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Thread: Water pressure in a house - 90 PSI too high?

  1. #1
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    Water pressure in a house - 90 PSI too high?

    Typical water pressure from my city is 90 psi. Few houses I have seen have water pressure regluators to lower it. How important is it to get it down to the oft recommended range of 60 to 70 psi? Given the restrictors built-in to modern faucets and shower heads, is 60 to 70 psi actually too low?

    (I suppose that the city lines could have spikes in pressure.)

  2. #2
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    That is way to high for in house pressure.
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

  3. #3
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    My first reaction is if 90 psi hasn't caused any problems, why fix it if it isn't broke? On the other hand if pressure spikes are a problem, then any higher than 90 psi is asking for problems. All it takes is one new fireman or water department employee to shut a hydrant or valve too fast to send a 30 psi surge down the line. If it were me, I would play it safe and install a good 3/4" adjustable pressure regulator set to 65 psi. Flow restrictors are another problem but you wouldn't notice much difference in flow between 65 and 90 psi. Before you make a final decision based on internet experts, call your local water department. https://www.amazon.com/Watts-0009257...s%2C243&sr=8-4
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 11-05-2019 at 8:24 PM.
    NOW you tell me...

  4. #4
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    We had pressure that high in a prior house and ran through faucet washers and o-rings like crazy. A pressure regulator was a cheap and easy fix.

  5. #5
    I believe I would put a regulator on your water. If something burst at that pressure someone could get hurt. Then a frequent flooding issue to a house is the lines to a washing machine. At 90 psi the house could flood quickly if the line burst. Almost nobody shuts the water off to the washer when done. Myself, I don't trust pex plumbing and most new homes are done with it. I for sure wouldn't want pex and 90 psi.

  6. #6
    That sounds too high for sure. I would install a regulator to get it down.

  7. #7
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    Get up and check the static pressure at 3:00 AM. I would expect it to be 20-30 PSI higher. Mine is around 60Psi in daylight and over 80 PSi after dark when people stop watering their gardens.
    Bill D.

  8. #8
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    I've heard it's an issue for water heaters too.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Danstrom View Post
    I've heard it's an issue for water heaters too.
    High pressure is certainly a problem for automatic livestock watering tanks - it can cause the valves to leak. I have one out in my horse pasture. Different valves are available for different pressure ranges but still I have to check it often.

    JKJ

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    High pressure is certainly a problem for automatic livestock watering tanks - it can cause the valves to leak. I have one out in my horse pasture. Different valves are available for different pressure ranges but still I have to check it often.

    JKJ

    At the lab the goat water troughs just used a regular toilet valve. But it was in a corner with a latched cover so the goats could not mess with it. The troughs were up on a stand so the plumbing could come in from the bottom. Probably had a guard over that as well.

  11. #11
    I had a pressure regulator fail, which I discovered because all the (expensive) shower faucet cartridges failed one after another. Yes, you definitely want to regulate it down.

  12. #12
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    At my old house it was 90 and I put on a regulator to drop it to 55. However, I ran a line before the regulator to the faucet I used for watering. Just an idea.

    My new house has a regulator and it is 65; I would like to turn it down, but regulators are flaky and turning it down could have bad consequences. It is behind a wall with a tiny access door, so I will have to rip the wall out to replace it. As such, I am living with 65. (probably should just bite the bullet and put in a big door...)

  13. #13
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    As a home inspector we are required by the state to mark as deficient static water pressure less than 40 psi and more than 80 psi. For most new construction the cities tell builders to set the pressure at 65 psi if it is over and a regulator is present. The excessive pressure causes issues mentioned in previous posts. As previously stated adding a pressure regulator on the supply line is the fix. The pressure regulator creates a closed system so an expansion tank is also needed if not present. It goes on the cold water line just before the water heater. They are about 50 dollars and installed with a T fitting.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Goodin View Post
    The pressure regulator creates a closed system so an expansion tank is also needed if not present. It goes on the cold water line just before the water heater.
    Do expansion tanks also have a valve with some sort of pressure setting? - or a pressure setting built into the design of the tank?

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John Goodin View Post
    As a home inspector we are required by the state to mark as deficient static water pressure less than 40 psi and more than 80 psi. For most new construction the cities tell builders to set the pressure at 65 psi if it is over and a regulator is present. The excessive pressure causes issues mentioned in previous posts. As previously stated adding a pressure regulator on the supply line is the fix. The pressure regulator creates a closed system so an expansion tank is also needed if not present. It goes on the cold water line just before the water heater. They are about 50 dollars and installed with a T fitting.
    John, can you explain the expansion tank further? I've owned a couple houses where there was a pressure regulator, but neither had an expansion tank...

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