Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Water pressure gauges

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,699

    Water pressure gauges

    Which water pressure gauges are designed to be permanently installed in water line? I assume such a gauge is different from from a "test gauge". If a gauge has a small male threaded connector and doesn't say "test gauge", can we assume it is designed for permanent installation?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,697
    Blog Entries
    11
    A gauge is a gauge differing only by size, accuracy, range, dampening and other features. Then you can go digital. A test gauge is likely more accurate and calibrated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,222
    A permanent gauge should really be mounted on a shutoff valve so when the Bourden tube cracks it can be shutoff to stop the leak. They do make gauges with pinholes in the input passage so they do not bounce around so much as the pressure varies. Or liquid filled to reduce vibration. Or you can buy a nipple with a restricter in it for a regular guage.
    The Bourden tube is normally brass or bronze of some type. Stainless steel is also common.
    The tube may be fine but the gear works can be gummed up by spider webs and rust.
    A good gauge should never have a stop pin at either end of the needle travel.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 10-19-2019 at 10:01 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,699
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    A gauge is a gauge differing only by size, accuracy, range, dampening and other features.
    Hence my question is: Which gauges have the feature of being designed to be continually under pressure ? - as opposed to being designed to be momentarily under pressure when temporarily attached for testing purposes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,697
    Blog Entries
    11
    I am not sure that any gauge would not be designed to be continuously under pressure. Can you further detail your use and the gauge you may have in mind? Of course a gauge measuring pressure of a corrosive or very hot or very cold liquid would need to be designed for that purpose.
    NOW you tell me...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
    Posts
    3,824
    Pretty much any gauge that has a high enough reading will do it. Just go to the borg and get a water pump gauge

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,699
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    I am not sure that any gauge would not be designed to be continuously under pressure.
    Ok, but I'm not sure that any gauge would be designed to be continuously under pressure.

    Can you further detail your use and the gauge you may have in mind?
    I want to install a gauge upstream of a pressure regulator on the main water line to a house. If that's not advisable, I want to make a provision to temporarily install a gauge there to test water pressure.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,470
    Stephen

    Look for an Ashcroft, 2-1/2" to 4", stainless steel ,glycerin filled gauge, in the range you need. You need to determine if you want bottom mount, or back mount.
    This gauge can stay under pressure for the rest of your life.
    Other than when they are being calibrated, I have had Ashcroft's, US Gauge ,and Helicoid's, at work, under pressure ,since the early 70's when the were installed.

    "Test" gauge is a term. Generally it will be a more resolute gauge, perhaps with a higher accuracy spec, with customer feature, such as MIN/MAX memory needles, defined areas of interest,or suppressed and elevated zero's. Stuff like that. It's still a basic gauge inside.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 10-20-2019 at 4:44 PM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  9. #9
    If you are installing a gauge up stream of a pressure regulator, I would install a tee and put a shut off valve in the tee so I could remove the gauge when ever I wanted.

    I would make sure that any automatic valves such as a washing machine, dishwasher or lawn sprinkler system does not produce any pressure spikes in system. The Bourdon tube will help dampen out any pressure spikes or water hammer.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 10-20-2019 at 6:05 PM.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,697
    Blog Entries
    11
    If you are just curious about your pressure, just get a cheap 0-100 psi gauge designed to mount on a hose bib.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    1,270
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Water-So...2-4L/203449559


    $9 at Home Depot, not everything in life needs to be so complicated.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    If you are just curious about your pressure, just get a cheap 0-100 psi gauge designed to mount on a hose bib.
    If you do this, mount it on one are of a Y connector(with the little valves) so you can vent the pressure. When you want to take it off.

    We put a whole house pressure regulator in and only occasionally need to check on it ( i.e every couple of years I get curious)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    3,665
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Stephen

    Look for an Ashcroft, 2-1/2" to 4", stainless steel ,glycerin filled gauge, in the range you need. You need to determine if you want bottom mount, or back mount.
    This gauge can stay under pressure for the rest of your life.
    Other than when they are being calibrated, I have had Ashcroft's, US Gauge ,and Helicoid's, at work, under pressure ,since the early 70's when the were installed.

    "Test" gauge is a term. Generally it will be a more resolute gauge, perhaps with a higher accuracy spec, with customer feature, such as MIN/MAX memory needles, defined areas of interest,or suppressed and elevated zero's. Stuff like that. It's still a basic gauge inside.

    I agree on the Ashcroft gauges. WGG is also pretty good. Used to use both of these in extreme environments that no gauge survived long in, but these did the best.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,697
    Blog Entries
    11
    Here is one that will keep track of pressure surges and mounts to a hose bib. https://www.zoro.com/winters-max-poi...lf/i/G7490086/
    NOW you tell me...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    84
    100 psi gauge would not last here as city pressure can be over 130 psi depending on your elevation. Neighbor put a Pressure Reducing valve in to drop his house to 80 psi. I changed the pressure tank on the hot water tank to double the size, two different solutions to same problem.
    As to the gauge select once at twice regular pressure as a starting point. Once you get over 50 operating psi(approximately) then you should pick a gauge where the operating pressure will be in the 50-75% of gauge range. Valve in line with the gauge is always handy to be able to change gauge as needed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •