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Thread: Jointer Safety

  1. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    My first three years in business I dimensioned every piece of stock by hand, joint and thickness.

    I donít disagree with your process but Iím not sure what youíre implying with respect to my length callout? I assume you mean to suggest that I joint boards before turning them into parts, if that is the case it is incorrect. I work long material for table tops, bookcase sides, door stiles, etc. I rough cut into smaller when the parts are smaller.
    You do awesome work, Brian! I was just trying to make a more general point. I wasn't talking about you specifically, and I apologize if anyone got that impression.

  2. #47
    Dave,any board that has a bend that is similar to a piece of sheet metal bent sharply in a tool for that purpose should
    just be cut off before any facing is done.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,405
    I was flashing back to some of the used jointers I’ve seen. Mostly Craigslist ads.
    Never assume the knives in a used jointer that hasn’t been set buy you are correct. I’ve seen knives too thick,too wide. And once I saw the gibs backwards.
    I tested a jointer out in Oxnard once that had the tables so out of wack I almost got my self in some big trouble with a piece of hickory.
    Im also guilty of jointing longer then needed boards for the simple pleasure of using my machine.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I was flashing back to some of the used jointers Iíve seen. Mostly Craigslist ads.
    Never assume the knives in a used jointer that hasnít been set buy you are correct. Iíve seen knives too thick,too wide. And once I saw the gibs backwards.
    I tested a jointer out in Oxnard once that had the tables so out of wack I almost got my self in some big trouble with a piece of hickory.
    Im also guilty of jointing longer then needed boards for the simple pleasure of using my machine.
    Good Luck
    Agree. Some times the machine is being sold because the owner thinks he is just never going to get it set up.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    6,126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    You do awesome work, Brian! I was just trying to make a more general point. I wasn't talking about you specifically, and I apologize if anyone got that impression.
    Thank you and thanks also for clarifying. I do also agree, the shortest reasonable length and will add until around 20” or so for any new person reading along. I generally cut double lengths for short parts and just add 1” per side on longer boards.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    476
    If you wish to understand safety, you will have to be very careful in how you interpret the information provided.
    Some people don't use guards, some use all of the safety devices on the market, and swear that you are suicidal if you don't,
    Some work with their fingers a fraction of an inch from the blades and are relaxed and comfortable, some quake in fear at the thought of being within a foot of the blade.
    Maybe you should ask about the facts, the results, not the opinions.
    Find out who had the most accidents, and under what conditions.
    understand also that safety is a personal thing, not a statistic, Statistics are great for insurance purposes. If you are the one in a million that it happens to, it's very personal.
    Study and understand you machine, tooling and materials, And you will work with confidence and control. Smooth, relaxed, but firm motions.
    Develop process and procedures that work for you.
    Have the discipline to follow them.
    Don't follow others.
    Understand Yourself, and the pressure to get stuff done, learn to know when to quit and pick it up tomorrow.
    Learn to live in the second.
    The only job that exists is the one that you are doing now.
    Only when that one is done do you become aware of the next one.
    Eventually there will be no more to do and you will be finished.
    If you think ahead you will not be concentrating on what you are doing.
    Safety is in your control.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cache Valley, Utah
    Posts
    1,496
    I have a 12" Invicta jointer with Byrd head. When face jointing I usually use a home made hooked push block on the back end of the board, and a rubber grout float for the front push block. Rubber grout floats are cheap and grip the wood very well. When I am face jointing a lot of longer stock I swing the power feeder around and set it up. It makes things a lot faster and safer.

  8. #53
    Good thread. None of us is so experienced to not benefit from a safety refresher. The jointer is a deceptive machine from a safety standpoint, not as obviously menacing as a table saw or spindle shaper. I once had a guy tell me a table saw can cut your finger or hand off, but a jointer will turn it into scalloped potatoes.

    The only two practices I can add/echo to what we've heard here already;

    1. Pay attention, stay present in the moment. I happen to think lapse in concentration is the root of many workshop accidents. I don't think any manner of safety aids are a substitute for the operator's focus.

    2. Try to hook your pinky finger over the top of the jointer fence, or top of the board when edge jointing. When your hand is hooked or anchored to something, whether the machine fence, or the workpiece, it's one line of defense to prevent it from flying into the cutter. I try to practice this at the miter saw, jointer, router table, everywhere I can. Learned it from a woodworking master who has all ten fingers, none shortened.

    Edwin
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 10-19-2019 at 10:15 PM.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    This is the one I use on my jointer.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DNX3N7S...ing=UTF8&psc=1
    Thanks, that looks pretty cool, and price seems more reasonable that the original Gripper.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    196
    I just ran across a Craigslist posting that made me think of this thread. The last sentence reads "This jointer has severed me well".
    https://syracuse.craigslist.org/tls/...998977104.html

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