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Thread: Is Turning addictive?

  1. #1

    Is Turning addictive?

    I have noticed that since I have started turning my flat work production has suffered significantly.
    The lure of instant gratification for a time strapped person... from rough blank to a finished/signed piece in matter of 1-2 hrs is hard to beat.

    How do I go back to flat work now?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Don't think about going back. This forum is full of people who use their table saw as a table to support turning tools, supplies, and projects.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Isn't that why it's called a table saw? A saw that functions as a table? I actually did use it the other day with the blade spinning. Had to remove all the aforementioned tools/supplies and half finished projects.
    Turning is only addictive if you start.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    There is nothing to replace the turning fix.
    Ken

  5. #5
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    Table saw and turning addiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Iwamoto View Post
    Isn't that why it's called a table saw? A saw that functions as a table?...
    Turning is only addictive if you start.
    I've seen much evidence over the years about the addiction. Turning for fun certainly fits in the lifestyle of many busy people. I can always go to the shop and start and finish something simple in an hour or two or make good progress on something that may take a day or so. Compare that with making a cabinet, table, or chair!

    I'd be hard pressed to give up my table saw even though I use it rarely. (PM66 with Robland sliding table)
    But most of the time it supports my other addiction, that of taking photos of turnings!

    photo_cube.jpg BOC_C_Jack_01_IMG_6687.jpg

    Now turning for a job or for the purpose of making money may be another issue. I've know a several people who seem to spend all their time turning things just for sale, craft fairs, consignments, web sales. One guy in particular appears to be moderately successful but does not always come across as excessively cheerful. I personally am not the least interested a job!

    JKJ

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    I, on the other hand, jumped in with both feet and dint take to it that well. Since sold a lot of the original equipment, and now i have a little comet II for the 60 mins a year i need a lathe. Im also sure skill has something to do with it. I am a novice turner, and therefore i dont get the same results as quickly as another turner may. Finally, I gravitate towards larger projects with joinery.

    Glad you are taking to it so well. I dont know anyone that is 50:50. It seems you either like turning or you dont.

  7. #7
    No for the really time strapped. Turn a single 1 x 1 x 6 piece of basswood into 4 Christmas ornaments in as many minutes. and then go back to work. after an hour or so, do it again. I have a box of ornaments to donate/give away.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Kane View Post
    I, on the other hand, jumped in with both feet and dint take to it that well. Since sold a lot of the original equipment, and now i have a little comet II for the 60 mins a year i need a lathe. Im also sure skill has something to do with it. I am a novice turner, and therefore i dont get the same results as quickly as another turner may. Finally, I gravitate towards larger projects with joinery.

    Glad you are taking to it so well. I dont know anyone that is 50:50. It seems you either like turning or you dont.
    I am fairly new to turning. Took a introductory class last winter at NBSS... right after I bought my lathe. Got to work on PM lathes and Doug Thompsons tools. It was a great jumpstart... Turned 2 bowls.
    Since then it has slowly taken over my shop time entire and likely given me Tennis Elbow in my left arm.... I stopped playing tennis... I continue to turn... draw your own conclusions.... yes its an addiction for me.
    I have a huge haul of Ash/cherry and walnut tree stumps waiting to be processed and made into bowl and other nick nacks. Tennis elbow slowed me down. Everythings wax coated to buy time.

    Thanks for listening folks...

  9. #9
    Sorry I have not got time to post now I have got to get back into the workshop

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashwini Kaul View Post
    ..... and likely given me Tennis Elbow in my left arm....
    Be careful. Repetitive Motion Injury is real.
    Vary your stance. Stretch often. Turn with your left (non dominant) hand. Turning with your left hand opens a lot of ways to turn difficult areas. Take a break and do some other chores.
    I sit at a computer all day, and felt the carpal tunnel (I think) coming. I moved the mouse pad to the left side. It went away. RMI is just that. Doing the same motions over and over..... I'm pretty good with the mouse on the left now. Was hard at first.
    Take care. If you get sidelined with turners elbow, that would be bad.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashwini Kaul View Post
    How do I go back to flat work now?
    Easy. Send me your lathe and all tools and accessories and I'll help you go back.
    Dean Thomas
    KCMO

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashwini Kaul View Post
    I have noticed that since I have started turning my flat work production has suffered significantly.
    The lure of instant gratification for a time strapped person... from rough blank to a finished/signed piece in matter of 1-2 hrs is hard to beat.

    How do I go back to flat work now?
    You might get someone to put "The Club" on the lathe and have someone keep the key.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Chicagoland
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    2,646
    I like to turn and have all the goodies for it. But, my wife keeps giving me these flat-work projects and by the time I finish one project there is another. This causes my lathe to sit often. Plus in making a nice mobile base for my 3520B I became somewhat addicted to welding. Guess I have too many hobbies and need to get rid of one of them or dedicate time to each of them (or I need to retire ).

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
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    819
    I totally agree with Kyle. Turning isn't addictive until you start doing it. I used to be in a woodworkers group and the major interest of most people was turning. They were mostly doing bowls and searching for stock to turn. I tried it but didn't know what I was doing so my results were not good and I returned to mostly to flat work, intarsia and wood carving. Some years later I wanted to turn some pens and bought a mini lathe. I did fine with that and gradually bought a midi lathe for bigger projects. I still favor pens, weed pots, and small stuff even though I did a communion chalice for our church and a big walnut bowl. I still like intarsia also. I guess I'm just pointing out that you can turn small stuff and still enjoy turning. If you are cramped for space, a small lathe can help with that and also lower costs. I have many chisels, but since I'm now an old geezer, I'm a lot more partial to the carbide tools.
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    I guess it really boils down to what you’re making and how passionate you are about it. About 95% of my wood turning projects (large Hollow Forms) take over a year to complete. The other 5% are small items that compliment my flat work.
    For me, if I completed something on the lathe in less than an hour or two, I would have something I made in less than an hour or two. And the same could be said about flat work.
    I have been doing flat work for my entire life and turning for about 5 years. I love turning HF vessels for the challenge it brings both physically and artistically. Turning large HF’s is very physical, extremely laborious, and requires a lot of heavy tooling. Like most projects, however, they are satisfying to look at and photograph before being shipped off to the gallery.
    The guys I have met that gave up flat work for turning were never that passionate about flat work to begin with. I also know a few guys who have very nice lathes that never get used because they prefer flat work.
    If I had to give up my Martin table saw or my VB36,
    It would be the VB. Hope I never need to make that choice.

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