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Thread: a question for chemists indoor lamp oil and Finishing oil

  1. #1

    a question for chemists indoor lamp oil and Finishing oil

    I am a retired pharmacist and live in the United kingdom

    Chestnut products market a Finishing oil ($27 per litre) see msd below

    https://chestnutproducts.co.uk/wp-co...ishing-Oil.pdft

    another Uk .company Barrettine market an indoor lamp oil ($5 per litre)

    see msd. below

    https://www.barrettinepro.co.uk/uplo...Lamp%20Oil.pdf

    My question from a practical point of view could the indoor lamp oil be used as a substitute for the Chestnut finishing oil

  2. #2
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    I would probably say no. The MSDS for the lamp oil indicates it is all normal alkanes (i.e. straight carbon chains of single bonds). Drying oils have some ability to chemically crosslink, and so the lamp oil probably would not dry (cure).

    You could always take a piece of wood and try it, but my guess on the limited info in the msds is that it would not work. That being said, its not completely clear what the Chestnut finishing oil is really made of.

    John

  3. #3
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    That being said, its not completely clear what the Chestnut finishing oil is really made of.
    Certainly not chestnuts, the Chestnut seems to be a brand name. The MSDS indicates a few drying or volatile agents, naphtha, xylene and a couple of others.

    The lamp oil looks to be noting but a flammable oil. It is not likely to dry anytime within our lifetimes.

    Boiled linseed oil, tung oil, or shellac may be better choices.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Deakin View Post
    I am a retired pharmacist and live in the United kingdom

    Chestnut products market a Finishing oil ($27 per litre) see msd below

    https://chestnutproducts.co.uk/wp-co...ishing-Oil.pdft

    another Uk .company Barrettine market an indoor lamp oil ($5 per litre)

    see msd. below

    https://www.barrettinepro.co.uk/uplo...Lamp%20Oil.pdf

    My question from a practical point of view could the indoor lamp oil be used as a substitute for the Chestnut finishing oil
    I don't believe I would use the lamp oil. Any I've seen was primarily kerosene. The MSDS on both products is not very clear what they are though. A finishing oil in normally a hardening oil such as linseed oil or tung oil.

  5. #5
    A huge thankyou to everyone for your posts/advice and educating me in the science of finishing oils

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Deakin View Post
    A huge thankyou to everyone for your posts/advice and educating me in the science of finishing oils
    One test is to put a drop of a candidate finish on a piece of glass and see if it sets up and forms a hard compound.

  7. #7
    John Thankyou for the advice

    I have purchased a can of Chestnut Finishing oil and plan to use it on future projects

  8. #8
    You might try Pentrol, which is about 70% naphtha, 1% ethylbenzene, and 30% not-mentioned-in-the-MSDS but pretty sure from the smell, linseed oil.

    I clear-coated a boat with it, I can attest, it will dry hard

    before-
    bf1.jpg

    after- (I didn't paint the tower to show the difference)
    af1.jpg af3.jpg

    --it was just an experiment that worked wonderfully...
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    You might try Pentrol, which is about 70% naphtha, 1% ethylbenzene, and 30% not-mentioned-in-the-MSDS but pretty sure from the smell, linseed oil.

    I clear-coated a boat with it, I can attest, it will dry hard

    before-
    bf1.jpg

    after- (I didn't paint the tower to show the difference)
    af1.jpg af3.jpg

    --it was just an experiment that worked wonderfully...

    Well, that just means that 70% of your money is going to evaporate (the naptha and ethyl benzene solvents). BLO is pretty cheap in comparison. You get more than 30% finish that way. (No solvents at all in good quality BLO!)
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  10. #10
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    I'm not a chemist - but - I do have an answer for you.

    You are looking for answers using the wrong documentation.

    A (Material) Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is not a formula sheet or even a complete listing of all the contents.

    It only lists the materials that are known to be harmful in the event of a spill while being transported.

    So - - the answer to your question is - no. The two are not interchangeable.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  11. #11
    Rich
    Thank you for educating me

    kind regards

    Brian

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by James Waldron View Post
    Well, that just means that 70% of your money is going to evaporate (the naptha and ethyl benzene solvents). BLO is pretty cheap in comparison. You get more than 30% finish that way. (No solvents at all in good quality BLO!)
    I did the whole boat with 3 cups of an $8 quart of the stuff, don't really think money was the issue. And for all I know, maybe the solvents are responsible for how well it turned out?
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    I did the whole boat with 3 cups of an $8 quart of the stuff, don't really think money was the issue. And for all I know, maybe the solvents are responsible for how well it turned out?

    Well, you're the expert, I suppose. Empericism rules! Chemistry is sooo Twentieth Century!
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

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