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Thread: taking a picture of a blue herron and a business card logo and creating a large meta

  1. #1

    taking a picture of a blue herron and a business card logo and creating a large meta

    tracing out full sized paper diagrams to create digitized files( *.dxf files )for a CO2 laser
    and a final plasma cut out of steel about 36 in x 72 inches



    https://youtu.be/qlIhV5PXEt8
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Hi Stan,
    How did you convert your photograph of the bird to the paper pattern drawing that you used to trace onto the digitizing board?
    David

  3. #3
    it was a bmp or jpg picture in a coloring book or possible intarsia project
    and ten got a print out

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    Quote Originally Posted by stan kern View Post
    it was a bmp or jpg picture in a coloring book or possible intarsia project
    and ten got a print out
    Did you take a picture of the page in the coloring book and have it printed to a larger size? If so where did you take it to have it printed to the larger size?
    Or is the page you are tracing in your video the actual page from the coloring book?
    I might have misunderstood your process. I thought you had taken a photo of an existing sign.
    David

  5. #5
    The lady that had the sign done gave me a picture of a heron she wanted from her business card,I took it to print shop and asked for a large print of the heron and the top wording that was written, this was done in oct
    I have a large collection of pdf coloring books and i collect pictures of various things that i can
    demo drawing to digitize
    Its not hard to find good pictures

  6. #6
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    OK. I think I understand. You had a jpg image of the heron and the print shop printed the heron onto paper and you used this to lay over your digitizing board to trace it.
    I have a program intended to run cnc laser machines called "LightBurn". You might be familiar with it. I have used it many times to import an image (jpg or bmp) and it will automatically trace it and then you can export it as a dxf file ready to cut. In fact - I have found that it works much better than Aspire for this purpose. I think I paid $40 for it. In fact - I was the one who suggested to the LightBurn staff that they add the "export as dxf" feature. I was using the trial version and told them that if they added that feature - I would buy it. They did add the feature and I did buy it - I think it was last year sometime. You might give it a try. It could probably save you lots of time compared to the tedious task of tracing the entire large image by hand onto your tracing board.
    David

  7. #7
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    Once you have a dxf digital file you can make the cut file any size you need. Resizing digital projects can be accomplished in every vector graphics program I have ever seen. The digital tracing task simply creates vector lines that can be resized from micro-miniature to the size of an aircraft carrier. If you start with a very small paper graphic and trace it you can easily increase the size in your software and then make a larger paper plan with a CNC Router, vinyl cutter or have it printed by a local shop.

    The LightBurn software that David mentioned above and a host of other programs have a trace function. The outcome is about the same as using Stan's Logic Trace software but the process is much different, sometimes more difficult then using a tracing tablet.

  8. #8
    I use lightburn software but for my laser, never used it for anything else

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    Once you have a dxf digital file you can make the cut file any size you need. Resizing digital projects can be accomplished in every vector graphics program I have ever seen. The digital tracing task simply creates vector lines that can be resized from micro-miniature to the size of an aircraft carrier. If you start with a very small paper graphic and trace it you can easily increase the size in your software and then make a larger paper plan with a CNC Router, vinyl cutter or have it printed by a local shop.

    The LightBurn software that David mentioned above and a host of other programs have a trace function. The outcome is about the same as using Stan's Logic Trace software but the process is much different, sometimes more difficult then using a tracing tablet.
    Hi Keith,
    I initially misunderstood Stan's process (my fault). I was originally thinking that he had taken a photo of the sign with the heron and was just wondering what his method was to convert it to the large paper pattern that he was using for tracing onto his digitizing board. Now I think that I understand that he already had the jpeg image and took it to a print shop to have the large paper pattern produced. I also own and use the GTCO Calcomp digitizing boards with the Logic Trace software. I think my largest board is 44" x 60" in size, my smallest is 12" x 18", and I have one in the middle that is probably around 30" x 36".

    If I already have a jpeg or bmp image to work with, then I generally try the "vector graphics program" first - my current favorite and the one that I have had the most success with is LightBurn. My second and third choices would be Aspire and PlasmaCAM Design Edge. Many times I get a clean vector file with no editing required. Other times the results do require some editing, and yet other times the resulting vector file is so bad that it's not worth the effort.

    The digitizing boards are great to use when no jpeg/bmp file is available. I also like them because you can actually put a flat metal part (or cardboard, plastic, etc.) right onto the board and trace it to get the preliminary dxf file. But, as I'm sure Stan can attest to, there is usually a fair amount of node editing to do to get the dxf file (produced by the Logic Trace program) into a "clean vector format" ready for cutting. I like VCarve or Aspire for this.

    So I was simply suggesting that for some of Stan's projects - it might be worthwhile to take a look at using one of the "vector graphics programs" with the auto trace feature as a potentially faster/less time consuming way to achieve the same end result.

    David

  10. #10
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    I don't have any experience with Stan's equipment but I have used small digitizing tablets in the distant past. I have no doubt that the hardware and software has improved considerably over the years. Secondly I am far from an expert with any of the vector conversion programs even though I have been using Corel Draw and Aspire for many years. The node editing task after the trace feature to me has always been difficult and time consuming so I have never been a fan of the process. Vectric has announced recently that the node editing in Aspire v10 has been improved but I have not had the opportunity to use it yet.

    Years ago I purchased probably a dozen of the Wooden Memories project plans that I am interested in digitizing the full size paper drawings so I can cut the parts with my CNC Router. I could take high definition photographs and use Aspire to convert the bitmaps to vectors but I am sure I would get tired of the process long before I got even close to finishing. This is why I have a current interest in Stan's digitizing expertise.

    It seems to me that Stan started with a photo of the heron and then had it printed so he could convert the paper drawing to vectors so he can machine the heron. I have the prints already so mine is a lesser task.

  11. #11
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    Hi Keith,

    I purchased my 44' x 60" digitizing tablet here:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/CNC-Plasma-...sAAOSwubRXOI2I

    I believe that Stan also has the Jumbo tracer here:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/CNC-Plasma-...sAAOSwcwhVQuOi

    I think that you might find either one of these suitable for tracing your project plans. Perhaps the latest Aspire V10 node editing improvements will possibly simplify the post processing.

    Stan has quite a few Youtube videos demonstrating how to use the tablets and the software.

    David

    Logic Trace 44 x 60.jpg Logic Trace Jumbo.jpg

  12. #12
    What I like the most is using the jumbo boards to draw out a full sized boats and cut it on the cnc
    I enjoyed this project and have done a few more since

    https://youtu.be/_Z0H7fR4wGE
    What I also would like if anyone can help , i would like full sized plans to built an aircraft floats
    as they are about 16 feet long, when i was a teenager my neighbor built a float plane and the plywood floats
    but today floats are not wood and plywood , they are aluminum so that sort of puts me out

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