Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Turning a sliding table attachment into a "true slider"

  1. #1

    Turning a sliding table attachment into a "true slider"

    So I've got one of those sliding table attachments - not a large Excalibur style but the smaller cantilevered ones like sawstop has. Mine is a Craftex, the equivalent of Grizzly in Canada. I am also very adamant about good dust collection,and would like a setup where even the smallest operations have dust collected at the source.

    I also have an incra mitre gauge, and combined with the cast iron top of the saw, aluminum sliding table, the whole setup is very slippery.

    I've put the incra gauge at the "head" of the sliding table, and I must say... It feels a heck of a lot safer to operate because you start cutting standing next to the blade, as opposed to behind it. So I want to get closer to a "true" slider, where the table slides right next to the blade.

    My first thought is to put a runner on a sheet of plywood, as a kind of auxiliary table that would be attached to the sliding table. I could dado a miter slot in it to use with a Fritz and Franz style jig, and the whole thing could come off if I need to rip things longer than the range of the sliding table.

    I guess I'm wondering - has anyone tried/done/seen this before? If so, how did you like it? Or am I barking fully up the wrong tree? I've tried dust shrouds on crosscut sleds before, but they are cumbersome and clunky and I'm not a fan. I'd like a true small slider some day but I will have to earn the funds to buy it first!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,116
    Terrance I walked somewhat the same road as you are now on. I had an Excalibur on a Unisaw,then moved to a Minimax Sc2 slider (Older used machine).I think that what you want to try may work somewhat. Try it out you can always go back to what you have now. I will say that when I began using the Minimax it was a revelation.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,911
    While adaptations like you describe will never fully duplicate having a true slider, they can certainly enhance the way your work and provide some of the benefits, including getting your hands away from the blade. Ultimately, you may want to consider what Mike did...and I did..."move up" to a true slider, even if it's a short stroke unit due to space. The repeatable precision is wonderful and you can still rip conventionally when you need to.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    While adaptations like you describe will never fully duplicate having a true slider, they can certainly enhance the way your work and provide some of the benefits, including getting your hands away from the blade. Ultimately, you may want to consider what Mike did...and I did..."move up" to a true slider, even if it's a short stroke unit due to space. The repeatable precision is wonderful and you can still rip conventionally when you need to.
    Oh yeah, I plan to when I can afford to! But like I say, I gotta earn it first! Probably 5 years away. I was nearly sold when I saw a fellow forum users hammer b3... But that's a five figure saw and even the k3 is more saw than I could ever justify right now!

    I'll be sure to post a thread if/when I make the mods!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,616
    Quote Originally Posted by Terence Tourangeau View Post
    ....... My first thought is to put a runner on a sheet of plywood, as a kind of auxiliary table that would be attached to the sliding table. I could dado a miter slot in it to use with a Fritz and Franz style jig, and the whole thing could come off if I need to rip things longer than the range of the sliding table.

    I guess I'm wondering - has anyone tried/done/seen this before? If so, how did you like it? Or am I barking fully up the wrong tree? I've tried dust shrouds on crosscut sleds before, but they are cumbersome and clunky and I'm not a fan. I'd like a true small slider some day but I will have to earn the funds to buy it first!
    Hi Terence, prior to purchasing a Hammer K3 close to 3 years ago, my table saw set up for 20-odd years was very similar to yours. Here’s what I had ...



    As you have found, this is an excellent set up, especially for crosscuts. And, again as you appear to be heading, it was the foundation to appreciate the advantages of a full slider machine.

    I can see the possibilities in adding a longer sliding table. However, converting a saw like this to a slider is going to run into a couple of issues. Most obvious is the rail system to the front and rear of the table saw. It needs to be substantial to carry the extra weight, since up to now part of this is shared by the table saw’s tabletop. The second difference is that the blade still runs about 12” from the sliding table. On a true slider, it runs about 1/2” away. Will this significantly limit the effectiveness of a conversion? I don’t know, other than extra friction from a converted set up.



    Personally, I would not go to the trouble of a conversion. I view the two set ups as different concepts, and both work well. If you want a slider, then rather than build a replica, go and purchase one. I am very happy with my change over, and would not go back.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #6
    Terence
    I have the Grizzly sliding table on my table saw and I did what your talking about. I made a 4 ft runner to go in the left miter slot. I than put a 2 ft by 4 ft 1/2 inch plywood on the runner and let it hang over the blade about a half in. Than I squared it up with my rip fence and fastened it down. Than made the cut which made it zero clearance and made it positive to line up the cut to a line.
    I than got a Incra 27" by 49" expandable fence with the Incra double flip stop. Squared it up to be 90 degrees only. I took the left handle off of the original miter gauge a drilled a hole in the plywood and fasten it to the plywood which locked it down on the slider.
    The four ft runner keeps it from turning and also allows the plywood to go all the way out to the sliders limit in front.
    The one nice thing about this set up is what ever your cutting is on the plywood and sliding table and not dragging on the saw table.
    This is about as close to a real sliding table saw as you get without having a real one. With this setup you can square one end of a board and put it on the slider and rip a straight edge when there is none. Of course the end has to be wide enough to keep it from moving around. And on most boards you can get that are wide enough a better friction free cut.
    This setup comes off and on the saw with just loosening the handle and lifting it off'
    Nothing will in my opinion replace a real sliding table saw. Hope I did it half way understandable what I was trying to explain
    I did go back to the original miter gauge fence with some changes that made it better to use. But the plywood table on the slider works very good. Sorry for the long winded post. Hope this helps, Bob
    Last edited by Bob Potter; 11-08-2019 at 9:33 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Potter View Post
    Terence
    I have the Grizzly sliding table on my table saw and I did what your talking about. I made a 4 ft runner to go in the left miter slot. I than put a 2 ft by 4 ft 1/2 inch plywood on the runner and let it hang over the blade about a half in. Than I squared it up with my rip fence and fastened it down. Than made the cut which made it zero clearance and made it positive to line up the cut to a line.
    I than got a Incra 27" by 49" expandable fence with the Incra double flip stop. Squared it up to be 90 degrees only. I took the left handle off of the original miter gauge a drilled a hole in the plywood and fasten it to the plywood which locked it down on the slider.
    The four ft runner keeps it from turning and also allows the plywood to go all the way out to the sliders limit in front.
    The one nice thing about this set up is what ever your cutting is on the plywood and sliding table and not dragging on the saw table.
    This is about as close to a real sliding table saw as you get without having a real one. With this setup you can square one end of a board and put it on the slider and rip a straight edge when there is none. Of course the end has to be wide enough to keep it from moving around. And on most boards you can get that are wide enough a better friction free cut.
    This setup comes off and on the saw with just loosening the handle and lifting it off'
    Nothing will in my opinion replace a real sliding table saw. Hope I did it half way understandable what I was trying to explain
    I did go back to the original miter gauge fence with some changes that made it better to use. But the plywood table on the slider works very good. Sorry for the long winded post. Hope this helps, Bob
    Yep I just came in from the shop and that's more or less what I have drawn up! With one difference being I will rout a miter slot in mine and I think I will make the miter gauge reversible.

    I'm curious, what made you go back to the original miter gauge and what changes did you make?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by Terence Tourangeau View Post
    So I've got one of those sliding table attachments - not a large Excalibur style but the smaller cantilevered ones like sawstop has. Mine is a Craftex, the equivalent of Grizzly in Canada. I am also very adamant about good dust collection,and would like a setup where even the smallest operations have dust collected at the source.

    I also have an incra mitre gauge, and combined with the cast iron top of the saw, aluminum sliding table, the whole setup is very slippery.

    I've put the incra gauge at the "head" of the sliding table, and I must say... It feels a heck of a lot safer to operate because you start cutting standing next to the blade, as opposed to behind it. So I want to get closer to a "true" slider, where the table slides right next to the blade.

    My first thought is to put a runner on a sheet of plywood, as a kind of auxiliary table that would be attached to the sliding table. I could dado a miter slot in it to use with a Fritz and Franz style jig, and the whole thing could come off if I need to rip things longer than the range of the sliding table.

    I guess I'm wondering - has anyone tried/done/seen this before? If so, how did you like it? Or am I barking fully up the wrong tree? I've tried dust shrouds on crosscut sleds before, but they are cumbersome and clunky and I'm not a fan. I'd like a true small slider some day but I will have to earn the funds to buy it first!
    Hi Terence,
    I like it!
    I have basically the same slider attachment on my table saw. I have the Incra miter sled mounted so that it is attached to the slider, but the miter bar rides in the table saw miter slot. The other half of the Incra miter sled (the fixed portion) is normally installed to the right of the blade with its miter bar fitting into the right side miter slot. I also have a very small Fritz & Franz jig which can be attached to the Incra sled. I have another jig for longer rips. As you mentioned, this is basically runners mounted to a piece of plywood. It can come off for longer rips (or actually the red miter bar can be removed and the work piece repositioned for much longer rips still using the slider). The fence on the rip sled can also be positioned at angles for tapered cuts. I modified a Saw Stop blade guard to fit my saw and the dust collection is excellent.
    David

    Grizzly 1023rlwx.jpg 20190409_225855.jpg20190409_225903.jpg20190409_225910.jpg20190409_225939.jpg20190409_230010.jpgRipping Fixture bottom view.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by David Buchhauser; 11-09-2019 at 1:32 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    440
    Incra miter sled with right half installed. Table saw dust collection.

    Incra miter sled.jpgtable saw dust collection.jpg

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Incra miter sled with right half installed. Table saw dust collection.

    Incra miter sled.jpgtable saw dust collection.jpg
    Thanks for all of the photos, looks great! Do you actually cut stuff with what you're showing in the first image?

    I have the same dust collection shroud - it does seem to do a decent job but it's also very finnicky.

    LAst question, what is that shoe that you have your toggle clamp attached to? I feel like I would find that useful, I think we have the same slider attachment. Did you ever find a source for track/metal that fits snugly in the oversize slots?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by Terence Tourangeau View Post
    Thanks for all of the photos, looks great! Do you actually cut stuff with what you're showing in the first image? Yes.

    I have the same dust collection shroud - it does seem to do a decent job but it's also very finnicky. Mine works great. I don't find it the least bit "finnicky".

    LAst question, what is that shoe that you have your toggle clamp attached to? I feel like I would find that useful, I think we have the same slider attachment. Did you ever find a source for track/metal that fits snugly in the oversize slots?
    The "shoe" is shop made. I machined the runners to for a good fit into the slider slots. The miter bar on the Incra is adjustable for a snug fit into the table saw miter slots.

  12. #12
    David I sure like what you did , good job.
    Bob

  13. #13
    I went back to the original to be able to cut large miters and also to be able to use rip fence and in most cases without removing the miter fence from the sliding table. But I still use the plywood table on the slider from time to time.
    Bob

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Potter View Post
    David I sure like what you did , good job.
    Bob
    Thanks Bob!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •