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Thread: Creeker's Past Week's Accomplishments

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Conway, Arkansas
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    Creeker's Past Week's Accomplishments

    18 Nov 2019

    Greetings,
    Been a very busy week with the dining table project in full swing and getting Christmas orders done....but.....I still had time to get this put together and tested.
    76661756_152614562761285_6766371398869843968_n.jpg

    I still have some minor setup work to do on it, but for the most part, it's all setup.
    The dining table project is still moving along. 2 of the White Oak boards weigh in a 110.5 pounds each so I'm still guessing that the table top will weigh around 400 pounds when completed. I'm ready for this project to be done and over with.

    Gotta get some rest, so that's it for me for now.....so what did YOU do this past week?

    Best of weeks to you all.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Dennis, I'm truly happy for you that you finally got that nice new machine into your arsenal....you're going to eat that up and have a great time!

    This past week included some design time for some custom monograms for a client order for two valet type boxes. She wanted them to be three initials with the "last initial" in the middle. Sadly, that resulted in an unfortunate letter order for one of them and after a bunch of intermediate ideas, I came up with a two-letter monogram for that particular box that worked out fine. The other one remains three letters and looks "nice", but it's not as visually "nice" to me as another slightly modified version I came up with prior. But she's the customer so I gotta go with what I gotta go with. She originally wanted them in bocote, but the board foot price of that is sky high and my local suppliers didn't have any wide enough for the work, so we settled on shedua which was about half the board foot price but still dad the nice, rich, darker color she wanted. Community members who remember Mark Singer (RIP) might recollect that shedua was one of his favorite species to work with and I'm looking forward to the end result. In other activities, I got my new-to-me drum sander all situated and "fully tested", prepared a couple of VG D-Fir topped guitar bodies for finishing, cut a couple of holiday ornaments for orders that came into my ETSY shop and did a bunch of work on my guitar build number 3, including fretting, gluing on the neck and grain filling with Z-Poxy...it is now ready for clear coating.

    IMG_E6082.jpg IMG_E6083.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
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    308
    Dennis - I hope you love your new shop "toy".
    Jim - Guitar is looking good. Will you please post pics when it is complete.

    As for my weekend, Saturday was spent helping sort 60 years accumulation in my mother-in-law's house. She has been in her senior living apartment just a bit over a year and is finally ready to let her house go. Sunday I got to spent a bit of time in my shop, though I was just building "quick and dirty" drawers for a cabinet in DH's workshop. I also made the drawer I needed to complete a new bandsaw stand I made a month or two ago. That's it for me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
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    9,565
    Hi, I put up Christmas lights before the snow gets deep, Diann was concerned that something was wrong as I'm normally wading through the stuff putting up lights :-)

    We also put up all the miniature houses on the plate rail in the dining room, starting to look like Christmas.........Rod.

  5. #5
    Dennis, have fun with the CNC! Jim, guitar looks marvelous!

    I finished milling all the stock for my mantel project and finished all the joinery for the rails and stiles of the columns. The multi-roller stands I bought were a tremendous help with the long stock at the bandsaw, jointer and planer. Next up are the panels for the columns. They are milled to thickness, but I left them quite a bit oversize in width and length so I could optimize figure selection. Once they are cut to size I'll need to rabbet the edges and then pre-finish them before assembly. Plan to use shellac. I've mostly used Seal-coat in the past, but I ordered some different shade flakes to experiment with this time. Garnet seem to be a favorite of many folks on Cherry, so will give that try on some drops. Once the columns are done and installed, the rest of the mantel will be more or less built in place a layer at a time; more like a built-in than a cabinet really.

    The decision to go with shellac led to another project, namely getting some heat in the garage so I can do the finishing out there. I don't like to work with flammable stuff in the basement. My garage is attached and well insulated, so I picked up a 7500 watt electric garage heater which should keep it plenty warm enough when I need it. Need to run a 240 line to garage for it, but have been wanting to do that for a while anyway for welding, and it's a pretty short run to a nearby sub-panel.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Alabama
    Posts
    383
    Saturday morning I tried a couple of new-to-me recipes for game time snacking. While some pork belly burnt ends were on the smoker, I made up some jalapeno poppers (ABTs). We've tried stuffed jalapenos a few times before, but the example I followed this time was the best we've made so far.

