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Thread: Sill to concrete barrier

  1. #16
    The easiest would be to use a short piece of 6" flex to make the slight bend; a few inches will add little restriction and will provide some vibration isolation also. If you use the type with smooth interior it won't add much turbulence either.

    Option two would be to try to find a fernco sized for SDR pipe, although I'm not sure it will flex 11 degrees.

    Option three would be to bend a piece of straight pipe by heating it carefully with a heat gun. Not too hard to do, but may take a couple tries to do it without kinks. It's a fine line between soft enough to bend and too soft. You have to heat a fairly wide area to get a smooth bend.

  2. #17
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    How should I connect the walls at the corners?
    Soundproofing and strength are priorities.
    So far my plan is to use a double top sill, 2x6 for staggered studs. The upper sill on the double top will overlap the other wall at the corner, and that upper 2x6 will overlap the top of the the next corner, securing each wall better.





    The first wall I built was the long side in back. I placed a stud at each end, then, starting at one end, a stud every 16" oc, leaving the last stud about a foot from the other end.

    Any suggestions would be most appreciated. This is the first shed I've ever built so I'm a bit apprehensive.
    Also, I'm building the shed with a 9' ceiling so I have plenty of room above the Clearview to make changes and such.
    Last edited by Bill Jobe; 10-14-2019 at 1:21 PM.

  3. #18
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    Is this product ok for the walls of my DC shed?
    Also, should I use Tyvek between that and siding?

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/7-16-in-...6081/202106230

    What adhesive should I use with the foam between the treated sill and concrete slab?

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    When did they start doing that, is it a east coast thing?
    Bill D
    No,Bill. Fads always start on the west coast.
    When I was a young man these fads took anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks to make it here to the Midwest.. Today they arrive at the speed of light.

  5. #20
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    My son-in-law had a corded hammer drill, industrial grade. He also had some 2 part epoxy packets that fit in a sort of caulking gun.
    I will position the sill, drill clear through the 4 in. slab, shoot in the epoxy, drop in a threaded bolt with a nut and washer, drop them in the epoxy, then tighten the nuts down when it's cured.
    I may drill and place one or two Tapcon screws through each sill to hold it tight with the slab as the epoxy cured.

    How have those who've built a soundproof shed for your DC, how did you build your door?
    At the door frame I plan to use 2 2x2s with a strip of foam board insulation between them.

  6. #21
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    I used a double 2x6 top sill (staggered studs)With the 2 shorter ends I have cut the top plates long enough to overlap the lower plate on both ends of the long side to stiffen it up. Since it's a very small shed, should I just use 2x6s for trusses since the cost would be just a little more than 2x4s, and I'll have some left over anyway.
    It's very small (3'4" x 5'4" interior), but with 9' walls the wind will have more to push on.
    Since this is my first shed build I want to overbuild it. A failure would devastate me.

  7. #22
    How have those who've built a soundproof shed for your DC, how did you build your door?
    At the door frame I plan to use 2 2x2s with a strip of foam board insulation between them.
    I built my doors using 2x4 lsl's (laminated strand lumber) sheathed on both sides with 1/2" OSB and filled with Rockwool Safe n Sound mineral wool batts. I chose to use two doors so they wouldn't need as much clear space in front to open as one large door would. The LSL's are perfectly straight and will stay straight. They are also dense. I haven't bothered to weatherstrip the doors because the DC in the closet is plenty enough quiet for me, but you could. The only issue with doors that thick is that you need to taper the edges that meet in the middle so they can open and close without hitting. Of course you have to do that on thinner doors too, just not as much.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    How have those who've built a soundproof shed for your DC, how did you build your door?
    At the door frame I plan to use 2 2x2s with a strip of foam board insulation between them.
    I purchased an insulated Janus steel roll-up door for my DC shed/closet. Easy to install if you have a helper to hold it. They are made for storage units. Not cheap but it allows me full access and I didn't have to worry about the door swing on steps up to the shed.

    DC_Closet.jpg AllDone.jpg

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    My son-in-law had a corded hammer drill, industrial grade. He also had some 2 part epoxy packets that fit in a sort of caulking gun.
    I will position the sill, drill clear through the 4 in. slab, shoot in the epoxy, drop in a threaded bolt with a nut and washer, drop them in the epoxy, then tighten the nuts down when it's cured.
    I may drill and place one or two Tapcon screws through each sill to hold it tight with the slab as the epoxy cured.

    How have those who've built a soundproof shed for your DC, how did you build your door?
    At the door frame I plan to use 2 2x2s with a strip of foam board insulation between them.
    My DC closet is very sound proof. Like, I can stand 1 m from the door and click the DC on and not be able to tell if it's running. I just bought 2 cheap prehung exterior insulated steel doors. The foam in the doors doesn't do much, but I wanted the sealing the comes with exterior doors. The jambs were hung back to back with a 1/2" gap between them, one secured to the outside wall, the other to the inside wall. The gap is filled with closed cell foam weather strip. To each of the doors I secured a layer of 3/4" MDF with Green Glue between them. I added a second set of weather strip to seal against the MDF layer, forming a 'bank vault' type stepped seal. When closing the second door, you really have to lean into it because of the air pressure between the doors.

    Using the epoxy to anchor the sill bolts in an unnecessary expense. Just drill the holes & use tapcons, or another type of concrete anchor. When driving tapcons, use an impact driver rather than a drill. It makes a world of difference.

  10. #25
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    The epoxy was free. And he lent me his hammer drill, a very nice corded unit.
    With the materials he had on hand I can drill clear through the slab and no worrying about moisture beneath the slab as the epoxy works in spite of water.

  11. #26
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    Would making the 2 doors with a 45 on both edges so one would need to be opened in order to open the other work?
    I could build the doors with 2x4s and use staggered 2x2s filling the void with sound deadening insulation.

    One of the handiest materials to have is pond liner....45mil EDPM. I still have a few square feet of it from when I closed my pond. I'm going to try to find ways to use it in certain places to separate 2 wood surfaces that touch. I think there should be ways to use it in making the doors.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  12. #27
    Beveling them at complementary angles would work well as you wouldn't have a direct path for noise or whatever. Yes you would have to open one door first, but that's not an issue for a DC.

  13. #28
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    Check out some of the home theater forums. They will have good discussions on what works & what doesn't for sound proofing.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Dixon View Post
    I purchased an insulated Janus steel roll-up door for my DC shed/closet. Easy to install if you have a helper to hold it. They are made for storage units. Not cheap but it allows me full access and I didn't have to worry about the door swing on steps up to the shed.

    DC_Closet.jpg AllDone.jpg
    Very nice looking.
    Mine probably will hide from cameras.

    My wife and I got 2 walls up. I used epoxy to anchor the hold down bolts. It set up so fast that I barely got the frame off to put down foam under the sill . Sh
    ould have done that prior to drilling holes, I suppose, because when we set it back up we had a hard time getting the bolts to line up and they were fully cured already.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Dixon View Post
    I purchased an insulated Janus steel roll-up door for my DC shed/closet. Easy to install if you have a helper to hold it. They are made for storage units. Not cheap but it allows me full access and I didn't have to worry about the door swing on steps up to the shed.
    That's really the way to go when something on hinges isn't going to work!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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