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Thread: Straightedge for jointer setup?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Pollack View Post
    Take a look at John White's book on maintaining and setting up shop equipment. He gives clear instructions on how to make a fixture that involves 3 points and is dead straight. Apparently an old machinist's solution. -Howard
    This. It works, I still have the set I made and use them often.

    It can also be done with a machinist level.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    580
    I bought a Crain 6' steel straight edge at a carpet store locally a number of months back.
    It's supposedly accurate to +/_ 0.005. It was $60something plus tax.

    https://www.tools4flooring.com/crain...-ft-p-639.html

    I haven't used it yet, so I can't give you any feedback on that.
    However, I like the feel of it, the two flats faces are red powder coated, and it has a fairly robust feel, as you'd expect a flooring tool to have.

    If you do use it you'll either need someone help you hold it on it's edge, or make something to keep it in place.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    209 cen Cal.
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    I fought my jointer for years then finally purchased the Veritas 50 ipnch Aluminum straight edge. Turned out I needed to shim the outfeed table. The price at the time was about $80 , been a few years ago. Now it gets used to to check the flatness of handplaned work and any other thing that needs to be flat. Takes alot of frustration away.

    Bill
    Bill

    " You are a square peg in a square hole, and we need to twist you to make you fit. " My boss

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Daily View Post
    Iím getting ready to buy this 50Ē straight edge for myself. Itís a great value at $44.99. Iíve bought several tools from this eBay vendor and have been very pleased. A lot of his tools (new) have only cosmetic defects and sell for quite a discount.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F151867626327
    That straightedge appears to be too narrow, too thin and too short for this purpose.

    Except for the likelihood of getting one that is not straight enough, a long level is functionally much better because of its thickness. And you can weight the end using a sandbag, rather than messing with clamps for each setup.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    1,122
    Third vote for what Howard and Darcy already said,make a set of alignment bars. The book by john White is an excellent resource for machine set up and adjustment.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Central New Jersey, from where you can drive anywhere!
    Posts
    17
    You can make your own test bars cheaply and accurately. Check here, p27, under jointer setup for an accurate, three point, shop made straight edge.

    edit: forgot the link:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=dSLOYO ... er&f=false
    Last edited by Bruce Whitaker; 10-06-2019 at 5:48 PM. Reason: Left out link

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    If the knifes or even one knife is too high above the outfeed table.
    The jointer make hollow gap joints.
    Rule that out first.

    Good Luck
    Aj

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    If the knifes or even one knife is too high above the outfeed table.
    The jointer make hollow gap joints.
    Rule that out first.

    Good Luck
    Two thousandths too high is enuff to do that. I think some tend to think it takes more.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
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    1,617
    This has the the 3 point master bar details on page 31:
    https://www.scribd.com/document/234718161/14-Care-Repair-of-Shop-Machines
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
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    I think you are talking about a spring joint which most if not all european machines are shipped from the factory set this way, you may want that you may not. You actually do want the knives slight hair above the outfeed, I can’t remember off hand right now but I place a 6” or 12” rule on the outfeed table over the knife and when you rotate the head the rule should move slightly (seem to remember 5/64” could be less). Too much causes snipe.


    To adjust coplaner I adjust the outfeed fine adjust a little above middle travel, adjust the table so the knives are at zero with a dial indicator in a oneway jig then I spend the next 4ish hours driving myself nuts, when its all good I then adjust the outfeed down with the fine adjust using the 6” or 12” rule.

    This is on a parallelogram table with insert cutter, I also did it this way on a straight knife scmi for over 20 yrs. I have no experience adjusting a dovetailed way jointer so the process may be different - lots of techniques, opinions, debate...etc...



    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    If the knifes or even one knife is too high above the outfeed table.
    The jointer make hollow gap joints.
    Rule that out first.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by Mark e Kessler; 10-06-2019 at 10:54 PM.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    3,111
    Take three long levels at the store and compare them to each other. That will tell you if they are straight. Two will not be enough to know for sure. You could always get into scrapping to make the straight edges, but again, you will need three straight edges to compare the final results. For wood working you do not need the same precision as metal working straight edges. I would say for wood working you do not have to worry about heat from ungloved hands affecting straightness. unbalanced sun light maybe enough to notice for a long edge.
    Bill D

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Two thousandths too high is enuff to do that. I think some tend to think it takes more.
    I was referring to the out feed table being high for spring-joint, not the knives. Sorry. I need to be more careful !

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Vermont
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    165
    No problems
    Too high at the end of the outfeed and leading edge of infeed could cause a convex shape (not desirable), low could cause concave (spring joint, potentially desirable)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I was referring to the out feed table being high for spring-joint, not the knives. Sorry. I need to be more careful !

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    504
    Machine calibration is one of the more frustrating aspects of starting out in the hobby. Mostly, because it requires a decent upfront investment in a couple quality items that are hard to replicate to the accuracy required in a homemade version. Its hard to setup your jointer, planer, table saw, or anything else without a dial indicator, magnetic base, a good 36"+ straight edge, and a square. The aluminum straight edges from Lee Valley are a good bargain. I bought the 38" when i first got started, and it was satisfactory for a lot of machine setup. Now, i have a 48" starrett that i bought used.

    I would suggest to search for a used starrett or camel back. Sometimes there are deals to be had. Remember, when new these items cost many hundreds, so the original owners tend to care for them like the little Baby Jesus. They are usually in great shape, even if old. If that doesnt work, where are you located? Perhaps an owner can lend you a straight edge for the afternoon? In lieu of that, i would be more than happy to joint a piece of maple or something for you to take back to your place. Or someone to rip a piece of quality ply or MDF off their slider. In my opinion, you want to dial your machines dead nuts on. In the event you cant do that, you can get the jointer table's "close enough", and then focus all of your pressure on the outfeed table. Face the first foot or so and then only apply pressure to the outfeed. This should result in a flat face if your outfeed table is flat.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
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    212
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark e Kessler View Post
    I have had no luck with Taylor tool and their seconds or customer service or even firsts of the PEC squares. The rules are ok but the squares are terrible, if you take the rules out you have to fight to get it back in as there is no anti rotation on the clamp post and the machining of that part is low quality. Additionally the biggest annoyance on the squares as they wonít clamp the blade tight enough so it wonít slip, I thought to was due to ordering a second but it happens on a new one as well

    I probably have early onset old fart syndrome as I have been using Starretts for 30 years and their is no comparison...
    Sorry about your bad experiences- Iíve had nothing but good ones!
    ďPay no attention to what you cannot control..Ē Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

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