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Thread: What kind of wood is this?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    What kind of wood is this?

    It is very dense. Much heavier than walnut or oak. Half is wiped with mineral spirits to try to show the graind vs dry.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Aug 2013
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    Cumberland, Maryland
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    Maybe Ipe. How did you acquire it?
    You only need 2 tools in life. If it's supposed to move and doesn't... use WD40. If it moves and shouldn't... use duct tape.

  3. #3
    Looks like sapele, to me.

  4. #4
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    What continent are you on, any idea what continent it came from?
    Bill D.
    USA
    North America

    Acacia wood does not float.

  5. #5
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    I am in South Carolina. I acquired it from the spouse of a decesssed ukulele maker here in town. He had all kinds of wood in his shop, some he used in his instruments and some he just had sitting around.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Mills View Post
    I am in South Carolina. I acquired it from the spouse of a decesssed ukulele maker here in town. He had all kinds of wood in his shop, some he used in his instruments and some he just had sitting around.
    It could be one of many species. People who make instruments sometimes use wood from all over the world. Without more information one guess is as good as another with just that picture.
    If that is some liquid applied to part of the board the light reflected at the bottom of the photo suggests it may be a ring porous wood. A close look at the end grain can verify or dismiss this which would narrow the guesses. Search for wood database wood id and read section 7 for how to. On the same web site look up the end grain photos for candidate species. Measuring the density can help. Someone with experience might recognize the smell when cut. Some wood turners work with a wide variety of both domestic and exotic species and might recognize the wood if they can see and hold it.

  7. #7
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    Looks like some variety of African mahogany. If it is dense and has a spicy aroma on freshly cut parts, it is Sapele. If it has a vaguely unpleasant wood smell, then probably Khaya. The dark color looks more like Edinam, which one of my suppliers stocks as just "african mahogany" because it is more stable and uniform in appearance vs the Khaya.
    JR

  8. #8
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    Jan 2013
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    Williamstown,ma
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    Looks like Ipe from here. If you cut it, the dust will be very fine, and often green.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    South Carolina
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    Thanks for the input. I think I will use it in a cutting board since this is the only piece I have and I have no idea what to do with it otherwise.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Gluing unknown wood

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Mills View Post
    Thanks for the input. I think I will use it in a cutting board since this is the only piece I have and I have no idea what to do with it otherwise.
    Some exotic hardwoods contain oils and resins that may require special steps and/or glue.

    This article has some good information: https://www.wood-database.com/wood-a...cal-hardwoods/

    Before gluing up the cutting board perhaps a test gluing a couple of small scraps together would be useful.

    JKJ

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