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Thread: Picking a "new" 7 after some misfortune...

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,256
    Bram,

    I would not try to sand out the scratches as a first step. The cast is rather soft, and I would use a smoothing file as a first step, probably an 8 inch or 6 inch. I would lay the file dead flat on the plane and file over the scratches first. The file will take off the high part of the scratches that are proud of the surface of the sole of the plane extremely rapidly. That step will be very easy and very quick. Drastically less time than your float glass and sand paper. I would say it could be done in a couple of minutes or so. Be sure to use a light touch, as a new sharp file should cut high spots along the edges of the scratches on the old cast iron sole in literally a few swipes. The file will likely leave some scratches of it's own, but they will be very shallow. The next steps, below will take care of remaining burrs, sharp edges of the deep scratches and some of the tiny scratches from the file.

    Once you have the high raised edges of the scratches gone then I would use your float glass and sandpaper. I would use moderately fine sandpaper first, probably 220, followed by 320. You should not have to us the sand paper very long, maybe a few minutes at the very most with each grit, the idea being to use the file to quickly remove the edges along the scratches that the tip of the screw made.

    I certainly would not to work the sole down until the scratches were gone, there is no need and no advantage to such. All you really need to do is get the sole to the point that the edge of the scratches are back down level with the rest of the sole. I might then rub it down with some of the red/brown Scotch Brite pad to remove the sharp edges and any burrs that remain. You just need to get it to the point that it won't catch any wood fibers or scratch the wood you are planing. The Scotch Brite pad is to round over the sharp edges of the scratches once you have removed the edges that protrude above the surface of the metal with the file and fine sandpaper. Thus getting the scratches flat with the surface again.

    You had that plane working very well before the scratches happened. It will take very little to take care of the scratches and to get it back to the point that it again works very well.

    That said, if you decide to buy one of the other planes, like Jim, I would by the second plane in a heartbeat. It is an older stanley, and they were better, and much more carefully, made than the newer Stanley planes like the first one shown. That said, check the older Stanley out well before you buy it. Make sure it has a flat sole, etc.

    Regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 11-17-2019 at 11:11 PM.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Berlin/Germany
    Posts
    49
    That's a great question. This seller doesn't really know much about hand tools. He just travels to the UK often and brings back tools.

    Yesterday he was selling a roll of augur bits, but 80-90% of them had completely (!!) removed spurs. I don't think he knew that made them useless.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Berlin/Germany
    Posts
    49
    Thank you for all the replies. I softly removed the burs on the scratches and yesterday I re-ground the iron to remove the nicks. Today I will sharpen the iron again and give it a spin!

    And as suggested my friend pays for beers. To be totally fair, when he started planing the board I stood next to him, so I too should have used my brain and told him to check the depth of the screws on the back. So... Lessons were learned the hard way, no friendships were lost

    Bram

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    911
    People do that to use them in an electric drill. Shame as they do make electric drill bits!
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Berlin/Germany
    Posts
    49
    Oh no! What a violation!!

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    20,067
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by William Fretwell View Post
    People do that to use them in an electric drill. Shame as they do make electric drill bits!
    An auger bit in an electric drill will often result in the work piece spinning around and whacking the user.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #22
    Hmmmm.....you may find that the plane tends to pull to the left, due to less friction. So you may want to run over that screw a few times on the right side also. Kidding of course....

    Richard

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,256
    Jim,

    A cut off auger bit in an an electric drill can definitely cause a work piece spin around....pretty sure I've been there done that. With a heavy duty drill I have also have had them catch, and if the lumber is large enough or clamped down, had the drill try to do a number on my wrists while hanging on to the drill. You can't stop it or let go of it quickly enough before the drill twists in your hands....sometimes to your regret.

    Regards,

    Stew

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,750
    Quote Originally Posted by Stew Denton View Post
    Jim,

    A cut off auger bit in an an electric drill can definitely cause a work piece spin around....pretty sure I've been there done that. With a heavy duty drill I have also have had them catch, and if the lumber is large enough or clamped down, had the drill try to do a number on my wrists while hanging on to the drill. You can't stop it or let go of it quickly enough before the drill twists in your hands....sometimes to your regret.

    Regards,

    Stew
    SO TRUE! But the ends aren't being cut off for bench top woodworking. It's happening on the construction side: Post and beam and decks. Drilling long holes for 1" dowels or 1/2" bolts. And you are so right Stew, if the bit catches, the powerful 1/2" drill you're using will just keep turning and take your wrist and arm with it. When it happened to me, the drill was locked on and only stopped when the cord unplugged itself after winding around my arm and the drill about 5 times. Had a sore wrist for days.

    Ahh, memories.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,256
    Dave, my experience too, doing carpentry, not woodworking. That is also when I have had the experiences Jim talked about, pieces catching and spinning around, so I have had exactly the same experiences he has had....with the same unfortunate results to often also.

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 11-19-2019 at 12:58 AM.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,065
    Hmmm, that explains these...
    Drill bit box of bits, keepers.JPG
    Didn't even check for the spurs......


    back on topic....Happen to have a Stanley No. 7c, Type 9..and...an Ohio Tool Co. No. 0-7. the 0-7 had deep pits in the sole....sanded the sole smooth. Pits now hold any wax I apply to the sole, as the sole warms up, some of that wax will ooze out....Warning, warning...if you wax the sole on these big jointers, you better hold on tight, as they will fly along FAST.

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