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Thread: Shaper w/Router Bits: Good Idea or Recipe for Regret?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Router bits need high RPMs for clean cutting. Feeding slower does not negate the effect of slow spindle speeds. Three inch panel raisers may work alright, but regular sized bits will be almost useless.
    Johnny

    I personally haven't found this to be true. To be fair and honest about it though, I haven't done it very many times.
    I certainly would not want to do it everyday, but as a DIY'r, type, the few times I did do it, seemed to work okay, it was just a little slow. I was actually more worried about breaking the router bit.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  2. #17
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    I have used router bits in walnut on a milling machine at under 4000 RPM, and the results were perfect.
    Cry "Havoc," and let slip the dogs of bench.

  3. #18
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    I use router bits in my shaper all the time without issue.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Router bits need high RPMs for clean cutting. Feeding slower does not negate the effect of slow spindle speeds. Three inch panel raisers may work alright, but regular sized bits will be almost useless.
    Yup still not true..... no offense but I don't understand why guys continue to regurgitate bad information? Not only does the slower speed not make them useless, its of less impact than one may think. I don't even change my shaper speed to it's max, 6k rpm's is more than enough to get the job done. If the bits too small a diameter to run well at that speed then I probably don't need to be using it on a shaper anyway and I'll throw it on the router table.

    My advice to those who say it won't work is to actually try it out first before condemning it

    JeffD

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Router bits need high RPMs for clean cutting. Feeding slower does not negate the effect of slow spindle speeds. Three inch panel raisers may work alright, but regular sized bits will be almost useless.
    LOL, Please don't tell my G1035 shaper it is useless with regular sized bits, it doesn't know any better and does a great job with any bit i use in it.

    some people

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by John M Bailey View Post
    ...some people
    ...some people aren't too particular about their routing.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  7. #22
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    Wow!
    I think we've strayed a bit far, and it's getting a little "snipey".
    Shapers have had router bit adapters for at least 50 years. (My machine is from the 60- 70's.) So router bits do work, there is no doubt. A sharp well kept router bit will work fine on a shaper. How long one will last in a production environment is another question altogether.
    I have a Whiteside 45 degree lock miter that doesn't work well in a shaper table. The two cutter wing design, without limiters makes for a lot of vibration. My Amana lock miter shaper cutter with 3 cutters and designed limiters works extremely well. This is just an example.
    A router bit panel raiser profile in a shaper is still a multi pass process, or you risk breaking, or distorting that bit. A panel raiser shaper cutter is a one and done, or maybe two passes, the second being very light. Same goes for the cope and stick cutters depending on size. It's a compromise, that has to be admitted. It works, but it is a compromise
    I think that if you're using router bits in a shaper table on a consistent basis, you might not truly be taking full advantage of either tool, or machine.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 10-26-2019 at 10:35 AM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Duncan View Post
    Yup still not true..... no offense but I don't understand why guys continue to regurgitate bad information? Not only does the slower speed not make them useless, its of less impact than one may think. I don't even change my shaper speed to it's max, 6k rpm's is more than enough to get the job done. If the bits too small a diameter to run well at that speed then I probably don't need to be using it on a shaper anyway and I'll throw it on the router table.

    My advice to those who say it won't work is to actually try it out first before condemning it

    JeffD
    I run router bits in a Bridgeport at 3200rpms. They cut cleanly. No burning and very little dust, they usually make clean shavings. I’d certainly rather have it run at high speed, but it’s been fine.

    Machines have the advantage (in many cases) of tighter runout, less deflection at the spindle, consistent power and it they’re fitted with equipment to do so they’re often able to feed at a consistent rate.
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 10-26-2019 at 10:20 AM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Router bits need high RPMs for clean cutting. Feeding slower does not negate the effect of slow spindle speeds. Three inch panel raisers may work alright, but regular sized bits will be almost useless.
    This has been my experience as well. Fair number of combo machine customers over the years who got router spindles for their machines. Tiny bits will not cut well but larger panel raisers, etc, actually work nicely.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  10. #25
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    The bottom line here...yes you can use router bits in a shaper including small ones. They will work. They will cut wood and with care on feeding, produce an acceptable, if not decent result. A shaper isn't "ideal", however, for this purpose because the the generally slower rotational speed can't get into where the smaller diameter cutter is getting the best chip load during the cut relative to feed speed. That can cause more heat on the cutter (the chips are what takes the heat away) and one might get lower quality including more tear-out with the slower rotation. The best setup is to have both a router table and a shaper for the broadest capability, but that's not always practical for every shop and every woodworker. So do what's best for you...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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