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Thread: Ripping Blade

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Prairie Village, KS
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    Ripping Blade

    I am working on a potting bench that I am making out of solid white oak. Other than cutting boards or a few shop projects using construction lumber, this is my first real project with solid wood. Last night I was milling some parts out of 8/4 stock and my 1.75HP SawStop was on the struggle bus. I use a full kerf Forrest WWII 40T blade and it really struggled through that 8/4 stock. I actually overheated the motor once and tripped the switch breaker. That got me thinking about getting ripping blade.

    I'd rather not get a thin kerf blade just so I dont have to fuss with multiple riving knives so do you all think a 24T full kerf blade would be good enough or do you think my saw will always struggle with a full kerf blade in thicker stock?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    I would go for 24T, full kerf. If that doesn't do it, motor power is the issue. Or just live with a real slow feed rate. Good luck.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    19,701
    Agree. I ran a full kerf 24 tooth FTG even on my 1HP contractor. Listen to your machine and adjust your feed rate so as not to overload it. Feather boards can help assure smooth cuts on longer rips.
    Buy a man a plane ticket and hell fly for a day.
    Push a man out of a plane
    and hell fly for the rest of his life.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Denver
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    Hi Tim,

    You're on the right track. You'll be amazed at how a "real" rip blade will perform vs your 40 tooth blade.

    I've been running Freud industrial 24 tooth rip blades lately, model #LM72M008. I keep two on hand so I always have a sharp one.

    If you like Forrest blades, by all means get a Forrest rip blade. Forrest makes outstanding products. It looks like they have a 20 tooth model - #WW10206125 and the reviews are great.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #5
    As others have noted a 24 tooth ripping blade will perform much better than a combination blade when ripping hard wood. I recommend the Freud Glueline rip blade.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
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    35
    I have the 20 tooth Forrest 10" WW II Saw Blade that I use for ripping hardwood on my 3hp PCS. I recently finished ripping White Oak up to about 2" thick, it works great. It will cut as fast as I want to push the wood through the saw.

    The finish is not a good as my 40 tooth WW II, but I think that's to be expected.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
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    564
    I also recommend the Freud Glue Line Rip blade or the Freud Heavy Duty Rip blade; I ran both on my old Ridgid TS 3650, which was not a very powerful saw. The HD blade is Flat Top Grind, which is good if you're making non-through grooves and you don't want the bat ears.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  8. #8
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    Jul 2017
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    Prairie Village, KS
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    Gonna go with the Forrest. Woodcraft has them in stock and I need to make some sawdust tonight.

    Thanks, everyone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I use the 20T WW-II blade for "heavy" ripping...and it's the same kerf width as the other Forrest blades I use so zero adjustments ever for kerf width. (One reason I stick with a standard blade since I cut on both sides of the blade on my slider, depending on what I'm doing, and need the scales on both sides to be accurate)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    I have a 1.5 hp Unisaw, and it does rip 8/4 stock with a combo blade. I'd check a couple of possibilities for your poor performance.
    * Is the combo blade sharp?
    * Is the lumber pinching the blade at the rear? This generally comes down to whether you're using a splitter or riving knife.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    I am working on a potting bench that I am making out of solid white oak. Other than cutting boards or a few shop projects using construction lumber, this is my first real project with solid wood. Last night I was milling some parts out of 8/4 stock and my 1.75HP SawStop was on the struggle bus. I use a full kerf Forrest WWII 40T blade and it really struggled through that 8/4 stock. I actually overheated the motor once and tripped the switch breaker. That got me thinking about getting ripping blade.

    I'd rather not get a thin kerf blade just so I dont have to fuss with multiple riving knives so do you all think a 24T full kerf blade would be good enough or do you think my saw will always struggle with a full kerf blade in thicker stock?

    Thanks
    The best rip blade I've used is actually a fiber cement blade where the 10" blade only had like 6 teeth.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Prairie Village, KS
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    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    I have a 1.5 hp Unisaw, and it does rip 8/4 stock with a combo blade. I'd check a couple of possibilities for your poor performance.
    * Is the combo blade sharp?
    * Is the lumber pinching the blade at the rear? This generally comes down to whether you're using a splitter or riving knife.
    Mine will rip 8/4 stock but it's not easy. This white oak I am working with had a lot of tension and was pinching past the blade. The one time it was pinching really badly was the time I blew the fuse.

    I picked up the WWII 20T last night and will be giving it go tonight.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That blade "eats wood", Tim...it should do the job for you. Even though my saw uses 12" blades, it's the one 10" blade I've purposefully kept from the previous setup because it does good work on knarly material.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    Mine will rip 8/4 stock but it's not easy. This white oak I am working with had a lot of tension and was pinching past the blade. The one time it was pinching really badly was the time I blew the fuse.

    I picked up the WWII 20T last night and will be giving it go tonight.
    If your wood is pinching the blade bad enough to blow a fuse, that's a very bad situation. The rear of the blade is moving upwards. When the wood pinches the rear of the blade, there is the danger that the blade will throw it up into the air or into your face. The tablesaw's splitter or riving knife is supposed to prevent the pinching, so you should be using it. If even that doesn't prevent the pinching, I'd send that piece of lumber off to the burn pile.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Austin Texas
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    1,592
    If you really want to use that piece of pinching wood, you can do a partial thickness rip from each side of the timber and then finish the final cut through with a hand saw. Like Jaime says, you are travelling in a dangerous territory if you are blowing fuses. I'm not so sure a new WW blade will solve the problem.
    David

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