Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 60 of 60

Thread: Why a 12" jointer?

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cache Valley, Utah
    Posts
    1,503
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie McDottie View Post
    I wonder how long before I'm thinking, "shoot, should have gotten a 16"?
    Thanks again.
    When I had my 8" jointer I frequently wished I had something bigger. Now that I have a 12" I'm pretty happy with the size and seldom, if ever, wish I had something bigger.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,152
    I was looking at a real good 12'' jointer used and the guy wanted $3500 for it,so I looked a little more and found a 16'' Italian made jointer for $2400. That took about a nano second to make that decision,however as rod pointed out since that decision I have added a bigger bandsaw and planer. I am done buying major tools/machines and starting to watch for wood and build way more stuff,seems like the building the shop phase is finally at an end and I am good with that.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,566
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    And the problem with that is what???

    Hmmm......................Let me think for a minute.........................Ummmmmmmm.......... ....I don't know

  4. #49
    For those wondering about wide lumber, here's Lou Irion's take.

    https://irionlumber.com/working-with...atched-lumber/

  5. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    For those wondering about wide lumber, here's Lou Irion's take.

    https://irionlumber.com/working-with...atched-lumber/
    If wood is going to cup over time (due to changing conditions), it's going to cup twice as much if it's twice as wide. Basic wood technology (see Hoadley e.g.) This puts more stress on the wood, (cracking it perhaps) that can be avoided for almost no esthetic cost by ripping and gluing. Irion's notion that a modern glued ripline joint is not as strong as the wood is hooey. Why he's promoting this point I can only guess.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    50,226
    Doug, while it's true that wood that wants to move is going to move, I agree with Irion with the exception of the glue joint strength point you bring up and there really is an aesthetic cost to ripping and re-gluing...it's very rare that those joints are not going to be visible unless one is working with vertical grain that is pretty darn parallel with the boards on both edges. I much prefer to work with wide lumber and actually seek that out as much as possible.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    185
    I saw that too on the glue joint, maybe he was just referring to the hide glue thats how it reads at first - a typo perhaps...

    "Furthermore, we saw more trouble with the pieces with glued up lumber, probably because the original hide type glues are not as powerful as modern adhesives"


    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    If wood is going to cup over time (due to changing conditions), it's going to cup twice as much if it's twice as wide. Basic wood technology (see Hoadley e.g.) This puts more stress on the wood, (cracking it perhaps) that can be avoided for almost no esthetic cost by ripping and gluing. Irion's notion that a modern glued ripline joint is not as strong as the wood is hooey. Why he's promoting this point I can only guess.

  8. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    I saw that too on the glue joint, maybe he was just referring to the hide glue thats how it reads at first - a typo perhaps...

    "Furthermore, we saw more trouble with the pieces with glued up lumber, probably because the original hide type glues are not as powerful as modern adhesives"
    As he's using it to justify wide boards for use nowadays, and not just talking about the past, I think it's more than a typo.

    Note that the "ancient" furniture we see today is the furniture that _survived_. :^) For the average piece going out the door, the "professional" back then likely had the same pressure to streamline his work that he does now.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,857
    I must confess that I didn't read all the previous posts on this rather simple question but I will tell you why I went from a 6 inch jointer to a 12 inch jointer. For decades, the 6 inch worked okay. After I got a CNC router, I began carving plaques, trivets, signs and other wooden items in some quantities for sale. This requires both flat and uniformly thick material. There are all kinds of time consuming and inaccurate work arounds, but the easiest and most accurate way to achieve that goal is to use a jointer and planer of the necessary width, followed by a drum sander pass or two to improve dimensional precision. My point is that if you don't need a wide jointer then don't buy one but if you do then nothing else will do.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    507
    I'm just curious . . .How much does a Felder 12" combo jointer/planer with helical heads cost and weigh? I guess I can find the weight online, but sure can't find a price. I purchased an 8" Jet helical head jointer and have owned a 13" Dewalt 735 planer (for years). Together they provide me with sufficient capability to do whatever I need done. If I do encounter a wider board that needs flattening, I have access to at least 2 hardwood suppliers that have equipment. For a nominal price they do what I need done a lot less expensively (given the rarity of this need) than investing in a Felder combo. When I bought my 8" jointer, the prices for the combos available were excessive for my use; not to mention the weight of the combos would have made it extremely difficult to get the machine into my basement shop. So, just curious on the economies these days, especially for a non-production shop.

  11. #56
    Go to the Felder US website and register to see the MSRP price, weight, and everything in term of dimension, features.

    If you look for a Hammer machine or a Felder machine that is not option-able such as base RL dust extractors, the price is directly on their US Felder shop web site (including the current discount), no need to register.

    You can call Felder in your area to see what are their current promotion for option-able machines

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    185
    last end of year approx pricing with Silent power head. you can get the weight of the web.
    Hammer A331 $4090
    Hammer A341 $5590
    Felder AD531 $6690
    Felder AD741 $9675
    Felder AD941 $10,500



    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    I'm just curious . . .How much does a Felder 12" combo jointer/planer with helical heads cost and weigh? I guess I can find the weight online, but sure can't find a price. I purchased an 8" Jet helical head jointer and have owned a 13" Dewalt 735 planer (for years). Together they provide me with sufficient capability to do whatever I need done. If I do encounter a wider board that needs flattening, I have access to at least 2 hardwood suppliers that have equipment. For a nominal price they do what I need done a lot less expensively (given the rarity of this need) than investing in a Felder combo. When I bought my 8" jointer, the prices for the combos available were excessive for my use; not to mention the weight of the combos would have made it extremely difficult to get the machine into my basement shop. So, just curious on the economies these days, especially for a non-production shop.

  13. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    last end of year approx pricing with Silent power head. you can get the weight of the web.
    Hammer A331 $4090
    Hammer A341 $5590
    Felder AD531 $6690
    Felder AD741 $9675
    Felder AD941 $10,500
    Looks like the same price as end of the year for 2019

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,857
    There are other substantially cheaper alternatives to Hammer or Felder. I own a Jet JP12-HH that works well for me. I had issues to start with but they have been worked out.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    185
    You are correct, cheaper for sure...


    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mann View Post
    There are other substantially cheaper alternatives to Hammer or Felder. I own a Jet JP12-HH that works well for me. I had issues to start with but they have been worked out.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •