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Thread: How to attach 2x6's around shower pan

  1. #1
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    How to attach 2x6's around shower pan

    Typical construction for a bathroom shower uses lengths of 2x6's set between the studs around the base of the shower walls. Are these 2x6's toenailed in place? Is there some better or simpler way to install them?

  2. #2
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    Waterford, PA
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    Toe nailed is typical, though I'd probably pocket screw them with SS screws (I'm anal about things by water, even though it should be dry).

  3. #3
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    Either "toenailed" or screwed in the same manner will work just fine. I personally use screws as much as possible simply because my hands can't handle much hammering. I tend to use "deck" screws for things like this for the same reason that Lisa mentions the SS screws. If you install every other one first, you can screw/nail through the studs straight for some of them with normal stud spacing and then only have to "toenail" nails or screws on every other one. For really tight spaces, pocket screws are great and Kreg makes longer ones specifically for this kind of task.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 10-19-2019 at 10:18 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Pre-drill under size pilot holes and then use galvanized coated nails.

  5. #5
    Predrill pilot for toe screws. Deck screws not drywall screws. Assuming receptor and walls are constructed correctly, there should never be any moisture at the fastener level which would mitigate need for corrosion resistance. Start right to end right.

    Depending on where you are in construction and FWIW, I have gone completely to surface applied membranes (Kerdi, Hydroban are two examples) which eliminate the second, potentially soggy, upper mud bed in conventional shower construction. Simplifies curb as well.

  6. #6
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    For some awkward corners I will screw a 2x2 vertical to the stud setback 1.5 inches. Then screw the filler board to it with screws straight on.

  7. #7
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    In a previous life, I was a builder and framed my own houses. I would use #10 galvanized common nails in framing.
    I never experienced failure. My houses are still standing 20 years later. If you are concerned about the wood splitting,
    pre-drilling eliminates the splitting.

  8. #8
    My dad used to build houses WAY back, he said the reason nails work is because you bend them as you're hammering them... I've pre-drilled many a piece of wood for a screw, but never for a nail...
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Rawlings View Post
    Deck screws not drywall screws.
    Absolutely! Drywall screws should never be used for construction purposes...they are brittle and easily snap off. They are also thin and corrode quickly. The only thing good about them is they are inexpensive...which is why too many folks use them for things other than holding up wall board.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    If you are concerned about the wood splitting, pre-drilling eliminates the splitting.
    So does blunting the point of the nail when that's a concern.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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