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Thread: Getting photos off old hard drive

  1. #31
    I use this device at work. It has two slots that can take either 2.5" or 3.5" SATA drives, and has USB ports and memory card readers built in. It comes with software allowing you to do disk-to-disk cloning but I have never used that. As a hard drive/card reader it works well. The model is CH-329U3S, though I'm not sure of the brand. I bought it a couple of years ago at a local computer store for about $40.

    Derek
    IMG_0552.jpg

  2. #32
    Bert Kemp,

    The archive drive is a 3.5" mechanical SATA drive: the larger connector is for the data and the smaller is power.

    If you have a computer built into a Thermaltake case, it's very likely that the case will accommodate at least two and probably three 3.5" SATA drives. My method to extract the photos is to install the archive drive into the current computer. However, that will require the proper bracket- the "caddy" which in your photo is the green plastic sliding mounting for the drive. With the drive mounted, that slides into the new computer case, plus the SATA data cable and power cable. The files can be copied form one internal drive to another easily using Windows Explorer.

    That's a bit fussy in terms of collecting the parts and knowing where to attach the the cables to the motherboard, so the USB external enclosure that others have mentioned is the logical alternative.

    Something like this:



    https://www.newegg.com/p/0VN-0003-000K9 ($16)

    1. This is tool free, so it's obvious when the cover is slid open how the connectors on the drive plug into the fixed connectors in the enclosure.

    2. Connect the USB cable to the USB port on the computer. Connect the power supply cable

    3. Start the computer

    4. Start Windows Explorer

    5. Turn on the enclosure power.

    6. Windows Explorer will display the connector of the new drive in a window and assign a drive letter- it may be D:, E:, F: etc. depending on how many drives and partitions you have.

    7. Using Windows Explorer, on the internal computer drive, create a new folder named "Files Old Computer_10.21.19" or similar.

    8. Arrange Windows Explorer such that the left column display the drives: C:OS, D:, E. etc.

    9. Click on the old drive assigned letter so the contents will be displayed in the right column.

    10. Select all the files you intend to transfer from the old drive.

    11. Right click on the selected files and holding the button, drag the files over the new folder.

    12. Release the button, look down the list of actions and select "Copy Here". This will mean that you are not deleting any of the original files.

    13. Let the files be copied onto the new drive. don't do anything else on the computer wile it's running. There will be a progress window that shows when it is complete.

    14. When the files transfer is shown complete, click on the some of the files in the new folder and make sure they are readable. Explorer will display a preview of photos which will typically end in .JPG or .PNG.

    15. Create new folders in various categories to organize the photos: the kids, vacations, the boat, recent projects, etc.

    16. With the photo files displayed on the right side of Explorer and the vrious new folders on the left side. Right click on each photo or group of photos drag over the new folder for that category, release and choose "Move Here"

    When finished, leave the old drive in the enclosure awhile in order to check that everything is properly extracted and copied. Eventually, that drive can be very useful as a protective backup. Only run the drive when backing up and the files will be protected against viruses or the failure of the main computer drive.

    This process can take quite awhile, but be very patient, do it carefully in stages, and never delete anything even if it seems you've got it all. There are always more files.


    Alan

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Meyer View Post
    I use this device at work. It has two slots that can take either 2.5" or 3.5" SATA drives, and has USB ports and memory card readers built in. It comes with software allowing you to do disk-to-disk cloning but I have never used that. As a hard drive/card reader it works well. The model is CH-329U3S, though I'm not sure of the brand. I bought it a couple of years ago at a local computer store for about $40.

    Derek
    IMG_0552.jpg
    That would likely get my vote though it's not very portable if that's a requirement. SSDs are great but they have one undesirable trait as I understand it -- they don't give any warning when they're about to die and it requires $$$$ get get data off an SSD if it's possible at all. Get an external dock or enclosure and a spinning hard drive. Back up your data folders on a routine basis to a spinning hard drive then remove it from the dock. Replace only to update the backups. For critical stuff like medical or financial records it doesn't hurt to have 2 backups, perhaps hard drive & DVD or flash drive. Ask people who've had their data encrypted by a bad guy how useful backups can be.

  4. #34
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    I agree that the docking stations are the Cat's Meow. They connect via USB and will work with both Windows and Mac computers. With the new IOS and iPad-OS you might be able to use them for mobile devices as well with a dongle so you can provide power. They are convenient to use, easy to connect and provide the best backup solution IMO. Old hard drives that I would have discarded in the past are pretty cheap backup drives now.

  5. #35
    Is any of this likely to work on a windows XP laptop hard drive?
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    Is any of this likely to work on a windows XP laptop hard drive?
    They should, I would think. XP uses the NTFS file system, same as Win10.

  7. #37
    The unit I posted a picture of will work on Windows XP.

  8. #38
    Thanks fellas.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry McFadden View Post
    Sorry Steven.... but why over complicate things? The OP says he is not computer savy and you want him to try that?... all he needs to do is get a SATA to USB cable like in the picture and he can get anything he wants off of the old drive...

    Attachment 418075
    This. No need for enclosures or anything else. $8 bucks at Walmart and you’re done.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  10. #40
    Bert, unless you are comfortable understanding all the advice, I would suggest taking the old drive into a computer store like Best Buy and ask them to copy the files you want onto a USB flash drive which you can take home, plug into the USB port on your new computer and copy the files onto the hard drive. Hang on to the USB flash drive as a backup drive or to use to transfer files in the future. USB drives range in capacity and price from less than $15 for 8Gb to $200 for 1000GB. They can select the size you need based on the number of photos on the drive.

  11. #41
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    UPDATE

    I got the cables I needed and they worked like a charm just plugged them in turned on the computer and it showed up as an E drive. Thanks for all the help. Now I have an old broken laptop Im hoping I can pull the hard drive from that and do the same thing
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  12. #42
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    Bert - Good for you. Once you get them all, I suggest you back them up to a portable hard drive. I just checked my Lightroom catalogs and I have 168,836 pics (I don't delete much), backed up on 2 portables. One in the fire safe in the house, the other in a fire safe in my office/shop. I highly recommend backing them up and keeping the backups in different locations.
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post
    Bert - Good for you. Once you get them all, I suggest you back them up to a portable hard drive. I just checked my Lightroom catalogs and I have 168,836 pics (I don't delete much), backed up on 2 portables. One in the fire safe in the house, the other in a fire safe in my office/shop. I highly recommend backing them up and keeping the backups in different locations.
    yes Im looking into hard drive and the cloud.
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bert Kemp View Post
    yes Im looking into hard drive and the cloud.
    You have a hard drive(s) and the cable already. Reconnect that SATA hard drive , save anything else you want, reformat the drive, use it as one of your backups. Store it in an anti-static bag (probably free for the asking at any Best Buy or computer store if you don’t already have a few lying around from other electronic purchases), along with the cable.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

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