Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: garage roof with no rafter or collar ties.

  1. #16
    When you purchase a beam like that, an engineer sizes the beam for you. I mean the company selling the beam has a person who looks at the application and sizes the beam, so the city building inspection office will OK the building.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,118
    My understanding is that, in Califorina, as long as it is all wood any builder can build a house with no engineering if it is two stories or less, maybe three. If they use a steel beam they have to get an engineer to sign off on that part of the structure. I assume that is also true for steel studs?
    Bill D.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,350
    Just finishing a new garage addition built that way. I wanted as much height as I could get for possible future car lift.

    Garage is 22'Wide and 32' long, with the ridge beam being 23' or so long and if I remember correctly it is gluelam that is about 7 1/2" wide and 24" tall.

    Lifted it with a small crane. Big posts holding it up with bolts into a 24" foundation. The whole garage is shear paneled for rigidity. Wide open inside.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,118
    Any idea how much that beam cost? Would a steel beam be cheaper? I assume that is a special order item with some lead time required.
    Bil lD.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bellingham, Washington
    Posts
    1,149
    Generally with a simple roof the ridge board is just for nailing and has no structural purpose. This sounds like a structural ridge which actually carries the rafter load.
    Bracken's Pond Woodworks

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,350
    Mine was certainly structural.

    Sorry Bill, I don't remember what it cost, but it was not cheap.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,128
    Bill if you were going to build using this system the engineered wood products, LVL ,etc. would be the way to go. Engineered by an engineer being key. Structural steel beams are actually cheaper here in Alberta. I have used them in houses for basement beams. The problem with steel is if there is a house fire. It apparently if not fire protected well enough can turn into a noodle and allow the structure to collapse. A built up wood beam or wood product will burn or char but at a much slower rate than the rest of the house so usually remain intact enough too hold structure up longer. We have to cover steel beams with a double layer of type X fireguard drywall here for code.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •