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Thread: Old tool?

  1. #1
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    Jun 2010
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    Question Old tool?

    While doing a bit of clean up, while waiting on gas meters to get changed out (inside old one, for a new outside one) Found this little gem...
    Mystery tool 1.JPG
    Cleaned the rust spots off..has a logo stamped in the brass end...
    Mystery Tool, logo 1.JPG
    USAAF.....United States Army Air Force?
    Mystery Tool, No 2.JPG
    Down on this end, there is a N O 2 stamped..and a GEO WORTHINGTON CO from BUFFALO NY..
    Even my smallest chuck key I have, will not fit this tiny chuck..
    Mystery Tool, tiny chuck.JPG
    Chuck works fine, but, there is no key to tighten it down on a bit....

    Any clues as to what this WW2 tool was...and where a key would be found?

  2. #2
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    Although I cannot answer your question...

    Did you hook it up to something to see if it works? I suppose you could even just spin one end with your fingers to see what happens.

    Did you try any of your existing keys to see if they work in it? My guess is yes...

  3. #3
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    Smallest key I have is for the 1/4" Jacob chucks....still way too big. Set this into my cordless drill, and gave it a spin....no noise, but it works fine.

    Thoughts about it...drill rivet holes in WW2 aircraft parts on an assembly line? Might also have traveled in a tool box for flight line mechanics?

    Dates from before the USAAF was split from the US Army, and made into the US Air Force...my Late FIL was an instructor for B-17 Bombers, until he was stationed in North Africa, mustered out as MSGT. 1946

  4. #4
    Measure the pilot hole with a drill bit. keys with pilots down to 1/8 are pretty common. If it's smaller than that you are in for a search. Of course the tooth pitch needs to match up too.

  5. #5
    I forgot to mention that the Geo Worthington company was headquartered in Cleveland and got started in the hardware business during the building of the Erie Canal. They were huge in the business of supplying hardware stores. I believe they were bought by or merged with Sentry Hardware around the 80's and went bankrupt sometime after, a victim of the rise of big box stores with their own supply chains and the general decline of hardware stores.

  6. #6
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    My guess is it wasn't used on the assembly line, those would be company tools (think Boeing, Douglas, etc.) or personal tools. I'm thinking in USAAF maintenance, perhaps depot level or field level, not as likely on the flight line. Probably for drilling rivet holes in tight spaces (lots of those on airplanes). What is the largest size bit it could take.

  7. #7
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    Did a google search on small chuck keys, Looks like 1/4 is smallest i the 4 keys in one. Also this info. Not sure it would be that easy.
    "
    How to Size Chuck Key?

    You can easily determine the size of the chuck key that suits your chunk in three steps.
    First, look for any engraved numbers at the chuck. The numbers will be similar to 1/2, 1/4, 3/8, etc.
    Then measure the diameter of the chuck hole using a ruler. It is known as the pilot shank.
    Note down the bit size and the diameter of the chuck hole, and go to your nearby hardware store and handover these measurements to the salesman. He will find you an appropriate key for the chuck."

  8. #8
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    I did a Google search for "1/8" pilot chuck key", for an example, and a bunch came up.
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60911518

    I found this one in a similar way. That's a glove size L hand.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    Measured as 0.125" or, about 1/8" for the hole for the key.

    Capacity looks like a 3/16" drill bit size...1/4" is way too big...

  10. #10
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    Steven, I have a couple of those. One where the bits screw directly into the arbor, no chuck. I’ve used mine on several occasions. The chuck is a #0 size, the key has an 1/8’ pin and 11 teeth. Look on the Fordom website, they use a #0 chuck on there #30 handpiece and a new key can be had for under $5. You might find it in other places just looking for a key for a #0 Jacobs chuck.
    Jim
    Ancora Yacht Service

  11. #11
    Do you have images open? I have some kind of problem apparently with the account

  12. #12
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    One needs to be a contributor to the forum to view images. Cost is minimal, a minimum of $6 USD per year will do it.

  13. #13
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    If you can't find a key that fits, you can tighten and loosen the chuck with a pair of screwdrivers. One in the hole and another against the check teeth levering against the screwdriver in the hole. Works well.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  14. #14
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    You can also buy them from McMaster-Carr for $2.16.
    Jim
    Ancora Yacht Service

  15. #15
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    ACE Hardware didn't have any on hand....so...drop the middle-man...and placed an order @ McMaster-Carr....may get it Monday or Tuesday...we'll see.

    Angle drill may have been used to get into cramped spaces inside of aircraft...like inside of the wings.

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