Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33

Thread: very simple workbench?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Millersburg (Holmes County - Amish Country) Ohio
    Posts
    214

    very simple workbench?

    OK, basically I want to make a SUPER SIMPLE bench.

    I'm thinking 2 - 2x12's and one of these https://www.amazon.com/BLACK-DECKER-...gearpublish-20

    I have one already and putting them together and clamp everything in the middle and go for it.

    I'd drill 3/4" dog holes, but my problem comes in to how to clamp for edge work with planes?
    I don't want to spend the money for end vises or anything fancy like that.

    advice?

    (maybe I should get one of these just working and clamping and then use my 2x12 "table" for assembly etc.
    or maybe all I need is just this: https://www.amazon.com/Keter-Folding...gearpublish-20


    I'm a rank noob and I want to make little things like step stool/tool box combo or small end tables or benches and chairs (way down the road)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,918
    Blog Entries
    1
    Hi Brian,

    My first workbench was a Black & Decker Workmate. One of the problems with these is they are too light to hold work still for planing and other work. You might be able to weight down the tail end with a bucket full of cement to improve stability. The bigger problems come when trying to make a mortise or chop dovetails.

    My father built a bench back in the 1950s made with 2X12s and 2X4s that is still in use. It was built to be solid and steady.

    With an apron along the front and back of a bench it is easy to drill a few holes to allow the use of pipe clamps or other clamps to hold work for edge jointing.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Millersburg (Holmes County - Amish Country) Ohio
    Posts
    214
    Well maybe what I should do is to build a simplified Nicholson bench, because to be honest that's what I really want.
    I'm thinking 72" should be plenty long. I could do 3-2x8 or maybe even 3-2x6 for the top.

    and maybe 1 - 2x12 on each long edge.

    braced stacked 2x6's for legs. That wouldn't be that terrible to do.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,918
    Blog Entries
    1
    braced stacked 2x6's for legs. That wouldn't be that terrible to do.
    My dad used 2X4s for the legs and base. He used 2-2X4s vertically with a single horizontal 2X4s between them and on the outside at the top and bottom. This and other bracing made it a very rigid bench. It wasn't made for wood working. He made it for his appliance repair shop.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    16
    I built Paul Sellerís work bench out of 2x4 and 2x6 could construction lumber . Think I paid $160 for the vice Which was more than I spent on materials. It looks simple but by the time you finish youíll have a decent understanding of hand planing and mortise and tenon joinery. Itís solid as a rock and will give you a bench that you can use right away and also start to experiment with and decide if and where you want dog holes, hold fasts, drawers or if youíd rather build a different style or a more sophisticated bench altogether. And you can watch a play by play version of him building it for free on YouTube. Iím a ways from wanting to build its replacement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Posts
    1,592
    You want a simple bench to be used for woodworking, so build a simple bench. It is woodworking. There are many plans for benches, both complicated and simple, plus methods outlined for holding work without the uses of vises. A simple Nicholson certainly would work and I believe you would be better served by it than the two you show from Amazon. Using construction grade lumber and some doubled up 2x4 legs, especially if you use carriage bolts for joinery rather than nails, will result in something very usable. Go for it.
    David

  7. #7
    Homework:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ru2ZiNs_Wek

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lemsx2_ArnQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2fss7li9p0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukMMQ1nvXt8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukMMQ1nvXt8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYpxhYHMNmI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq0p4IpCIks

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq0p4IpCIks

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyDjZWo3b3U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6qy6yJRvEY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoGVMgYrrr0

    And if you want to get a bit fancier, try:


    https://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-workbench-plans/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiCnhVgVD5E

    A workbench is the most important tool in your shop. Don't start by cutting corners. Seller's bench is easy, he provides a wealth of guidance to a newbie, if you follow along, a very decent bench will result that will justify a bit of pride in your work. It's a bit more than you had in mind, but it's a lot more thant a cobbled-together jack-leg "thing" that won't work all that well and won't last very long.
    Last edited by James Waldron; 10-07-2019 at 9:03 PM.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,373
    I recommend starting with a sawhorse solution.

    Josh Finn has an elemental design that can be stored easily and built with common, available tools and materials.

    https://modernwoodworkersassociation...ch-update.html

  9. #9

  10. #10
    had to do it in two post formatting is screwed up.

