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Thread: Sealing door to shop

  1. #1

    Sealing door to shop

    I'm in the process of finishing half of my pole barn to be a shop. I've insulated the walls to R-19 and the cielings to R-38 and will have an 18k btu minisplit on it. Now I'm trying to decide how to seal the door. The door is inside the barn. You walk into the unwarmed (storage) side of the barn and then go through the door into the shop. I don't like the idea of a threshold as I think that is a tripping hazard. I have a large (42") exterior door that I plan to hang there. I just need to decide how to seal the bottom.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Huntington, Vermont
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    You can use an automatic door sweep. Here are some pictures https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C...h=1043&dpr=0.9. I think the ones I have used in the past are Pemco.

  3. #3
    but you agree that having a threshold on the floor is not the best idea?

  4. #4
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    Not having one would make rolling carts in and out easier. I think the ADA calls for thresholds no more than 1/2" high for minimal tripping hazard. A threshold allows for a fixed sweep doorseal.

  5. #5
    The automatic sweeps work pretty well. Another option would be a conventional threshold with ramps on both sides to eliminate any tripping hazard and make it easy to roll stuff through. 1/4 plywood with tapered sleepers is all you would need. Threshold isn't very tall so ramps could be fairly short.

    What's the floor? Can you recess a threshold? You wouldn't want to do it if it gets wet, but indoors would be fine.

  6. #6
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    No threshold makes it a bit easier for little critters like rodents to pass under the door, but I can appreciate the value of not having one to roll over. Normal door thresholds are not very high and you can adapt like Paul mentions if need be, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Not having one would make rolling carts in and out easier. I think the ADA calls for thresholds no more than 1/2" high for minimal tripping hazard. A threshold allows for a fixed sweep doorseal.
    1/2" total is correct, with no more than 1/4" of that vertical, and the other 1/4" can't be steeper than 45.
    Jason

    "Don't get stuck on stupid." --Lt. Gen. Russel Honore


  8. #8
    So sounds like you guys are saying just use a low profile threshold and a fixes sweep?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    The automatic sweeps work pretty well. Another option would be a conventional threshold with ramps on both sides to eliminate any tripping hazard and make it easy to roll stuff through. 1/4 plywood with tapered sleepers is all you would need. Threshold isn't very tall so ramps could be fairly short.

    What's the floor? Can you recess a threshold? You wouldn't want to do it if it gets wet, but indoors would be fine.
    It's a concrete floor. I was looking at low profile (1/2" max) thresholds at Lowes yesterday.

  10. #10
    So I just watched a video for those automatics door bottoms. They seem very cool and would be perfect. No need for a threshold but still get a nice seal at the bottom of the door. The only issue is not wanting to sit he jambs directly on the concrete. I guess PVC jamb is the ticket? Would have to use a palm router to route out the hinges I guess. You guys think that would be a good approach?

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    You could put a short section of PVC on the bottom of the jam to block moisture from the floor while not losing the structural benefit of the wood jam. PVC isn't exactly strong nor will it hold fasteners under stress. It also moves a lot seasonally and in all directions rather than with wood that is mostly across grain. I've often used PVC in this manner including on the bottom of the "bottom boards" for Professor Dr. SWMBO's honeybee hives which are out in the weather.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Or seal the bottom of the jamb with epoxy, I've used that method to prevent fitting of the bottom of garden furniture legs.

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