    I spent some time Sunday afternoon making more progress on the rustic bed frame I'm making for Christmas. Previously I had prefinished and attached pine planks to a torsion box shell for the headboard and footboard. This weekend I made progress cutting material to wrap the edges. I'm anxious to get it completed. It isn't an easy task to keep my focus on it and not the other half-dozen projects I'd like to tackle once it's done.
    Chuck Taylor

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Jim - Guitar is looking good. Will you please post pics when it is complete.
    Simply subscribe to the referenced thread and you'll not miss a single spec of sawdust with the project.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    USVI
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    80
    I always enjoy peeking in on this thread. With the hurricane season winding down
    weve started back up with the porch galleries around the house. We had 40 columns poured
    before I shut it down a few months ago. Hopefully well have the last 6 we need done by Wednesday and then start
    framing forms for the arches and ring beam sometime next week. A lot of work left
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    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
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    USVI
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    80
    Sorry bout that upside down stuff and th weird spacing. Im a little tech challenged haha

  10. #10
    I finished up a bed for me. It is based upon the Woodsmith Classic Cherry design. I finished it with Osmo poly oil - my first use of this product. I was surprised by this product in a good way. It was $50 for .75l which seems really expensive but you use so little I think it works out to be pretty reasonable. It is pretty easy to apply and I think the result looks good. It took me roughly a month to build the bed, along with other things that needed done.

    I then did a little two day project. My front door had a mortise lock that my ex still had a key to. I put another device on the door so that did her no good but I needed to remove the old mortise lock, fill the hole, and install new locks. I put in a piece of oak salvaged from old stair treads that was over 4 inches wide, over 5 inches tall and 15/16 inch thick. It is glued in place by construction adhesive. Removing the old lock and getting that in took my available time the first day. Second day was installing lock sets and doing a little priming of the raw wood. I also used bondo for filling in areas not plugged with oak. Then I had to drill two 2 1/8 holes for the deadbolt and lockset plus the inch hole in the edge of the door for both. In the process I learned that my old Ryobi cordless drills are stouter than my newer m12 Milwaukee drill. I was surprised by that. The Milwaukee wouldn't drill the 1 inch hole or the 2 1/8 hole. It kept turning itself (on overload I presume). I had a 4 amp hour battery in it. The Ryobi also has a 4 amp hour battery and didn't complain a bit. I was surprised. Finish painting waited a couple days but is done now.

    I am trying to help a doggie heal up and trying to get motivated to scale up the plans for the end tables to match the bed. I don't know why Woodsmith thinks everybody is so short. On a bed, it is pretty easy to just move the bedrail where it needs to be but its harder to raise the end tables without messing up the proportions (I also made the headboard and footboard 2 inches taller than the plans said and changed the way the flat spindles went in). I like Woodsmith plans but I also always seem to do something a little different. Makes it fun but it means I can't just print out the plans and start making sawdust.

  11. #11
    Thursday was my busy day. On Wednesday night, boiled eggs for deviled eggs,and cut up green peppers, onions and celery for dressing for monthly dinner at local senior center. From State Fair Ministry, last month, I left gas stove on back porch to use for this one day. This allowed me to have two full sized ovens to use. Because it was below 40 degrees, I was able to prepare turkey and place in oven on Wednesday night. Got up at 3:00 AM, and started turkey. While I was waiting for it to stabilize, I made a pineapple / cherry dump cake. Slept in recliner from 4:30 till seven, then got up and made two steam trays of dressing for turkey, plus ice tea and deviled eggs. Made a lot of seniors happy with turkey and dressing for lunch. Made a sweet potato casserole and apple dumplings to take to #2 grandsons, along with some turkey and dressing. Saturday night, made a pot of potato soup. Had son and DIL, along with oldest grand daughter over for corned beef and cabbage last night. As you can tell, food was a big part of my week

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,667
    Been quite a while since I've checked in on this thread. Since I retired early this summer, I've been spending quite a bit of time in the shop. This last week, I put the final touches on the standards for a timber-frame inspired wood rack that I started, like, 2 years ago. I also started rough dimensioning the cross ties which will have a scarf joint. I've been using this project to stretch myself.

    In my spare time, I'm sanding about 1100 building blocks I cut from scrap piled around the workshop. Our woodworking group provides the building blocks to the local Head Start program to distribute to young children. Nice way to clean up the shop!

    I've also been kicking around what to get myself as a retirement gift. Was thinking about a new truck for quite a while but I really don't like anything I've looked at. So, I decided to keep my truck for another year and bought myself a new toy for the shop - a Nova Voyager drill press to upgrade from my benchtop press. Will be in in 7-10 days. Can't wait!
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,658
    As posted recently, I have begun a hall table for a niece. This has been interrupted by installing a new workshop door.

    In place of the old solid door, the new door provides some desperately needed extra light by having a glass panel in the upper half ...



    What is great is that there is a built in blind to privacy. This lies in a double-paned section, which enables both sound/heat insulation, as well as a dust-free action.



    The old door was the bearer of a pin board. This now resides lower down ...



    ... where you can see the current project ..



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    50,199
    That door is a very nice addition to your shop, Derek, and yea, the internal blinds are the prefect solution for "our" somewhat dusty environments!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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