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Thread: Infuse Titebond II into crack bowl blanks with vacuum bag

  1. #1

    Infuse Titebond II into crack bowl blanks with vacuum bag

    I used the Magic bags Walmart sells with my 3 horsepower Shop Vac.

    I made a glue puddle next to the crack to act as a feeder as glue got sucked into the crack when I pulled the air out of the bag.

    So far it looks good for Chinese elm, Evergreen pear and Claro walnut. I will know more as I turn the wood away.

    Anyone else have success or tips for salvaging cracked turning blanks by infusing glue with vacuum bags?

    Thank you, Leland
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  2. #2
    I haven't heard of this method, at least not that I can remember... I have heard of soaking cracked bowls in a mix of half water and half wood glue to cure cracks. The idea is that water/glue penetrates all the way through any cracks, and as the wood swells due to absorbing water, the crack vanishes, and the blue joint is pretty much invisible. Interested in seeing how this works for you.

    robo hippy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,466
    Quote Originally Posted by Leland Frayseth View Post
    I used the Magic bags Walmart sells with my 3 horsepower Shop Vac.

    I made a glue puddle next to the crack to act as a feeder as glue got sucked into the crack when I pulled the air out of the bag.

    So far it looks good for Chinese elm, Evergreen pear and Claro walnut. I will know more as I turn the wood away.

    Anyone else have success or tips for salvaging cracked turning blanks by infusing glue with vacuum bags?

    Thank you, Leland
    IMG_0344.jpgIMG_0349.jpgIMG_0347.jpg
    I have many times infused not wood glue but epoxy into tiny cracks under vaccuum and it worked well. This for metallographic tests on thin uranium-bearing plates I cut from nuclear reactor elements. I let the epoxy set up while under vaccuum. I used a vacuum bell chamber and a vacuum pump rather than bags but I can't imagine that making a huge difference as long as you have enough vaccuum.

    JKJ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    735
    The Titebond will fill the cracks but without clamping pressure it will not hold the cracks together. Hopefully you take this into consideration when turning the cracked blanks.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Please see personal profile for website info.

  5. #5
    John Beaver, It was clamped 14.7 pounds per square inch outside the bag, vacuum inside the bag, excellent penetration at glue line due to vacuum. Titebond sells a thick gap filling glue mostly good reviews for strength some complaints from those who got a bottle beyond shelf life. I expect the glue to be stronger than the wood in tension and the glue's properties are isotropic (the same in all directions). Of course I will be careful turning dried blanks I always am. Leland

  6. #6
    Reed Gray and John Jordan, "Doesn't that frost your bowls?" I got good penetration on all cracks, some did not fill because I lost my feeder. What is most amazing I thought they were wet when I opened the bag but to my surprise the vacuum atomized the glue and left a glaze on the bowls. I had thought about wanting to try this with finishes but my favorite finish 1/3 BLO, 1/3 OBV, 1/3 non eco friendly paint thinner may off gas explosive vapors going through my Shop Vac sparking motor, I did not have a big enough set of bowls to try that yet, may buy a cheapo Harbor Freight venturi to try pulling a vacuum with finishes. Also to my pleasant surprise the Titebond II is drying clear in the cracks, must be the entrained air that makes it dry milky yellow, I dunno. This is very promising, some bowls do need a 2nd treatment and I may have to resort to some plastic straws filled with glue for feeders in some cases where gravity is fighting me before I pull the vacuum. Leland
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    1,303
    In my shop, a cracked blank becomes a smaller blank or firewood. Wood is incredibly easy to come by, and I refuse to sell a repaired crack product. My glass and ceramic artist friends don't sell repaired work, why should I? Not a popular opinion these days, but it's the one I've lived by for over 30 years of turning and it's served me well with a long successful part time business.

  8. #8
    Richard Coers the repaired bowls are not for sale they are from trees with immense sentimental value and will be cherished in their families for generations. No repair no savored memories of good times at Grandpa's home 😂

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Leland Frayseth View Post
    I used the Magic bags Walmart sells with my 3 horsepower Shop Vac.

    I made a glue puddle next to the crack to act as a feeder as glue got sucked into the crack when I pulled the air out of the bag.

    So far it looks good for Chinese elm, Evergreen pear and Claro walnut. I will know more as I turn the wood away.

    Anyone else have success or tips for salvaging cracked turning blanks by infusing glue with vacuum bags?

    Thank you, Leland
    IMG_0344.jpgIMG_0349.jpgIMG_0347.jpg
    You can also use your thumb to rub glue into cracked wood. It's surprising how fast you can get the glue coming out the other side of a board.

  10. #10
    I started milling into the Claro Walnut and Chinese Elm that I had infused with Titebond II in vacuum bags and I couldn't be happier with the results. I paid attention to the outside temperature and thought about how the glue was going to feed the crack after I closed up the bag and started pulling a vacuum. I wouldn't do this with everything some wood has to go into the recycle tote but to save this Claro Walnut at $45/bd-ft if you can get it and this is the same tree as I made music boxes for a special grandma and her grand children this is priceless. I'm looking forward to opening up the Chinese Elm right down the middle tomorrow on the bandsaw that should be revealing but I am pretty much expecting the same great crack penetration the Claro rounds experienced. 14.7 pounds per square inch here at sea level that is 2,117 pounds per square foot and with a bag you get some really great flexibility as oppose to a clamp that clamps between 2 points. I am going to try doing some vacuum bending in a bag, I saw some skate boards layered up that way and they came out drop dead gorgeous and had nice waves at the toe and heel of the board.
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