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Thread: Setting up for Milling

  1. #1

    Setting up for Milling

    As I mentioned in my recent Intro, planning to buy a HM126 next month.
    I have several basic questions on downed logs regarding stacking & prep work.
    No knowing a lot about tree species, the guys that dropped these said they are referred to as either
    Rock oak or Chestnut Oak. Most are 12-16” with a few going 22-26”.
    I live in Md. above Frederick. They are mostly Acorn bearing and grow in very Rocky/Mountainous terrain.

    I am moving 20+ trees that were dropped 1-year ago (Oct-2018)
    1) Once I get them staged where my Mill will be, should I still “Seal” the ends?
    Should I try to elevate them off of the ground after they have been on the ground a year now?
    2) I have a dozen more that were dropped 1-week ago. From what I’ve read, these should be up off the ground and sealed ASAP. Hoping to get these milled and stickered before the new year.

    Appreciate any guidance.
    High Mountain Woodcrafters (HMW)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Winston Salem, NC
    Posts
    111
    Hi Bruce, and Welcome

    1. If the ends haven't been sealed by now, I wouldn't worry about it. If you want to have a better chance of not having checking/cracks, what you can do is once you get them where they will be staged, cut a couple of inches off of each end to get a fresh, relatively clean cut - and then seal the ends. Give it a day or three, and then mill away.

    2. Having them off the ground is more important after you've slabbed them, but I will say they will be easier to move if they're already up a bit - old shipping pallets are good for this.

    3. The ones dropped a week ago would do better if sealed and elevated out of the dirt as soon as possible - unless you are going for the spalted look. . . . or the bugs/ants look.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,291
    Quote Originally Posted by Flamone LaChaud View Post
    Hi Bruce, and Welcome

    1. If the ends haven't been sealed by now, I wouldn't worry about it. If you want to have a better chance of not having checking/cracks, what you can do is once you get them where they will be staged, cut a couple of inches off of each end to get a fresh, relatively clean cut - and then seal the ends. Give it a day or three, and then mill away.

    2. Having them off the ground is more important after you've slabbed them, but I will say they will be easier to move if they're already up a bit - old shipping pallets are good for this.

    3. The ones dropped a week ago would do better if sealed and elevated out of the dirt as soon as possible - unless you are going for the spalted look. . . . or the bugs/ants look.

    Very good advice from Flamone above.

    One thing that I would add is that end sealer is only effective if applied within 3 days of a fresh cut on the log ends. So for the newer logs I would suggest trimming an inch or so from the ends before applying the sealer. The older logs I probably wouldn't worry about.

    If logs are left on the ground they spalt more quickly than if they are elevated. However, logs don’t spalt much during the cold months and white oak is a challenge for splatting, because the heart wood resists it. Chestnut white oak - being open pored - will spalt faster than regular white oak though.

    Elevating the logs is always a good idea as it keeps dirt and rocks from becoming embedded. These will either damage or prematurely dull your blades.

    Best of success to you.

    Scott

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