    Mike is a hoot to watch and you end up with a very good bench that is designed for the first time builder who doesn't have a bench to build a bench on and has limited tools and skills

    ken

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    453
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Sommers View Post
    Well maybe what I should do is to build a simplified Nicholson bench, because to be honest that's what I really want.
    I'm thinking 72" should be plenty long. I could do 3-2x8 or maybe even 3-2x6 for the top.

    and maybe 1 - 2x12 on each long edge.

    braced stacked 2x6's for legs. That wouldn't be that terrible to do.
    Go to that direction.

    Sometime in the close future I plan to replace my French style 25+ years old workbench by a Nicholson one, also. Actually a couple of weeks ago I received four hand forged holdfasters...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,918
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Osvaldo Cristo View Post
    Go to that direction.

    Sometime in the close future I plan to replace my French style 25+ years old workbench by a Nicholson one, also. Actually a couple of weeks ago I received four hand forged holdfasters...
    Keep it simple. Unless you build your perfect bench, it will help you to refine your design for your needs to build your next bench.

    Osvaldo, surely jealousy abounds on your holdfasts, greatly gloat worthy.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 10-08-2019 at 1:36 AM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    162
    Couple things.

    1. Your first bench will not be your last bench. Build what you can afford, do it now, get going on the projects you want to make, learn the shortcomings of the bench you have, make another bench.

    2. The Paul Sellers bench is going to last a long time and do a lot of things for the small amount of money it costs. You can build a stouter longer lasting bench, but it will probably cost more money. On quality - lifespan - cost it will be hard bench to beat for your second build.

    3. Go ahead and buy a single inexpensive vise. Use it, adjust it, use it some more, just go with it. When you come to loathe it you will be ready to buy a more expensive vise.

    4. If you want to use a hand plane on stuff you are going to need a heavy bench. Or a big pile of concrete on the low shelf of a light bench. Just build what you can and then pile your anvil collection on the lower shelf.

    You will find some folks here seem to be in it for tool restoration or tool collecting and others are making various things. It is a big hobby with a lot of room in many directions. I am pretty well done restoring hand planes and will be buying from the guys who have restored dozens of hand planes in the future.

    Build anything for a bench, just slap some wood together and get going. It is the experience of using that first bench that will help you figure out the second one.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Winners View Post
    Couple things.

    1. Your first bench will not be your last bench. Build what you can afford, do it now, get going on the projects you want to make, learn the shortcomings of the bench you have, make another bench.

    2. The Paul Sellers bench is going to last a long time and do a lot of things for the small amount of money it costs. You can build a stouter longer lasting bench, but it will probably cost more money. On quality - lifespan - cost it will be hard bench to beat for your second build.

    3. Go ahead and buy a single inexpensive vise. Use it, adjust it, use it some more, just go with it. When you come to loathe it you will be ready to buy a more expensive vise.

    4. If you want to use a hand plane on stuff you are going to need a heavy bench. Or a big pile of concrete on the low shelf of a light bench. Just build what you can and then pile your anvil collection on the lower shelf.

    You will find some folks here seem to be in it for tool restoration or tool collecting and others are making various things. It is a big hobby with a lot of room in many directions. I am pretty well done restoring hand planes and will be buying from the guys who have restored dozens of hand planes in the future.

    Build anything for a bench, just slap some wood together and get going. It is the experience of using that first bench that will help you figure out the second one.
    Scott,

    Have you been reading my mail? Reading your post I wasn't sure who wrote it, I looked for quotation marks but didn't see any.

    If you can't tell, I couldn't agree more. The only quibble is the heavy bench part. A bench with a well designed base can be fairly light and not move. My portable Moravian benches are very light (my guess is a good bit less than two hundred lbs. Someday I need to weigh one.) and they are rock solid when using hand planes. My shop Moravians are a little heaver but still much less than a same sized Roubo and are just as stable as the much heaver bench.

    ken

    S

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,373
    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    The only quibble is the heavy bench part. A bench with a well designed base can be fairly light and not move.
    This is an important point.
    A bench can be easily counterweighted at the base, or fixed to the floor (or wall).

    It need not withstand cataclysmic forces.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •