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Thread: Dedicated Table Router

  1. #1
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    Dedicated Table Router

    Hi again, Folks,

    This is my second post to this forum and once again, I look for advice.

    As I haven't had a wood shop for a decade, my previous post regarded what features would be desirable in a modern table saw. The Forum was of great help abd I decided on the Griz G1023RLWX, a 5HP with router extension - https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...-Saw/G1023RLWX. The intent is to install a dedicated router in the extension - that is, the router shall be relegated to table duty only.

    This router must be small (so I can access the saw's handwheel without swearing, but powerful enough to build cabinet doors. Besides power and reliability, ease of bit replacement, height adjustment and collet size versatility is required. What should I look for here?

    Thanks again.

    John

  2. #2
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    Hi John,
    I have the same saw. In my opinion, it would be desirable to install a router lift on the table saw wing. In addition to the convenience of easily adjusting the router height, this will allow for easily lowering the router below table height for clearance with wider cuts on the saw. I prefer the Bosch 1917EVS for router table duty. I would also suggest an enclosure under the router for dust collection. I like the Rockler dust bucket.
    David

    https://www.rockler.com/dust-bucket-...SABEgIGnvD_BwE

  3. #3
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    John: Look at the Milwaukee Router Model 5616. I believe it meets your specifications. I have had one for 14 years, generally dedicated to the router table, and used it for everything from an entertainment center/breakfront with cabinet doors, mortises in table legs, to 1/16" round over to break edges. Take the handles off the fixed base and it should fit.

  4. #4
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    More food for thought. I also have my table on the left; common feed direction and clearance requirements. I set my router table miter slot the same distance from the bit that the tablesaw miter slot is from the blade. I get to use jigs on both machines easily this way. My router table started out as a wing, grew to a table but, is still attached to my saw. I have stayed with this configuration from my contractor saw, trough my hybrid,

    RT_TS 003.jpg

    and to my current saw.

    SawStop (3).jpg

    I get the advantage of additional real estate for both machines. Your "best" configuration will depend on what you do, how you do it and sometimes even more important . . . the room you have to do it in.
    I am familiar with modern idioms but they are outside the vocabulary of what I want to say.

    - George Dyson (composer)

  5. #5
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    For the longest time, I would have recommended the PC 7518 for this task, but my understanding is that in recent years, the quality hasn't been quite as good. So I'd likely go the big Milwaukee...very similar to the PC including the same size motor diameter for compatibility with lifts. It's a heavy duty router...many CNC machines use it as a lower cost alternative to a spindle, in fact. For heavy table use, the smaller 12 amp routers are not going to be quite as capable, but if need be, they certainly can be used.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 10-16-2019 at 9:56 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    I have a Milwaukee 5625 residing in my router table. It's the bigger brother to the 5616 and may be more suitable if your doing raised panel doors or other stuff that used large bits.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2018
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    John,

    I have a Triton MOF001 as a dedicated table router, and am happy with it. One advantage of the Triton is that it doesn't require a separate lift. At 2-1/4 HP, it's powerful enough for the things I do - but I've never attempted raised panel doors with it. Triton also has a larger (3-1/4 HP) model, the TRA001, that I'm sure would have the power you need, but I'm not sure about the size.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McGovern View Post
    Hi again, Folks,

    This is my second post to this forum and once again, I look for advice.

    As I haven't had a wood shop for a decade, my previous post regarded what features would be desirable in a modern table saw. The Forum was of great help abd I decided on the Griz G1023RLWX, a 5HP with router extension - https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...-Saw/G1023RLWX. The intent is to install a dedicated router in the extension - that is, the router shall be relegated to table duty only.

    This router must be small (so I can access the saw's handwheel without swearing, but powerful enough to build cabinet doors. Besides power and reliability, ease of bit replacement, height adjustment and collet size versatility is required. What should I look for here?

    Thanks again.

