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Thread: liquid hide glue

  1. #1

    liquid hide glue

    Been trying to find out something about liquid hide glue. So far I know that most bottles on the store shelves are already past the "good" date. Has anyone used any of the off the shelf hide glues with any success? If there is really a expiration date, why is it still on the store shelves?

    I need long setup time so I'm afraid to use the hot hide glue. Any thoughts on this subject?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I used it a few years back for veneering a couple of end tables. I liked it for the same reason you you are considering it, long working time. I also didn't have to worry much about bleed through showing because it takes the finish very well. I never noticed an expiration date but I believe I may still have some in the fridge. I'll have to check whenI get home. Anyway it's still holding up so no complaints.

  3. #3
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    You can make your own up fresh by adding urea to freshly prepared hot hide glue. Google for proportions. That's what's in the commercial products.

  4. #4
    I use the Franklin Liquid Hide Glue when I need a long open time, or I need to worry about glue under a finish. It works well and is plenty strong, although it is kind of gooey and a little messy to work with.

    It can go bad, so I don't buy much at a time. If you have any doubts, glue up some test joints to see if they cure properly.

    That said, I tend to stick to Titebond 1 when I can, it is easier to work with.

    Some people have horror stories about it; I'm sure some will appear later in this thread. I've never had any problems using it over the last 20 odd years. My guess is they stem from using batches so old that it didn't cure right or had frozen at some point.

  5. #5
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    have you looked into titebond extend up 15 min of open time Hide glue is 10 min.
    at the store look at the lot Numbers
    from titebond
    Our current lot numbering system is a 10 digit code. The format is: ayymmdd###. The "a" stands for Made in the U.S.A. The "y" is the last digit of the year of manufacture. Digits "mm" represent the month, and "dd" represent the day of the month. The three digits represent the batch number used for quality control purposes. Therefore, a product with the lot number A190415123 was manufactured on April 15, 2019.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin sherriff View Post
    have you looked into titebond extend up 15 min of open time Hide glue is 10 min.
    at the store look at the lot Numbers
    from titebond
    Our current lot numbering system is a 10 digit code. The format is: ayymmdd###. The "a" stands for Made in the U.S.A. The "y" is the last digit of the year of manufacture. Digits "mm" represent the month, and "dd" represent the day of the month. The three digits represent the batch number used for quality control purposes. Therefore, a product with the lot number A190415123 was manufactured on April 15, 2019.
    I suppose if you just put the date on it like grocery vendors, stores would end up with unsold product, but it would certainly be helpful to your ultimate purchasers. Anyway, I have used the Titebond liquid hide glue with success. Virtually always when doing a furniture repair, and other times as well. An additional benefit it will adhere a somewhat looser fit than the other glues.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    There is a cottage industry in San Diego that makes liquid hide glue and makes it fresh upon order. They do not stock much inventory, so everything is very fresh. Its called Old Brown Hide Glue, and it is mail order, although some Woodworkers Supply retail locations carry it. I order mine directly from the supplier. It has an 18 month expiration date, and the inventory is rarely over a month old when received. Good stuff. It has a 30 minute open time. Any longer time required, and I used West System Epoxy.

    https://oldbrownglue.com/index.php
    Regards,

    Tom

  8. #8
    Ray, I use hide glue for all the furniture I build. Typically I mix my own hot glue and extend the open time by using either salt or urea to suppress the gel time of the glue. A warmer shop and warmer wood helps extend the open time for all hide glue ups..

    I have also had really good success with Olde Brown glue, directly from Olde Brown. I wouldn’t call Olde Brown liquid in the bottle, at least that hasn’t been my experience, one still needs to warm the glue in warm water to make the glue liquid and spreadable.
    Last edited by Robert LaPlaca; 10-16-2019 at 3:29 PM.

  9. #9
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    Supposedly you can tell if hide glue is still good by putting some on one finger, squeeze 2 fingers together, spread them and see if the glue forms strings. If it does, it should still be good. Of course another surer way to check would be to glue up two sticks, let them cure and break them apart. If they fail at the glue line the glue is likely no good.

  10. #10
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    Ditto as to what Robert said. Old Brown Hide Glue really cannot be used right out of the bottle. It needs to be warmed up between 100-140 degrees. I think 180 degrees is the limit.
    Regards,

    Tom

  11. #11
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    I like hide glue for certain things but it’s not a glue I use very often. I have a limited number if clamps and keeping work clamped for 24hrs is not something I can do in my shop easily. Much prefer clamping for 1-2hrs with PVA.

    I generally greatly prefer basic PVA glues to hide, Titebond I is reversible by steam as far as I’m aware. There are tons of pieces of furniture made with basic PVA glued that have been repaired. Same as hide glue.

    Hide glue can fail over time just the same as PVA. I tend to draw-bore anything that I want to make stay together in a permanent fashion but would like it to be easily taken apart down the road. It is significantly easier than taking apart a glue joint.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #12
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    FYI: DEF liquid sold for use with diesel engines is about 1/3 urea 2/3 deionised water. Cost is around 13 dollars for 2.5 gallons in auto parts stores. No idea on proportions to mix solid hide glue flakes with it. Probably need to dilute it with extra water. It has shelf life of around two years. No idea if urea powder has a shelf life or not.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 10-17-2019 at 5:39 PM.

  13. #13
    Thanks to all for their input. Really appreciaate it. Now to make the decision as to what to use. Decision, decisions.....
    Ray

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Clayton , North Carolina
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    I've been using Old Brown Glue for a year or so and like it a lot. I work slow (cause I'm old) and the long set up time suits me well. I have never heated it up prior to use and have found no problems. I do refrigerate it if I'm not going to be in the shop much but I use the small bottle and it takes very little time to come to room temp. I order it direct because the first time I used it I ordered from Amazon and it was already half expired. oldbrownglue.com has additional info and only sends fresh and claims a shelf life of one year but I've found with refrigeration it lasts longer.

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