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Thread: I have one of these

  1. #1
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    I have one of these

    And I really like it. I've had it for years.

    You can store a lot of lumber on the wall, keeping it flat.

    https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/...g+oct+2nd+send

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    And I really like it. I've had it for years.

    You can store a lot of lumber on the wall, keeping it flat.

    https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/...g+oct+2nd+send
    A person can also build a larger one with better support for a lower cost:

    Wood Rack.jpg

    This stands away from the wall since the wall space is already in use. My lathe is on the other side of this. Recently a rack was attached to the back of it to hold my lathe tools in a very convenient location.

    If anyone is interested more pictures can be taken of the base and joinery.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 10-14-2019 at 3:53 PM. Reason: wording
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Or you could go home made without the supports in the front getting in the way. 3/4" pipe, floor brackets and 3x4's in this case.
    20191014_144148.jpg 20191014_144234.jpg
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  4. #4
    600 lbs of wood ain't much wood. Maybe close to 120 or so B/F, not enough to build many workbenches.

    ken

  5. #5
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    Wish I had room for lots of extra lumber, but no such luck. I don’t store a lot, buying what I need when I need it. But, we all have cutoffs and a few extra boards here and there, so I made this to keep things in reasonable order. LOML is ok with this as a “feature” in our finished basement area. Don’t you love when you get the nod for a bit of hobby redecorating.

    1FA8CCFF-E268-4F4A-9930-751754D4C28B.jpg

  6. #6
    I store wood vertically. It takes less space and I can get at specific boards without a lot of time wasted removing and re-stacking boards that always seem to be on top of the one I want.
    Chris

  7. #7
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    $72 seems cheap to me. My single stall garage turned dedicated workshop has 11' ceilings so I'm building double shelves spaced 12" around the perimeter (off the ceiling). Between shelving brackets and the actual shelf wood it's not inexpensive. Right around $3.50 per linear shelf foot.

  8. #8
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    I have several in various places in my shop and like Lowell I like them.. Woodcraft has them on sale a couple of times a year for approx $50.

  9. #9
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    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    Have five sets in the basement shop, would like to have more out in the other part instead of storing wood on the floor

  10. #10
    Lowes had them on clearance last year so I've got two sets of those. I spaced them them all closer together to create one rack that will hold boards up to 12 ft. After a few months I needed even more lumber storage space and, being too cheap to pay the normal price for another set, I made my own using 2x4's on edge and 1" EMT conduit.

  11. #11
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    I have tried both horizontal and vertical storage and finally settled on vertical, using floor flanges and pipe from Home Depot (HD). The only available wall space in my garage shop was bisected by a small mechanical room, so horizontal storage wouldn't work. I was loading my HD cart with short pipe lengths (longer than I really wanted) when the gentleman working the plumbing section asked what I was up to. He told me that he could cut and thread the exact length I wanted from longer lengths of pipe and save me $40 over the price of what I had in my cart! He had them all done in a few hours and texted me when they were ready. How's that for great customer service. I drilled and tapped the end caps to hold the chain keepers. In addition to being much easier to access the wood, vertical storage also accommodates the other long 'stuff' in the shop.
    IMG_1236.jpgIMG_1243.jpgIMG_1272.jpg

  12. #12
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    I was loading my HD cart with short pipe lengths (longer than I really wanted) when the gentleman working the plumbing section asked what I was up to. He told me that he could cut and thread the exact length I wanted from longer lengths of pipe and save me $40 over the price of what I had in my cart! He had them all done in a few hours and texted me when they were ready. How's that for great customer service.
    Dang, sounds better than my solution of buying full length pipe, taking it home, cutting and threading it myself.

    As with so many things there are many good ways to get it done.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
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    I never have enough lumber on hand, to warrant a storage rack....20-40bf is about all I have, just enough for the project being worked on...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Knight View Post
    I store wood vertically. It takes less space and I can get at specific boards without a lot of time wasted removing and re-stacking boards that always seem to be on top of the one I want.
    Great idea Chris- I think I’m going to start doing the same.
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post
    Or you could go home made without the supports in the front getting in the way. 3/4" pipe, floor brackets and 3x4's in this case.
    20191014_144148.jpg 20191014_144234.jpg
    Very ingenious Bill, thanks for sharing!
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

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