    John
    John

    I think you have a lot more clearance between the tilt mechanism hand wheel and where the router will actually be located.
    I would get the biggest router I could fit into the space. You know that the project your planning will require the use of bigger router bits, like in the 2-1/2" diameter range. Even with multiple cuts, for the raised panel bit, that's still a big bit to spin at 10,000.
    I haven't kept up with routers for the past few years. I have some "midish" sized PC8529's, and a couple of Festools (OF2200, and OF1400). When my 8529's were table mounted, I drilled a hole in the top, to allow access to the plunge mechanism. (The 8529's can be height adjusted from the top by going through one of column posts.)
    There are any number of router raising systems on the market, should you go that direction, but if you have easy access to the router, it's really not a big deal to adjust height from underneath, using a dial indicator, or iGauge, on top of the table. But you really want a router with a somewhat "finer" method of depth adjustment.

    My experience with respect to dust collection of a table mounted router, is that I will never use a box below the table exclusively. I would always want the maximum amount material possible being extracted from the top. Pulling all of that material down into a box, and then to the dust collector, exposes the router electronics to the maximum possible dust and debris. Pull as much as possible from the top.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 10-16-2019 at 12:51 PM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Upland CA
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    I will only comment on router size. I built my first kitchen on a bench top router table using a PC 690. No lift, simple fence.

    I used a full size panel raising bit and cope/stick set. As I remember, I made three passes for the panel raiser, and one or two (?) for the cope and stick.

    I set the fence at the final position, and used spacers made of masonite or MDF of varying thickness, the last being 1/8" masonite for the finish cut.

    Certainly not recommended for production, but for hobbyist needs, the router does not HAVE to be the newest and biggest.

    PS: now have the big PC in a full size table, but still use spacers, including a 1 /16th thick spacer for that finish cut..eliminates burning like magic.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
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    I guess I should add that the cabinet doors on the entertainment center/breakfront are raised panel - rail and style. Milwaukee 5616 with Freud 99 780. One more thing I learned the hardway is do not enclose the router on 4 sides. It may cause the router to overheat. I took the door to the cabinet off, and have never had a problem since.
    P9170013.jpg
    Last edited by Bill Lyman; 10-16-2019 at 3:17 PM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Lyman View Post
    I guess I should add that the cabinet doors on the entertainment center/breakfront are raised panel - rail and style. Milwaukee 5616 with Freud 99 780. One more thing I learned the hardway is do not enclose the router on 4 sides. It may cause the router to overheat. I took the door to the cabinet off, and have never had a problem since.
    P9170013.jpg
    If you add dust collection the top and bottom of the router you can beat the heat problem....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    If I were to plan on doing much panel raising I'd want one of the 3.25/3.5 rated HP machines and variable speed to get the RPM down around 8,000 - 10,000 for larger horizontal panel raising bits as recommended by most router bit manufacturers. I guess a router lift is required for really fine height adjustment. I have a Router Raizer attachment on a Freud FT2000E (no longer available in the U.S.) It uses a 16 TPI lead screw so isn't that fine but is reasonably fast to raise and lower bits below the table to get them out of the way when using the table saw. A router that has been popular in table use is the Hitachi though I don't see those mentioned much. Under a router table seems like a good place for them; the appearance is umm, 'unique'.
    Last edited by Curt Harms; 10-16-2019 at 6:30 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Hi John,
    I have the same saw. In my opinion, it would be desirable to install a router lift on the table saw wing. In addition to the convenience of easily adjusting the router height, this will allow for easily lowering the router below table height for clearance with wider cuts on the saw. I prefer the Bosch 1917EVS for router table duty. I would also suggest an enclosure under the router for dust collection. I like the Rockler dust bucket.
    David

    https://www.rockler.com/dust-bucket-...SABEgIGnvD_BwE
    Hi David,

    May I ask if you miss the miter slot in the extension? And, what lift do you like?

    My thanks to you and all the others who are holding my hand with another thread. You folks are so helpful.

    John

  14. #14
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    PC 7518 would be my vote
    Regards,

    Tom

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McGovern View Post
    May I ask if you miss the miter slot in the extension? And, what lift do you like?
    The miter slots are in the main table, not the extensions.

    The big Milwaukee can also be used without a lift, but a good lift provides a much nicer user experience. I have the bottom enclosed with a 4" duct and a 2.5" flex that drops from an overhead duct to the fence. Pretty much gets it all.

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