

    During my working days one of my woodworking co-workers was alway touting his power planer. One of the claims was it could remove 1/16" in a single pass. One of my counters to this in the shop where we worked was to hang a long translucent shaving over my work area. One day we were talking. The conversation turned to woodworking. When asked about his latest project, he replied he wasn't doing anything at the moment because he needed his planer blades sharpened. He then asked if this might be something my setup could handle.

    jtk

    For some reason this reminded me of a book I read when I was maybe 10, that described a meeting (fictitious I believe) between Richard the Lion Heart and Sultan Saladin during the Crusades. The story goes that they compared swords. King Richard took a thick iron bar and with a huge swing of his heavy broadsword cleaved the bar in two. Saladin, instead took a silk scarf and threw it in the air. As it fell, Saladin cut in neatly in half with a swift stroke of his razor sharp scimitar. The two, who had earlier scoffed at the apparently ineffective weaponry of their adversary, left with a new-found respect.

    Sorry, just thought the analogy was too similar.

    Cheers,

    Dom

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    20,383
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik Dudkiewicz View Post
    For some reason this reminded me of a book I read when I was maybe 10, that described a meeting (fictitious I believe) between Richard the Lion Heart and Sultan Saladin during the Crusades. The story goes that they compared swords. King Richard took a thick iron bar and with a huge swing of his heavy broadsword cleaved the bar in two. Saladin, instead took a silk scarf and threw it in the air. As it fell, Saladin cut in neatly in half with a swift stroke of his razor sharp scimitar. The two, who had earlier scoffed at the apparently ineffective weaponry of their adversary, left with a new-found respect.

    Sorry, just thought the analogy was too similar.

    Cheers,

    Dom
    They are similar Dom. Both stories illustrate the concept of "different strokes for different folks."

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,216
    Difficult wood....about as close as I get...
    Fancy grain Ash 2.JPGFancy graine Ash 3.JPG

    Have a 1 x 6 of Ash, IF anyone wants to try it out.....while I am on the "DL" for a while...( trying to figure a project to use it in..)

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Speaking of "how well would a planer handle a board like this?"

    How about this one:

    Attachment 420977

    That piece was approx. 4"X10-1/4"X7'. It was rough and uneven all around. It took awhile with hand planes but it looks good now.

    jtk
    LOL! Good point. But, while not a lunch box, my planer would handle it. The plank would probably be a bit smaller that if hand planed, however.

    3CCAB1B6-959D-4A8A-884B-4B9ABCCFA22C.jpg

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •